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4808.0 - Illicit Drug Use, Sources of Australian Data, 2001  
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Contents >> Appendix 1: Sources of data on illicit drug use

Introduction

This appendix is an alphabetic directory of the major sources of Australian data regarding the use of illicit drugs, covering both administrative collections
and surveys, as well as major reports and publications. It includes the responsible organisation and their contact details; the purpose of the collection or report; a description of the source and the data items held; the years for which data are available; and an indication of how data can be accessed.


Contents

A1.1Australian Illicit Drug Report (AIDR)

A1.2Australian Needle and Syringe Program (NSP) Survey

A1.3Australian School Students Alcohol and Drugs Survey (ASSADS)

A1.4Bettering the Evaluation and Care for Health (BEACH)

A1.5Causes of Death collection (COD)

A1.6Clients of Treatment Service Agencies (COTSA)

A1.7Developmental Research for the National Illicit Drugs Campaign

A1.8Drug Use Careers of Offenders (DUCO)

A1.9Drug Use Monitoring in Australia (DUMA)

A1.10Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS)

A1.11Inquiry into Substance Abuse in Australian Communities

A1.12Kids Help Line statistics

A1.13Methadone client statistics

A1.14National AIDS Registry

A1.15National Coroners Information System (NCIS)

A1.16National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS)

A1.17National HIV Database

A1.18National Homicide Monitoring Program

A1.19National Hospital Morbidity Database

A1.20National Minimum Data Set for Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services

A1.21National Mortality Database

A1.22National Police Custody Survey

A1.23National Prisoner Census

A1.24National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing of Adults (SMHWB)

A1.25The social costs of drug abuse in Australia in 1988 and 1992



A1.1

Data sourceAustralian Illicit Drug Report (AIDR)

OrganisationAustralian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence

ContactMark Geddes
Australian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence
GPO Box 1936
CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: 02 6243 5666
Facsimile: 02 6247 5380
Email: mark.geddes@abci.gov.au

PurposeTo provide an overview of the illicit drug market in Australia, intended principally to inform police and law enforcement policy makers.

DescriptionData are collected from police, customs, correctional services and forensic science laboratories, Directors of Public Prosecutions, drug and alcohol research institutes, and drug and alcohol treatment agencies at State and Territory level. Data are collated to give national information on trends in illicit drug use in Australia.

Data items heldArrests by consumer/provider, sex, type of drug, age, seizures by number and quantity, customs detections, trends in trafficking methods, developments in countries where illicit drugs are cultivated and produced, detections of use and trafficking in prisons, purity and prices by State/Territory.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyAnnual

Year(s) of reference1991-1992 to 1999-2000

Selected outputsAustralian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence 2001, Australian Illicit Drug Report 1999-2000, ABCI, Canberra.



A1.2

Data sourceAustralian Needle and Syringe Program (NSP) Survey

OrganisationNational Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research; Collaboration of Australian Needle and Syringe Programs; St Vincent’s Alcohol and Drug Services, Sydney; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre; Macfarlane Burnet Centre for Medical Research

ContactMargaret MacDonald
National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research
376 Victoria St
DARLINGHURST NSW 2010


Telephone: 02 9332 4648
Facsimile: 02 9332 1837
Email: recept@nchecr.unsw.edu.au
Internet: http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr

PurposeTo monitor HIV and HCV infection and related risk behaviours among people who inject drugs. To inform relevant policies and services.

DescriptionDuring a designated week each year, all clients at selected needle and syringe programs, representing all jurisdictions, are asked to complete a brief self-administered questionnaire and provide a finger-prick blood sample for HIV and HCV testing.

Data items heldDemographic items: gender, sexuality, age, language spoken at home by parents, country of birth, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identification


Injecting practices: Type of drug last injected; frequency of injecting in the past month and where this took place; needle sharing behaviour in the last month; treatment history; recent imprisonment; sexual activity in the past month; needle and syringe purchasing behaviour; hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV status; tattoo and body piercing activities.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyAnnual

Year(s) of reference1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000

Selected outputs1. MacDonald, M. A., Wodak, A. D., Dolan, K. A., van Beek, I., Cunningham P. H. & Kaldor, J. M. 2000, ‘Hepatitis C virus antibody prevalence among injecting drug users at selected needle and syringe programs in Australia, 1995-1997’, in Medical Journal of Australia, 2000, Vol.172, pp. 57-61.

2. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research (Ed.) 2001, HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis & sexually transmissible infections in Australia Annual Surveillance Report 2001, NCHECR, University of New South Wales, Sydney.

Available on the Internet http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr/surv_anrep.html

3. MacDonald, M., Wodak, A. D., Ali, R., Crofts, N., Cunningham, P. H., Dolan, K. A., Kelaher, M., Loxley, W. M., van Beek, I. & Kaldor, J. M., on behalf of the Collaboration of Australian Needle Exchanges 1997 ‘HIV prevalence and risk behaviour in needle exchange attenders: a national study’, in Medical Journal of Australia, 1997, vol. 166, pp. 237-240.



A1.3

Data sourceAustralian School Students Alcohol and Drugs Survey

OrganisationAnti-Cancer Council of Victoria
(The surveys are a collaboration between State cancer councils, State health departments and the Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care.)

ContactDavid Hill
Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer
Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria
1 Rathdowne St
CARLTON VIC 3053


Telephone: 03 9635 5180
Facsimile: 03 9635 5380
Email: david.hill@accv.org.au

PurposeHealth policy development and monitoring. Note: the major focus of this survey has been smoking and alcohol use among secondary school students, and it is only since 1996 that questions about illicit drug use have also been included.

DescriptionRandom selection of secondary schools, stratified by State and type of school; self-completion questionnaire answered anonymously by a randomly selected sample of students. There were 31,000 respondents aged 12-17 years in the 1996 survey.

Data items heldDrug-related behaviours, language spoken at home, sex, age, year/level and spending money. Individual States may ask questions on drug-related knowledge and attitudes.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyTriennial

Year(s) of reference1996, 1999 (Although conducted every three years since 1984, it is only since 1996 that questions about illicit drug use have also been included.)

Selected outputsLetcher, T. & White, V. 1999, Australian secondary students’ use of over-the-counter and illicit substances in 1996, National Drug Strategy Monograph Series No. 33, Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, Canberra.


Available on the Internet http://www.health.gov.au/pubhlth/publicat/drugs.htm



A1.4

Data sourceBettering the Evaluation and Care for Health (BEACH)

OrganisationThe General Practice Statistics and Classifications Unit, a collaborating unit of The University of Sydney and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

ContactHelena Britt or Stephanie Knox,
General Practice Statistics and Classification Unit (GPSCU)
University of Sydney
Acacia House
Westmead Hospital
WESTMEAD NSW 2145


Telephone: 02 9845 8151
Facsimile: 02 9845 8155
Email: gpscu@fmrc.org.au
Internet: http://www.fmrc.org.au

PurposeTo describe aspects of general practice

DescriptionDetailed information about 100 consecutive patients of a rolling sample of 1,000 general practitioners each year. Partly funded by pharmaceutical companies and by DHAC.

Data items heldCharacteristics of the doctor, type of medical services provided, characteristics of the patient, reasons for their attendance, problems managed at these consultations, management techniques adopted by the doctor.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyData collected continuously
Year(s) of reference1998, 1999, 2000

Selected output1. Britt, H., Miller, G. C., Charles, J., Knox, S., Sayer, G. P., Valenti, L., Henderson, J. & Kelly, Z. 2000, General practice activity in Australia 1999-2000, AIHW cat. no. GEP 5, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra.

Available on the AIHW website: http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/health.html

2. Data are available as a consultancy.



A1.5

Data sourceCauses of Death collection (COD)

OrganisationAustralian Bureau of Statistics

ContactPeter Burke
Health and Vitals Section
Australian Bureau of Statistics
GPO Box 9817
BRISBANE QLD 4001


Telephone: 07 3222 6069
Facsimile: 07 3222 6038
Email: client.services@abs.gov.au
Internet: http://www.abs.gov.au

PurposeMonitor the cause of all deaths in Australia

DescriptionDeath certificates and coroner’s reports are used to code the cause of all deaths registered within each State and Territory.

