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1307.6 - Tasmanian State and Regional Indicators, Mar 2008  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/04/2008   
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AGEING IN TASMANIA, 2006 (selected indicators)


Introduction
Population
Living Arrangements
Unpaid Work and Care
Data Sources
Glossary
Explanatory Notes

INTRODUCTION

Australia has an ageing population. Tasmania's population has the oldest age structure of all the states and territories of Australia, and is ageing at a faster rate. The main drivers behind the ageing population trend in Tasmania and Australia are declining fertility rates and increased life expectancy. Net interstate migration has also contributed to Tasmania's ageing population trend. As well, Tasmania's population is ageing both numerically (an increase in the number of people aged 65 years and over in a population) and structurally (an increase in the proportion of a population aged 65 years and over).

In June 2007, Australia's population reached 21 million. However, the general trend in fertility points to fewer Australians being born. One of the main factors behind the sustained low fertility rate is the age at which females first give birth. With access to effective contraception, legalised abortion, and increased opportunities to pursue higher education, forge a career path and establish financial independence, women now have greater choice than ever before about whether/when to have children.

In 2006, the median age of mothers (all confinements) in Tasmania was 29.3 years (30.8 years Australia) compared with 28.3 years in 1996 (29.2 years Australia). Delayed child-bearing creates its own natural limits on family size and increases the likelihood of childlessness. Not only are women having fewer children, but over time, the number of women of child-bearing age in the population is decreasing. These factors contribute to declining fertility.

A decrease in fertility leads to a smaller proportion of a population in younger age groups and a greater proportion of a population in older age groups, while increased life expectancy increases the number of older persons in a population. Issues associated with an increased proportion of older persons will have a significant impact on the social and economic future of Tasmania.

Over the last 10 years, as populations of both Tasmania and Australia have aged, so the proportion of children has decreased. Children (aged 0-14 years) accounted for 19.7% of the Tasmanian population at the 2006 Census (19.8% Australia), compared with 22.5% in 1996 (21.6% Australia). In 2006, females in Tasmania had given birth to an average of 1.9 children. However, females in Tasmania aged 65 years and over had given birth to an average of 3.0 children (2.8 Australia).

Conversely, both the number and proportion of older persons in Tasmania have increased, reinforcing the fact that Tasmania is ageing both numerically and structurally. The proportion of the Tasmanian population aged 65 years and over increased from 12.8% in 1996 (12.1% Australia) to 14.9% in 2006 (13.3% Australia). The proportion of persons aged 85 years and over increased from 1.2% in 1996 to 1.8% in 2006.

Population ageing has been identified as an area of statistical priority for the State. This article describes the characteristics of Tasmania's ageing population in 2006, based on Census data, with particular regard to living arrangements, need for assistance, and unpaid work and care. Care should be exercised when comparing Census data in this article with information from other data sources, such as sample surveys, due to differences in collection methodologies.


POPULATION

Population of Tasmania
  • On Census night, 8 August 2006, there were 476,481 persons usually resident in Tasmania.
  • There were 71,141 (14.9%) persons aged 65 years and over (13.3% Australia).
  • Of these, 62,605 (88.0%) were aged 65-84 years and 8,536 (12.0%) were aged 85 years and over.
  • Females accounted for 55.4% of all persons aged 65 years and over.
  • There were 33,529 females (53.6%) aged 65-84 years compared with 29,076 males (46.4%).
  • The proportion of females aged 85 years and over (68.5%) was more than double that of males (31.5%).
  • There were 77 centenarians reported in the 2006 Census. Of these, 56 were female (72.7%) and 21 were male (27.3%).
  • The median age of the Tasmanian population was 39 years (37 years Australia).


