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6342.0.80.002 - Flexible Working Arrangements in Queensland, Oct 2010 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 06/07/2011   
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GLOSSARY

Adult care

Unpaid or informal care provided for any person aged 15 years and over e.g. looking after a sick partner or elderly parent. Adult care excludes any care that is done as paid work and any care done as part of volunteer work for a club, organisation, association or study program.

Child

A person of any age who is a natural, adopted, step, or foster son or daughter of a couple or lone parent, usually resident in the same household and who does not have a child or partner of his/her own usually resident in the household.

Child care

Unpaid or informal care provided for any child aged 0-14 years including the respondent's own children and/or siblings. Any care that is done as paid work or as part of volunteer work for a club, organisation, association or study program is excluded.

Committee work

Participation in management committees and functions, which involves making decisions about the direction and operation of an organisation. Examples include: sitting on a board, being an office bearer, being a member of the management board of a community welfare organisation, treasurer for the local church, managing a service or program, and program planning.

Couple

Two people in a registered or de facto marriage, who usually live in the same household.

Dependent child/ren/Dependents

All persons aged under 15 years; and people aged 15-24 years who are full-time students, have a parent in the household and did not have a partner or child of their own in the household.

Disability

A disability or restrictive long-term health condition exists if a limitation, restriction, impairment, disease or disorder which restricts everyday activities.

Educational qualifications completed

The highest level of primary, secondary, or tertiary education which a person has completed, irrespective of the type of institution or location where that education was undertaken. Completed means having successfully passed the required assessment(s) or examination(s) i.e. when final results are received.

Family

Two or more persons, one of whom is at least 15 years of age, who are related by blood, marriage (registered or de facto), adoption, step or fostering and who are usually resident in the same household. The basis of a family is formed by identifying the presence of a couple relationship, lone parent-child relationship or other blood relationship. Some households will, therefore, contain more than one family.

Family member

A person who is related to any other member of the household in which they are living.

Flexible working arrangements

A range of working arrangements which give employees a degree of flexibility in managing their work day including working from home or an alternative workplace, working shorter hours for an agreed period of time, flextime, choosing when to take annual leave and purchasing extra annual leave.

Flextime

An arrangement whereby employees can alter their start or finish times, but still work the required number of hours, including time off in lieu.

Full-time student

A person who is formally enrolled in a school, higher education establishment, college of technical and further education, public or private college etc. and active in a course of study on a full-time basis.

Fundraising

Includes a range of activities directed predominantly towards assisting organisations to raise money for their own programs or for those of another organisation. Examples include: door-knocking, selling buttons on button day, making or selling items on a stall or in a charity shop, selling chocolates and selling raffle tickets.

Highest year of primary or secondary school completed

The highest level of primary or secondary education which a person has completed, irrespective of the type of institution or location where that education was undertaken.

Household

A group of residents of a dwelling who share common facilities and meals or who consider themselves to be a household. It is possible for a dwelling to contain more than one household, for example, where regular provision is made for groups to take meals separately and where persons consider their household to be separate.

Household/Family type

This publication presents information for a selection of household composition categories which are based on various family and household compositions. Categories presented are:

  • Couple family with no children;
  • Lone person;
  • Couple family with dependent children and/or dependent students which includes;
      • Couple family with children under 15 and dependent students;
      • Couple family with children under 15 and no dependent students;
      • Couple family with no children under 15 and dependent students;
  • Couple family with non-dependent students;
  • One parent family with dependent children and/or dependent students which includes;
      • One parent family with children under 15 and dependent students;
      • One parent family with children under 15 and no dependent students;
      • One parent family with no children under 15 and dependent students;
  • One parent family with non-dependent children;
  • Other family which includes;
      • Group household;
      • Other family;
      • Non-classifiable.

Injury

An injury is a trauma, poisoning or other condition of rapid onset to which factors and circumstances external to the person contributed significantly (AIHW & DHFS 1998).

Long-term condition

A medical condition (illness, injury or disability) which has lasted at least six months, or which the respondent expects to last for six months or more.

Marital status

The marital status of couples within households. This item includes married (in a registered marriage or a de facto marriage) and not married.

Occupation

From June 2009, classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1, 2009 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Paid parental leave

This leave is employer provided leave. This survey was conducted before the introduction from 1 January 2011 of the Australian National Paid Parental Leave scheme.

Preparing/serving food

Includes food and drink preparation, serving meals and cleaning up. Examples are: assisting in school tuck shops, helping with meals at children's camps, community sausage sizzles and reheating and serving frozen meals provided to aged people.

Private sector

All businesses not classified to the public sector.

Public sector

The public sector in Australia is that part of the economy which consists of all resident enterprises through which the commonwealth, state and local governments, separately or jointly, implement their economic, social and other policies by their ability to control what activities the enterprises undertake and/or how they are undertaken.

Repairing, maintenance, or gardening

Includes a wide range of activities such as: repairing household appliances, painting, making furnishings, checking the state of repair of the dwelling, providing help with lawns, clearing up grounds, rubbish removal, cleaning out garages and gutters.

Relative standard error (RSE)

The standard error expressed as a percentage of the estimate for which it was calculated. It is a measure which is independent of both the size of the sample and the unit of measurement and, as a result, can be used to compare the reliability of different estimates. The smaller an estimate's RSE, the more likely it is that the estimate is a good proxy for that which would have been obtained if the whole population has been surveyed.

Sector of employment

Used to classify a respondent's employer as a public or private enterprise.

Standard error

A measure of the likely difference between estimates obtained in a sample survey and estimates which would have been obtained if the whole population had been surveyed. The magnitude of the standard error associated with any survey is a function of sample design, sample size and population variability.

Short-term condition

A medical condition (illness, injury or disability) which has lasted less than six months, or which the respondent expects to last for less than six months.

Teaching, instructing, coaching, refereeing

Includes classroom assistance given by people other than qualified teachers, e.g. parents. Tour guides in museums and art galleries are included here, and work done by volunteers in local tourist and community information centres, training sports teams and umpiring sporting contests.

Type of voluntary work

Respondents were asked to choose the type of voluntary work activity performed in the preceding 12 months. The categories are:
  • Fund raising;
  • Caring for the aged, disabled or sick;
  • Teaching, instructing, coaching or refereeing;
  • Committee work;
  • Preparing or serving food;
  • Repairing, maintenance or gardening;
  • Emergency and community safety;
  • Environmental protection;
  • Any other type of voluntary work activity.

Unpaid assistance to a person with a disability.

This includes the unpaid help a person gives to another person to assist them with their daily activities. It can include, but is not limited to:
  • Bathing, dressing, toileting and feeding;
  • Helping to move around;
  • Understanding or being understood by others;
  • Providing emotional support and helping maintain friendships and social activities;
  • Helping with or supervising medication;
  • Dressing wounds;
  • Cleaning, laundry, cooking, managing diets and meal preparation;
  • Housework, light household repairs or maintenance, or household finances;
  • Driving or accompanying to appointments and activities.

Unpaid and informal child care

This includes the time a person spends caring for a child or children without being paid. This can include people caring for their own children, whether they usually live with them or not. It can also include people looking after their own grandchildren or the children of other relatives or the children of friends or neighbours.

Unpaid voluntary work

The provision of unpaid help willingly undertaken in the form of time, service or skills, to an organisation or group, excluding work done overseas.

Usual number of hours

The number of hours usually worked in a week.

Work preferences

Whether an employed person would prefer to work more hours, fewer hours, or the same number of hours as they currently work while taking into consideration the effect this would have on their current pay.


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