Data items heldDate of death, cause of death (ICD), certification, post-mortem flag, sex, age, State of registration, usual State and SLA of residence, year of registration, occupation, birthplace, duration of Australian residence, marital status, date of marriage, age at marriage, duration of marriage, number of children.


An Indigenous identifier has been progressively introduced since 1980.

Geographic coverageAustralia. Data are available for individual States and Territories, and smaller area data may be available.

FrequencyData released annually

Year(s) of reference1964-1999

Selected outputs1. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2000, Deaths, 1999, Cat. no. 3302.0, ABS, Canberra.


2. Data are available as a consultancy.

NoteCauses of death are classified according to ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision) from 1979 to 1998; ICD-10 (10th revision) was introduced for deaths registered from 1999. To provide comparability, 1997 and 1998 were coded in both ICD-9 and ICD-10. With the introduction of the Automated Coding System, from the calendar year 1997, not only is the underlying cause of death coded but also any contributory causes which are mentioned on the death certificate and coroners' reports.



A1.6

Data sourceClients of Treatment Service Agencies (COTSA)

OrganisationNational Drug and Alcohol Research Centre

ContactFiona Shand
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre
University of New South Wales
SYDNEY NSW 2052


Telephone: 02 9385 0333
Facsimile: 02 9385 0222
Email: fionas@unsw.edu.au
Internet: http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/ndarc

PurposeMonitor the changes of characteristics of people using drug and alcohol treatment services

DescriptionOne-day census of clients (both users and friends/relatives of users) of all drug and alcohol treatment agencies across Australia. Agencies were asked to complete a survey form giving some details about each client seen that day. Data are not collected on methadone dosing. The 1995 dataset comprises data for 5,212 clients from 458 agencies.

Data items heldService provided, principal drug problem, drugs injected during the past 12 months, age, sex, country of birth, language spoken at home, employment status, usual residential postcode

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyIrregular

Year(s) of reference1990, 1992, 1995, 2001

Selected outputs1. Torres, M.I., Mattick, R. P., Chen, R. & Baillie, A. 1995, Clients of Treatment Service Agencies: March 1995 Census Findings. Commonwealth Department of Human Services and Health, Canberra.


2. Records from the surveys are available by application to the Social Science Data Archives at the Australian National University



A1.7

Data sourceDevelopmental Research for the National Illicit Drugs Campaign
OrganisationCommonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care

ContactDepartment of Health and Aged Care
GPO Box 9848
SYDNEY NSW 2001


Telephone: 02 9263 3548
Email: sue.bertram@health.gov.au
Internet: http://www.drugs.health.gov.au

PurposeTo inform the development of a community education and information campaign on illicit drugs.

DescriptionThe first, qualitative stage of this study involved 15 focus groups with parents and 65 in-depth interviews with parents and other members of the community.


The second, quantitative stage of the research involved a national telephone survey of 1,004 parents of children aged 12-17 years. It aimed to determine the extent to which the emerging key issues and relevant knowledge, attitudes and behaviours identified in the qualitative phase were representative of a wider population.

Data items heldDemographics of the household members; whether parent smokes, drinks or has tried marijuana; whether respondents considered illegal drug taking to be a problem; the degree to which each drug (including alcohol and tobacco) was considered dangerous; their attitude to their teenage child using drugs; whether they thought it likely their child would be offered specific drugs and whether their child would accept the drug; whether it is the parent's responsibility to inform themselves about illegal drugs; who should take primary responsibility for providing children with information and advice on illegal drugs; if they are confident of their ability to prevent their child from experiencing harm from using illegal drugs; reasons which prevent parents from discussing drugs with children; what would be useful to assist parents

Geographic coverageThe qualitative phase was conducted mainly in Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne, Dubbo (NSW) and Renmark (SA).


The quantitative interviews were conducted nationally.

FrequencyOnce only

Year(s) of reference1998
Selected outputsCommonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care 1999, Research Report on Developmental Research for a Community Education and Information Campaign on Illicit Drugs, DHAC, Population Health Division, Research and Marketing Group, Canberra.