    USUAL RESIDENT POPULATION, by age, Tasmania, 1996-2006

    Graph: Usual resident population, by age, Tasmania, 1996-2006

Population Change, Tasmania, 1996-2006
  • The number of children (aged 0-14 years) decreased by 10,438, from 104,462 (22.5%) in 1996 to 94,024 (19.7%) in 2006.
  • The working age population (aged 15-64 years) increased by 10,727, from 300,589 (64.7%) in 1996 to 311,316 (65.3%) in 2006.
  • The number of persons aged 65-84 years increased by 8,460, from 54,145 (11.7%) in 1996 to 62,605 (13.1%) in 2006.
  • The number of persons aged 85 years and over increased by 3,186 persons, from 5,350 (1.2%) in 1996 to 8,536 (1.8%) in 2006.
  • The median age of the Tasmanian population increased from 34 years in 1996 to 39 years in 2006.
  • Life expectancy for females at birth increased from 80.0 years in 1996 to 82.3 years in 2006.
  • Life expectancy for males at birth increased from 74.1 years in 1996 to 77.4 years in 2006.
In the 10 years since the 1996 Census, the population of Tasmania increased by 11,935 (2.6%). All age groups above 45 years experienced an increase in population, while all age groups below 45 years experienced a decrease. There was a significant exodus of young working age persons of reproductive age, in the 25-29 years age group. Tasmania lost one fifth (20.6%) of its population in this age group between 1996 and 2006, largely due to interstate out-migration. This produced a double-edged effect, where Tasmania lost not only its young people, but also their potential children and hence, the young people of the future.

Conversely, the largest increase in numbers over the same period occurred in the 55-59 years age group. This age group grew by 10,852, an increase of 49.7%. This was partly due to the 'Baby Boomer' cohort progressing into the older end of the working age population. It can also, in part, be attributed to interstate migration, as Tasmania continued to attract older people to take up the relaxed lifestyle of Australia's clean, green state. The combined effect of younger Tasmanians leaving the state and older people migrating from interstate has resulted in the population ageing at a faster rate than anywhere else in the country.

The number of persons aged 65-84 years increased by 8,460 (15.6%), from 54,145 in 1996 to 62,605 in 2006. The number of males aged 65-84 years increased from 24,143 in 1996 to 29,076 in 2006, an increase of 20.4%. The number of females aged 65-84 years increased from 30,002 in 1996 to 33,529 in 2006, an increase of 11.8%. While females continued to dominate this age group, the proportion of males increased from 44.6% in 1996 to 46.4% in 2006.

The number of persons aged 85 years and over also increased markedly (59.6%), from 5,350 persons in 1996 to 8,536 in 2006. The number of males aged 85 years and over increased from 1,597 in 1996 to 2,686 in 2006, an increase of 68.2%. The number of females aged 85 years and over increased from 3,753 in 1996 to 5,850 in 2006, an increase of 55.9%. While females also continued to dominate this age group, the proportion of males increased slightly, from 29.9% in 1996 to 31.5% in 2006.

The following population pyramid highlights the changes in the Tasmanian age structure between 1996 and 2006:


POPULATION CHANGE, Tasmania, 1996-2006
Population Pyramid: Population Change, Tasmania, 1996-2006

Source: Census of population and Housing, 1996, 2006
ABS data available on request


Of Tasmania's 29 Local Government Areas (LGAs), more than half (16) had a higher proportion of persons aged 65 years and over than the State average of 14.9%. Glamorgan/Spring Bay (19.8%) had the highest proportion of the population aged 65 years and over, followed by Break O'Day (17.9%), Devonport (17.6%), Dorset (17.4%) and Central Coast (17.2%). Brighton (7.3%) had the lowest, followed by West Coast (11.2%) and Southern Midlands (11.6%).


PROPORTION OF POPULATION AGED 65 YEARS AND OVER, by LGA, 2006

Graph: Proportion of population aged 65 years and over, by LGA, 2006


Indigenous Population

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in Tasmania has a younger age structure than the general population. Among Indigenous people in Tasmania:
  • Children (aged 0-14 years) accounted for 36.3% of the population, nearly double the proportion of children in the total Tasmanian population (19.7%).
  • The working age population (aged 15-64 years) accounted for 60.4% compared with 65.3% for Tasmania.
  • Older persons (aged 65 years and over) accounted for 3.4% compared with 14.9% for Tasmania.
  • The median age of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population was 20 years compared with 40 years for the non-Indigenous population in Tasmania.
Of all persons aged 65 years and over usually resident in Tasmania, 0.9% were of Indigenous origin. Glamorgan/Spring Bay (7.4%) had the highest proportion of its reported Indigenous population aged 65 years and over, followed by King Island and Flinders (both 6.5%) and Tasman (5.7%).