NoteFunded by the National Illicit Drug Strategy.



A1.8

Data sourceDrug Use Careers of Offenders (DUCO)

OrganisationAustralian Institute of Criminology

ContactMs Ibolya Losoncz
Project Officer
Australian Institute of Criminology
GPO Box 2944
CANBERRA ACT 2601


Telephone: 02 6260 9281
Facsimile: 02 6260 9201
Email: Ibolya.Losoncz@aic.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aic.gov.au

PurposeTo provide data on drug use among offenders, criminal activities of offenders, access to treatment of offenders and the illicit drugs market.

DescriptionThe project will target three populations over three years: adult male inmates in the first year, adult female inmates in the second year and juvenile inmates in the final year. Data will be collected from correctional administrative records, cross-validated with face-to-face interviews with persons who have been incarcerated.

Data items heldSelf-reported illicit drug use, self-reported data on offending patterns, information on illicit drug markets and costs associated with drug-related criminal behaviour.

Geographic coverageIn each year, the aim is to obtain random samples from prisons in each State and Territory. In 2001, samples of male prisoners were obtained from prisons in Queensland, Northern Territory, Western Australia and Tasmania.

FrequencyEach of the three different populations are to be surveyed once only

Year(s) of reference2001, 2002, 2003

Selected outputsCommencing in late 2001, monographs, annual reports and journal articles. Forthcoming papers from the study will be made available on the AIC website http://www.aic.gov.au/research/drugs/research/duco.html

NoteFunded by the National Illicit Drug Strategy.



A1.9

Data sourceDrug Use Monitoring in Australia (DUMA)

OrganisationAustralian Institute of Criminology

ContactDr Toni Makkai
Australian Institute of Criminology
GPO Box 2944
CANBERRA ACT 2601


Telephone: 02 6260 9231
Facsimile: 02 6260 9201
Email: DUMA@aic.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aic.gov.au

PurposeTo measure recent drug use among those people detained by police.

DescriptionPolice detainees at four designated sites in three jurisdictions (Southport, Qld; East Perth, WA; Bankstown and Parramatta, NSW) are recruited to answer questionnaires and give urine samples, aimed at gathering information on drug use and crime. In 2000 there were 2,121 detainees interviewed.

Data items heldOffender characteristics: sex and age of detainees, previous arrest/prison history, education status, type of housing, source of income, mental illness and gambling behaviour.


Drug use: positive urine test results (amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabis, cocaine, opiates, multiple drugs, and any drug other than cannabis), previous drug use history, age at first use, treatment history.


Offence information: type of offence (violent, property, drugs, traffic, disorder, warrants, other)

Geographic coverageSouthport, Qld; East Perth, WA; Bankstown and Parramatta, NSW

FrequencyQuarterly

Year(s) of reference1999-2003

Selected outputs1. Makkai, T. & McGregor, K. 2001, Drug Use Monitoring in Australia (DUMA): 2000 Annual Report on Drug Use Among Police Detainees, Research and Public Policy Series No. 37, Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra.


2. Other publications are available on the Internet http://www.aic.gov.au/research/duma.html

NoteFunded by the National Illicit Drug Strategy, with 2002-03 extension funding from the Commonwealth Attorney General's Department. Affiliated with the International Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program, DUMA is designed to ensure comparability of methodology and data across countries.



A1.10

Data sourceIllicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS)
OrganisationCoordinated by National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, research conducted by a variety of centres.
ContactDr Libby Topp
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre
University of New South Wales
SYDNEY NSW 2052

Telephone: 02 9385 0333
Facsimile: 02 9385 0222
Email: l.topp@unsw.edu.au
Internet: http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/ndarc/idrs
PurposeMonitor emergent trends in drug use and markets

DescriptionThere are three components to the IDRS, used for supplementary data and convergent validation:
  • personal interviews with injecting drug users and party drug users (910 respondents in 2000),
  • telephone interviews with key informants (29-60 respondents from each capital city in 2000), and
  • analysis of existing drug-related indicator data (all States).
Data items held
  • User survey: demographics; drug use patterns; price, purity and availability of drugs; criminal activity; risk-taking behaviour; general health status
  • Informant survey: drug use patterns; drug availability; criminal behaviour; and health issues
  • Other data sources include telephone advisory services; drug price, purity and availability data from the ABCI; household surveys (1997 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being of Adults and the 1998 National Drug Strategy Household Survey); Australian Needle and Syringe Program Surveys; National Hospital Morbidity Database; and National Mortality Database.
Geographic coverage1996: Sydney
1997, 1998: Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide
1999, 2000: Data on all capital cities, although injecting drug user survey only in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide
2001: All capital cities except Darwin

FrequencyAnnual

Year(s) of reference1996-2001

Selected outputs1. An annual national report is published.

Topp, L., Darke, S., Bruno, R., Fry, C., Hargreaves, K., Humeniuk, R., McAllister, R., O'Reilly, B., Williams, P. 2001, Australian Drug Trends 2000: Findings from the Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS), NDARC Monograph No. 47, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney.

A summary of information in the report is available on the Internet http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/ndarc/publications/monograph47.htm

2. Annual reports for each State and Territory are available, giving detailed information on drug trends in the capital city.

3. A short hardcopy Drug Trends Bulletin is sent quarterly to those on a mailing list.



A1.11

Data sourceInquiry into Substance Abuse in Australian Communities

OrganisationHouse of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs

ContactCommittee Secretary
Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs
House of Representatives
Parliament House
CANBERRA ACT 2600

Telephone: 02 6277 4566
Facsimile: 02 6277 4844
Email:
fca.reps@aph.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/fca

PurposeTo investigate how much of an impact both legal and illegal drugs have on our society and what the social and economic costs are to the community. The inquiry will focus on how drug abuse affects:
  • family relationships;
  • crime, violence (including domestic violence), and law enforcement;
  • road trauma;
  • workplace safety and productivity; and
  • health care costs.
DescriptionThe committee has invited anyone who has been affected by legal or illegal drug abuse to contact them. It has provided for written submissions to be made and has received oral evidence from hearings held throughout Australia during 2000 and 2001.

Data items heldSubmissions to this enquiry have been received from individuals and organisations. Although confidentiality may be requested, if the committee accepts the submission, it may authorise its publication.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyOnce only

Selected outputs1. Many of the submissions received are available on the website http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/fca, or as bound hardcopies.

2. An interim report was tabled with parliament in October 2001.



A1.12

Data sourceKids Help Line statistics

ContactIan Thomas
Information and Publications Officer
Kids Help Line
PO Box 376
RED HILL QLD 4059

Telephone: 07 3369 1588
Facsimile: 07 3367 1266
Email: admin@kidshelp.com.au
Internet: http://www.kidshelp.com.au

PurposeKids Help Line provides a confidential counselling service to young people. Data are made available to assist with research into youth problems and needs throughout Australia.

DescriptionCounselling services are provided by telephone, email and the web (live-on-line private chat).

Data items heldState of residence, sex, age, drug type if caller ventures the information, severity of calls (inquiry, extent of use such as frequent/habitual drug use, experimental/occasional drug use, urgent intervention required or concern about friend or family member), outcome of call (whether crisis response, counsellor referred caller to appropriate services and if referral was accepted or refused, no referral required or no appropriate service available).

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyAnnual

Year(s) of referenceNational data available from 1994

Selected outputs1. A report on drug use is available on the Internet http://www.kidshelp.com.au/INFO13/DrugUse.htm

2. Data are available as a consultancy.



A1.13

Data sourceMethadone client statistics

OrganisationCommonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care

ContactPolicy Officer, Illicit Drugs Section - MDP 27
Department of Health and Aged Care
GPO Box 9848
CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: 02 6289 1555
Facsimile: 02 6281 6946
Email: phd.frontdesk@health.gov.au
Internet: http://www.health.gov.au
PurposeFor general monitoring purposes

DescriptionThe States and Territories provide their local data to DHAC in October each year. It is collated and provided back to the members of the Methadone and Other Treatment Subcommittee in November.