PROPORTION OF INDIGENOUS POPULATION AGED 65 YEARS AND OVER, by LGA, 2006

Graph: Proportion of Indigenous population aged 65 years and over, by LGA, 2006

Proficiency in Spoken English

Lack of proficiency in spoken English has the potential to affect a person's ability to access appropriate facilities and services. In particular, it may be a barrier to accessing health and care services. It may also limit opportunities for social interaction. As ageing occurs, older persons may lose proficiency in English and revert to their first language. This may impose added complexity to the care of older persons whose first language is other than English. It may be that specific language and cultural skills are required to care for this population group.

In 2006, Tasmania recorded 50,543 usual residents who had been born overseas (4,416,037 Australia). This represented 10.6% of the Tasmanian population (22.2% Australia). Tasmania had the lowest proportion of persons born overseas of any state or territory.

Of persons usually resident in Tasmania:
  • 90.8% were Australian citizens (86.1% Australia)
  • 83.2% were born in Australia (70.9% Australia)
  • 10.6% were born overseas (22.2% Australia)
  • 4.0% were born in England (4.3% Australia)
  • 0.9% were born in New Zealand (2.0% Australia)
  • 0.6% were born in Scotland (0.7% Australia)
  • 0.5% were born in The Netherlands (0.4% Australia)
  • 0.4% were born in Germany (0.5% Australia)
Low proficiency in spoken English is not a major issue in Tasmania. Of the total population of usual residents in Tasmania, 438,165 persons (92.0%) spoke only English at home (78.5% Australia), 15,210 persons (3.2%) whose first language was other than English spoke English very well or well (13.1% Australia) and 2,215 persons (0.5%) whose first language was other than English spoke English either not very well or not at all (2.8% Australia). Not stated accounted for 4.4% (5.6% Australia).

Only a small proportion of older persons in Tasmania had low proficiency in spoken English. Of persons aged 65 years and over, 89.1% spoke only English at home (77.2% Australia), 4.1% whose first language was other than English spoke English either very well or well (10.1% Australia), and 0.7% whose first language was other than English spoke English either not very well or not at all (6.2% Australia). Not stated accounted for 6.2% (6.5% Australia).

Hobart (2.3%) had the highest proportion of older persons, aged 65 years and over, who were not proficient in spoken English, followed by Brighton (1.5%) and Glenorchy (1.4%).

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS

Living Arrangements for Persons aged 65 years and over

Living arrangements reflect the changes in circumstances that often accompany the ageing process, such as the loss of a partner, the availability or lack of carers, a decline in health and a possible increase in disability.

Of the 71,141 persons aged 65 years and over usually resident in Tasmania on Census night in 2006, 91.9% lived in private dwellings, and the remaining 8.1% lived in non-private dwellings.

More than half (53.8%) of persons aged 65 years and over living in a private dwelling lived with their partner, while 6.5% lived with one or more relatives other than their partner. A further 29.8% lived alone.

Of persons aged 65 years and over living in a non-private dwelling, 86.0% lived in cared accommodation. Of these, 57.8% lived in nursing homes, 16.8% lived in accommodation for the retired or aged (not self-contained), and 11.3% lived in hospitals.


DWELLING TYPE, persons aged 65 years and over, Tasmania, 2006

Graph: Dwelling type, persons aged 65 years and over, Tasmania, 2006


In 2006, the proportion of older persons living in private dwellings with their partner decreased from 62.1% of those aged 65-69 years to 19.3% of those aged 85 years and over. The proportion of older persons living alone increased from 19.4% of persons aged 65-69 years to 36.7% of those aged 85 years and over. Older persons living with a relative other than their partner increased from 4.2% of those aged 65-69 years to 9.5% of persons aged 85 years and over.