Data items heldNumber of clients registered with public and private prescribers and correctional institutions in each State or Territory; number of clients collecting doses at pharmacies, public clinics, private clinics, correctional facilities or other facilities in each State or Territory.

Prior to 1999, only client numbers in public clinics and private clinics in each State or Territory.
Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyAnnual

Year(s) of referenceNumbers of methadone clients have been collected since 1986. The type of data collected has varied in detail over this period of time. The latest data available are for the financial year 1999-2000.



A1.14

Data sourceNational AIDS Registry

OrganisationNational Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research

ContactHead of Epidemiology
National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research
376 Victoria St
DARLINGHURST NSW 2010

Telephone: 02 9332 4648
Facsimile: 02 9332 1837
Email: recept@nchecr.unsw.edu.au
Internet: http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr

PurposeDescribe the pattern of advanced HIV infection in Australia
DescriptionAIDS is a notifiable condition in all health jurisdictions in Australia. AIDS cases are notified by the diagnosing doctor through State/Territory health authorities to the national HIV surveillance centre.

Data items heldState/Territory of AIDS diagnosis, sex, date of birth, country of birth, Indigenous status, date of AIDS diagnosis, AIDS defining illness, CD4+ cell count at AIDS diagnosis, date of first HIV diagnosis and source of exposure to HIV.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyContinuous

Year(s) of reference1982 onwards

Selected outputs1. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis & sexually transmissible infections in Australia Annual Surveillance Report. (issued annually by the National Centre of HIV in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW.)

Available on the Internet http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr/surv_anrep.html

2. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Australian HIV Surveillance Report. (issued quarterly by the National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW.)

Available on the Internet http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr/surv_quartrep.html



A1.15

Data sourceNational Coroners Information System (NCIS)

OrganisationMonash University National Centre for Coronial Information

ContactProject Manager
Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine
57-83 Kavanagh St
SOUTHBANK VIC 3006

Telephone: 03 9684 4414
Facsimile: 03 9682 7353
Email: ncis@vifp.monash.edu.au
Internet: http://www.vifp.monash.edu.au/ncis

PurposeTool for coroners and researchers in the public health and safety area, to be used in the investigation of unusual or premature deaths and to provide information on deaths and injury prevention.

DescriptionA central collection of coronial records from all States and Territories with the exception of Queensland. Any coronial record in which drugs are mentioned will become a part of the drugs module.

Data items heldToxicology reports, autopsy reports, coroner’s findings and a narrative of events obtained from police reports to coroners.

Geographic coverageAll States and Territories with the exception of Queensland

FrequencyDaily updates

Year(s) of referenceCommenced 1 July 2000

NoteAccess is restricted to coronial death investigation users and researchers approved by the MUNCCI Research Committee (MRC) and the Standing Committee on Ethics in Research Involving Humans (SCERH) - Monash University. State coronial ethics committees may also be involved in applications for access.



A1.16

Data sourceNational Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS)
(previously known as the National Campaign Against Drug Abuse Social Issues Survey)

OrganisationAustralian Institute of Health and Welfare (1998 and 2001),
Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care (all previous surveys)

ContactMark Cooper-Stanbury
Data and Information Services Unit
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
GPO Box 570
CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: 02 6289 7027
Facsimile: 02 6889 8483
Email: mark.cooper-stanbury@aihw.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aihw.gov.au

PurposeMonitoring the public’s experience of and attitude toward drug use

DescriptionPersonal interview and self-completed questionnaire of random and targeted (youngest) persons aged 14 or more in a random sample of households, nation-wide. In 1999 there were over 10,000 respondents. It is anticipated there will be approximately 20,000 respondents in the 2001 survey.

A supplementary sample of urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples was also included in 1994.
Data items heldSociodemographic items include sex, age, marital status, education, country of birth, languages spoken, income, employment status

Many data items regarding alcohol and other drug-related attitudes, awareness, knowledge and behaviours have been collected. For each drug, respondents are asked about their age of first use, place of use, where the drug was obtained, prevalence of use among friends, days lost from work or education because of drug use and health problems experienced. Questions have enquired about people's perceptions of problems associated with drug use, and their attitudes towards changes to regulations related to the use of drugs and treatments available.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyTriennial (approximately)

Year(s) of reference1985, 1988, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1998, 2001

Selected outputs1. Adhikari, P. and Summerill, A. 2000, 1998 National Drug Strategy Household Survey: Detailed findings, AIHW Cat. no. PHE 27 (Drug Statistics Series No. 6), Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra.

Fitzsimmons, G. & Cooper-Stanbury, M. 2000, 1998 National Drug Strategy Household Survey: State and Territory results, AIHW Cat. no. PHE 26 (Drug Statistics Series No. 5), Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra.

These publications, plus others giving detailed information on drug trends in specific States and Territories, are available on the AIHW website http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/health.html

2. Commonwealth Department of Human Services and Health 1994, National Drug Strategy Household Survey: Urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Supplement, 1994, Looking Glass Press, Canberra.

Available on the Internet http://www.health.gov.au/pubhlth

3. Records from the surveys are available by application to the Social Science Data Archives at the Australian National University.



A1.17

Data sourceNational HIV Database

OrganisationNational Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research

ContactHead of Epidemiology
National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research
376 Victoria St
DARLINGHURST NSW 2010

Telephone: 02 9332 4648
Facsimile: 02 9332 1837
Email: recept@nchecr.unsw.edu.au
Internet: http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr

PurposeDescribe the pattern of newly diagnosed HIV infection in Australia

DescriptionHIV is a notifiable condition in all health jurisdictions in Australia. New diagnoses of HIV infection are notified by the diagnosing doctor or laboratory through State/Territory health authorities to the national HIV surveillance centre.

Data items heldState/Territory of HIV diagnosis, sex, date of birth, Indigenous status, country of birth, date of HIV diagnosis, CD4+ cell count and source of exposure to HIV.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyContinuous

Year(s) of reference1985 onwards

Selected outputs1. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis & sexually transmissible infections in Australia Annual Surveillance Report. (issued annually by the National Centre of HIV in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW.)

Available on the Internet http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr/surv_anrep.html

2. National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Australian HIV Surveillance Report. (issued quarterly by the National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW.)

Available on the Internet http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr/surv_quartrep.html



A1.18

Data sourceNational Homicide Monitoring Program

OrganisationAustralian Institute of Criminology

ContactJenny Mouzos
Research Analyst - Manager
National Homicide Monitoring program
Australian Institute of Criminology
GPO Box 2944
CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: 02 6260 9250
Facsimile: 02 6260 9201
Email: Jenny.Mouzos@aic.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aic.gov.au

PurposeMonitoring of trends and patterns in the incidence of homicide across all Australian jurisdictions

DescriptionData are collected primarily from police records and coronial files, supplemented by information from individual investigating officers.

Information from police records is available to determine whether the offender had consumed alcohol or used illicit/prescription drugs at the time of the homicide incident.

Coronial toxicology reports have been used since 1996-97 to identify whether the victim had consumed alcohol or used illicit/prescription drugs at the time of the homicide incident.

Data items heldType of drug used by the offender, offender demographics (from police records).

Type of drug used by the victim, victim demographics (from coronial records).

Many additional data items are also held regarding the circumstances of the incident, such as alleged motive (including drug dealing), location of incident, the status of the investigation, primary weapon used (including injection of a drug) and victim-offender relationship.

Geographic coverageAll Australian States and Territories

FrequencyAnnual

Year(s) of reference1989-90 to 1999-2000.

Selected outputsMouzos, J. 2000, Homicidal Encounters: A study of Homicide in Australia 1989-1999, Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra.

Mouzos, J. 2001, ‘Homicide in Australia 1999-2000’, in Trends and issues in crime and criminal justice No. 187,Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra.

These publications are available on the AIC website http://www.aic.gov.au/research/hmonitor/index.html



A1.19

Data sourceNational Hospital Morbidity Database

OrganisationAustralian Institute of Health and Welfare

ContactJenny Hargreaves
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
GPO Box 570
CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: 02 6244 1121
Email: jenny.hargreaves@aihw.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aihw.gov.au

PurposeHealth monitoring, health service use analysis

DescriptionData from the separation records of almost all hospitals, both private and public.