SELECTED LIVING ARRANGEMENTS, persons aged 65 years and over, Tasmania, 2006
Graph: Selected living arrangements, persons aged 65 years and over, Tasmania, 2006


Of Tasmania's LGAs, West Coast (35.7%) had the highest proportion of persons aged 65 years and over living alone, followed by Glenorchy (31.1%) and Launceston (30.3%). King Island (18.8%) had the lowest proportion of older people living alone, followed by Brighton (20.3%) and Kentish (20.7%).


PERSONS LIVING ALONE, aged 65 years and over,
by LGA, 2006

Graph: Persons living alone, aged 65 years and over, by LGA, 2006


Cared Accommodation

On Census night 2006, 6.9% of Tasmanians aged 65 years and over were living in cared accommodation such as nursing homes, hospitals and accommodation for the retired or aged (not self-contained). Hobart and Brighton (both 10.4%) had the highest proportion of persons aged 65 years and over living in cared accommodation, followed by King Island (9.6%), Launceston (9.0%) and Devonport (7.5%). Central Highlands and Northern Midlands (both 3.4%) had the lowest, followed by Southern Midlands and Latrobe (both 3.5%) and West Coast (4.1%).

Of those persons aged 65 years and over living in cared accommodation, 49.5% were aged 65-84 years and 50.5% were aged 85 years and over.

Of those persons aged 65-84 years, 3.9% lived in cared accommodation. Hobart (6.1%) had the highest proportion of persons living in cared accommodation, followed by King Island (5.5%), Launceston (5.2%), George Town (5.1%) and Brighton (4.6%). Glamorgan/Spring Bay (1.5%) had the lowest, followed by Tasman (1.7%), Huon Valley (2.0%), Northern Midlands and West Coast (both 2.1%).

Almost one-third (29.2%) of persons aged 85 years and over lived in cared accommodation. Brighton (56.0%) had the highest proportion, followed by King Island (39.4%), Tasman (34.4%), Kentish (33.9%) and Hobart (32.4%). Southern Midlands (13.8%) had the lowest, followed by Northern Midlands (16.7%) and Latrobe (17.2%).


PERSONS LIVING IN CARED ACCOMMODATION,
aged 65 years and over, by LGA, 2006

Graph: Persons living in cared accommodation, aged 65 years and over, by LGA, 2006

NEED FOR ASSISTANCE

More people are surviving to older ages. The likelihood of disability and the severity of disability both increase with age. Many old people have a need for assistance due to frailty and illness. For many Tasmanians, increased life expectancy will mean they are likely to be living with a disability for longer.

Questions on 'Core Activity Need for Assistance' were asked for the first time in the 2006 Census. The new topic identified people who needed assistance with one or more of the three core activities (self-care, mobility and/or communication), some or all of the time, due to disability, a long-term health condition (lasting six months or more) or old age. The 'Core Activity Need for Assistance' concept is relatable to the profound/severe core activity limitation category in other surveys, and as such, represents the more severe end of the disability spectrum.

The 2006 Census revealed that 23,655 Tasmanians (5.2% of the population) required daily assistance with self-care, mobility or communication because of a long-term health condition, disability or old age (4.4% Australia). A need for assistance was reported by 5.6% of all females and 4.9% of all males. Tasmania had the highest proportion of need for assistance of all the states and territories in Australia, followed by South Australia (5.1%). This higher than average result reflects the older population profile of these two states. (It is important to note that 5.3% of Tasmanians did not state whether or not they needed assistance and have therefore been excluded from the population when calculating rates.)


PROPORTION OF POPULATION WITH A CORE ACTIVITY NEED FOR ASSISTANCE, 2006

Graph: Proportion of population with a core activity need for assistance, 2006


Of the Tasmanian population as a whole (excluding those for whom need for assistance with core activities was not stated):
  • 13.3% of persons aged 65-84 years reported a need for assistance.
  • 53.6% of persons aged 85 years and over reported a need for assistance.
  • Of all males aged 65-84 years, 11.7% reported a need for assistance.
  • Of all females aged 65-84 years, 14.8% reported a need for assistance.
  • Of all males aged 85 years and over, 43.6% reported a need for assistance.
  • Of all females aged 85 years and over, 58.2% reported a need for assistance.


    PROPORTION OF POPULATION WITH A CORE ACTIVITY NEED FOR ASSISTANCE,
    Tasmania, 2006

    Graph: Proportion of population with a core activity need for assistance, Tasmania, 2006


Of all people reporting a need for assistance with core activities:
  • Older persons aged 65 years and over accounted for 50.3%. Of these, 64.5% were female.
  • Persons aged 65-84 years accounted for 33.0%. Of these, 59.3% were female.
  • Persons aged 85 years and over accounted for 17.2%. Of these, 74.4% were female.
Of males aged 65-84 years with a core activity need for assistance, more than half (53.7%) lived with a partner, 18.2% lived in cared accommodation, 15.6% lived alone and 6.2% lived with other relatives. Of males aged 85 years and over with a core activity need for assistance, 33.5% lived in cared accommodation, 28.8% lived with a partner, 26.2% lived alone and 8.4% lived with other relatives.

Of females aged 65-84 years with a core activity need for assistance, 29.6% lived with a partner, 27.9% lived alone, 23.8% lived in cared accommodation and 13.4% lived with other relatives. Of females aged 85 years and over with a core activity need for assistance, half (50.5%) lived in cared accommodation, 26.0% lived alone, 15.0% lived with other relatives and 5.5% lived with a partner.


LIVING ARRANGEMENTS, males who reported
a need for assistance, Tasmania, 2006


Graph: Living arrangements, males who reported a need for assistance, Tasmania, 2006

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS, females who reported
a need for assistance, Tasmania, 2006


Graph: Living arrangements, females who reported a need for assistance, Tasmania, 2006


Of Tasmania's 29 LGAs, 13 had a higher proportion of all persons needing assistance than the State average of 5.2%. Break O'Day (7.9%) had the highest proportion, followed by Tasman (7.4%), Glenorchy and Waratah/Wynyard (both 6.4%) and Devonport (6.2%).


PROPORTION OF ALL PERSONS WITH A NEED FOR ASSISTANCE
HIGHER THAN THE STATE AVERAGE, by LGA, 2006

Graph: Proportion of all persons with a need for assistance higher than the State average, by LGA, 2006

Of persons aged 65 years and over usually resident in Tasmania, 18.0% reported a core activity need for assistance. Of Tasmania's 29 LGAs, 9 had a proportion of persons in this age group needing assistance higher than the State average. Brighton (22.6%) had the highest proportion, followed by Hobart (21.1%), Break O'Day and Launceston (both 19.3%) and Glenorchy (19.2%).


PROPORTION OF PERSONS AGED 65 YEARS AND OVER WITH
A NEED FOR ASSISTANCE HIGHER THAN THE STATE AVERAGE, by LGA, 2006
Graph: Proportion of persons aged 65 years and over with a need for assistance higher than the State average, by LGA, 2006

UNPAID WORK AND CARE

Unpaid work makes a valuable contribution to Australian society. Questions on unpaid work were asked for the first time in the 2006 Census. The new topic included provision of unpaid assistance to a person with a disability, long term illness or problems related to old age; provision of unpaid child care; unpaid domestic work; and voluntary work for an organisation or group. It is important to note there is not necessarily a direct correspondence between persons with a need for assistance and people that provided unpaid assistance. People who provided unpaid care may have provided care to people not identified by the Census as having a need for assistance, and vice versa.


Unpaid Assistance to a Person with a Disability

The likelihood of becoming a carer increases with age, with caring responsibilities for children, ageing parents and partners. Many people now face a dual caring role: looking after ageing parents as well as children. However, a combination of low fertility, delayed child-bearing and young Tasmanians leaving the State has resulted in a diminished resource pool of potential workers and carers. Hence, there is a growing trend towards community care and "ageing in place", where residents can remain in their own home with appropriate support. Relatives and friends provide a major part of the assistance needed, while government, commercial and private non-profit sources provide additional support.

In the two weeks prior to Census night 2006, 11.8% of people aged 15 years and over usually resident in Tasmania spent time providing unpaid assistance to family members or others because of a disability, a long-term illness or problems relating to old age. Just over one-quarter of these carers (26.1%) were aged 45-54 years, followed by persons aged 55-64 years (23.1%), persons aged 39-44 years (18.1%) and persons aged 65 years and over (15.5%). The proportion of persons providing unpaid assistance decreased markedly from 65 years onwards, as people became more likely to require assistance themselves or recipients died.

The majority of unpaid caregivers were female, providing 61.8% of all unpaid assistance by those aged 15 years and over. Females were the main providers of unpaid care in all age groups under 85 years of age. Females aged 45-54 years provided the highest proportion of unpaid care (16.7%), followed by females aged 55-64 years (14.4%) and females aged 35-44 years (11.6%). Males and females aged 85 years and over provided the least amount of unpaid care (both 0.4%).


PERSONS PROVIDING UNPAID ASSISTANCE TO A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY,
LONG TERM ILLNESS OR PROBLEMS RELATING TO OLD AGE, Tasmania, 2006

Graph: Persons providing unpaid assistance to a person with a disability, long term illness or problems relating to old age, Tasmania, 2006


Unpaid Child Care

Child care is a major issue in today's society. Families may use formal child care or informal child care, or a combination of both, to help them care for their children. Many older persons are taking on the role of caring for children without pay. It is likely that many of these situations involve grandparents caring for their grandchildren.

In the two weeks prior to Census night 2006, 30.4% of Tasmanians aged 15 years and over spent time performing unpaid care for children aged under 15 years. Of these, 68.7% cared for their own children, 27.1% cared for other children, and 4.1% cared for both their own and other children. Of those caring for other children, persons aged 45-54 years accounted for 20.0%. Persons aged 55 years and over accounted for 47.0%, persons aged 55-64 years accounted for 29.5%, while persons aged 65 years and over accounted for 17.5%.


PROVISION OF UNPAID CHILD CARE,
Tasmania, 2006

Graph: Provision of unpaid child care, Tasmania, 2006

PROVISION OF UNPAID CARE FOR OTHER CHILDREN,
Tasmania, 2006

Graph: Provision of unpaid care for other children, Tasmania, 2006

Voluntary Work

Questions on voluntary work were asked for the first time in the 2006 Census. The new topic included help willingly given in the form of time, service or skills, to a club, organisation or association, such as:
  • assisting at organised events and with sports organisations
  • helping with organised school events and activities
  • assisting in churches, hospitals, nursing homes and charities
  • other kinds of volunteer work (e.g. emergency services, etc.)
Voluntary work excluded:
  • unpaid work done through a club, organisation or association in order to qualify for government benefits such as Newstart Allowance
  • any activity which was part of a person's paid employment or family business
Voluntary work makes an invaluable contribution to Australian society, both economically and socially. It fosters community spirit and fulfils community needs. Many Tasmanians are committed to contributing to their community. In the twelve months preceding the 2006 Census, 76,900 Tasmanians aged 15 years and over had spent time doing unpaid voluntary work for an organisation or group. This represented 22.0% of the usual resident population aged 15 years and over who stated whether or not they had participated in voluntary work (19.8% Australia). Around one in five Tasmanians aged less than 65 years (22.3%) had participated in unpaid voluntary work. A similar proportion (22.4%) of persons aged 65-84 years had participated in unpaid voluntary work, indicating that Tasmanians rely heavily on older volunteers.

The age profile of Tasmanian volunteers was as follows:
  • Persons aged 15-64 years, 22.3% (19.9% Australia)
  • Persons aged 65-84 years, 22.4% (21.1% Australia)
  • Persons aged 85 years and over, 6.2% (6.9% Australia)
Of persons participating in unpaid voluntary work for an organisation or group, around one in six (16.0%) were persons aged 65 years and over. More than half of the volunteers in this age group (56.3%) were female.

In Tasmania, almost one-quarter (23.7%) of all females and 15.6% of all males aged 15 years and over had participated in unpaid voluntary work. Tasmania had the third highest participation rate in the country, after the Australian Capital Territory (23.9%) and South Australia (22.1%).


UNPAID VOLUNTARY WORK,
Tasmania, 2006

Graph: Unpaid voluntary work, Tasmania, 2006

UNPAID VOLUNTARY WORK, 2006

Graph: Unpaid voluntary work, 2006

In terms of total volunteers, the big population centres had the highest number of people engaged in unpaid voluntary work. Of Tasmania's volunteers, Hobart accounted for 12.7%, Launceston 11.9%, Clarence 10.1%, Kingborough 7.8% and Glenorchy 6.6%. However, in relative terms, the proportion of volunteers per head of population per LGA revealed a very different picture: Flinders (40.8%) had the highest proportion of the population aged 15 years and over participating in unpaid voluntary work, followed by King Island (34.1%), Break O'Day (29.9%), Glamorgan/Spring Bay (27.3%) and (Tasman 27.2%). These areas are all away from Tasmania's cities.


UNPAID VOLUNTARY WORK, by LGA, 2006

Graph: Unpaid voluntary work, by LGA, 2006

DATA SOURCES

Australian Social Trends, 2007 (cat. no. 4102.0)
Births, Australia, 2006 (cat. no. 3301.0)
Census of Population and Housing
2006 Census of Population and Housing - Fact Sheets, 2006, Measures of Unpaid Work (cat. no. 2914.0)
Deaths, Australia, 2006 (cat. no. 3302.0)


GLOSSARY

Census Dictionary, 2006 (cat. no. 2901.0)


EXPLANATORY NOTES
  1. The 2006 Census of Population and Housing was held on 8 August 2006. Australia's first Census was held in 1911 and since 1961 a Census has been taken every five years, a frequency which is specified in the Census and Statistics Act 1905. The objective of the Census is to count the number of people in Australia on Census night, identifying their key characteristics and those of the dwelling in which they live.

  2. Unless otherwise specified, this paper includes population counts on a "place of usual residence' basis, that is, numbers of people usually resident in Tasmania on 8 August 2006, regardless of where they were counted on Census night. Therefore, overseas visitors are excluded.

  3. Figures presented in this paper may differ from data in other Census publications which are for the most part based on 'place of enumeration', that is, the number of persons counted in Tasmania on Census night.

  4. Figures presented in this paper may also differ from the ABS official estimates of the Australian and Tasmanian populations. Estimated Resident Population (ERP) figures are derived from Census usual resident counts, with adjustments to correct undercounts due to some people being missed and others being counted twice. Statistics on overseas arrivals and departures are used to estimate the number of Australian residents who are temporarily overseas on Census night and therefore not included in Census counts. The collection date of the data also differs: ERP is compiled as at 30 June of each Census year and updated quarterly between Censuses, whereas the Census was conducted on 8 August. Backdating of population estimates from 8 August to 30 June is accomplished using data from birth and death registrations, overseas arrivals and departures, and estimates of interstate migration, for the period 1 July to 8 August.

  5. Census questions on Need for Assistance with Core Activities were based on the criteria used in the ABS Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers, but the population measured differed as a result of the different collection methodology and reduced question format. As such, data for this topic should be taken as an indication of the characteristics of people who reported a need for assistance, not as the total prevalence of people with a 'profound or severe core activity limitation' as represented in the survey data. The major strength of disability related data from the Census is in the ability to analyse small area and population sub-group data.

  6. Formal child care is regulated child care away from the child's home. Care can be provided on a regular or casual basis and fees are charged. Informal child care is non-regulated and may be provided by friends and relatives and other individuals such as paid baby-sitters, either in the child's home or elsewhere.

  7. The 2006 Census findings on Voluntary Work differ from those of the 2006 Voluntary Work Survey due to the different collection methodology used and the reduced question format. The 2006 Voluntary Work Survey was designed to provide a detailed account of volunteers and their volunteering activities in Australia. Information was obtained by a series of questions asked by trained interviewers, whereas the 2006 Census data were collected via a single question on a self-completion Census form. However, Census data are useful for looking at differences in volunteering at the small area level.

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