Data items heldEstablishment data: State or Territory of hospital; sector (public or private); rural, remote and metropolitan area classification and other characteristics of the hospital; accessibility/remoteness index classification of the hospital.

Demographic data of patient sex; date of birth; age; country of birth; indigenous status; state and local area of residence (SLA, Statistical Subdivision, Statistical Division, rural, remote and metropolitan area classification of patient’s residence.).

Administrative data: accommodation status (the account category of the patient); compensable status (entitlement to claim compensation for the episode of care).

Length of stay data: admission and discharge dates; leave dates.

Clinical and related data: principal diagnosis; additional diagnoses; procedures; type of episode of care;diagnosis related group; admission weight (neonates); referral source; external cause of injury and poisoning; major diagnostic category; mode of separation.

Geographic coverageAustralia. Data are available for individual States and Territories, and smaller area data may be available.

FrequencyData are released annually (financial year).

Year(s) of reference1993-94 to 1999-2000

Selected outputs1. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2001, Australian Hospital Statistics 1999-2000, AIHW Cat. no. HSE 14, (Health Services Series No. 17), AIHW, Canberra.

Available on the AIHW website http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/health.html

2. Data are available as a consultancy.

NoteData are available on the number of hospital episodes and the number of hospital bed days related to the principal diagnosis and up to 30 additional diagnoses. Diagnoses are coded according to ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) used from 1993-94 and ICD-10-AM (ICD 10th Revision, Australian Modified) introduced from 1998-99.



A1.20

Data sourceNational Minimum Data Set for Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services

OrganisationAustralian Institute of Health and Welfare

ContactDr Bradley Grant
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
GPO Box 570
CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: 02 6244 1152
Facsimile: 02 6244 1299
Email: bradley.grant@aihw.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aihw.gov.au

PurposeTo provide nationally consistent data from drug and alcohol treatment service providers

DescriptionClient data are collected when they are initially registered with the service provider. Financial year data are annually forwarded to State and Territory health authorities who forward it to AIHW. Client names are not collected, however, each client is assigned a unique person identifier within a treatment agency, allowing non-identifiable unit record data to be collated.

Data items heldEstablishment data: geographic location, type of service provider, establishment identifier, person identifier, client type.

Patient data: sex, date of birth, country of birth, Indigenous status, preferred language, commencement date, source of referral, principal drug of concern, method of use, other drugs of concern, injecting drug use.

Note: Additional data items have been included for 2001-02.

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyAnnual (financial year)

Year(s) of reference2000-2001 will be the first year.

Selected outputs1. First data will be published by AIHW late in 2002.

2. Grant, B. & Petrie, M. 2001, Alcohol and other drug treatment services,: Development of a National Minimum Data Set, AIHW Cat. no. HSE 12, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra.

3. Conroy, A. & Copeland, J. 1998, National Minimum Data Set Project for Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services: report on the pilot study and recommended set of data definitions, Technical Report No. 65, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney.



A1.21

Data sourceNational Mortality Database

OrganisationAustralian Institute of Health and Welfare

ContactMr John Harding
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
GPO Box 570
CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: 02 6244 1140
Facsimile: 02 6244 1044
Email: john.harding@aihw.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aihw.gov.au

PurposeMonitor the cause of all deaths in Australia

DescriptionA collection of the unit record files from the Causes of Death collection, updated annually. Contains information about the cause of all deaths registered within each State and Territory.

Data items heldDate of death, cause of death (ICD), certification, post-mortem flag, sex, age, State of registration, usual State and SLA of residence, year of registration, occupation, birthplace, duration of Australian residence, marital status, date of marriage, age at marriage, duration of marriage, number of children.

From 1980: Indigenous identifier, place of marriage, registration district, registration number.

Geographic coverageAustralia. Data are available for individual States and Territories, and smaller area data may be available.

FrequencyData are released annually.

Year(s) of reference1964-1999

Selected outputs1. Higgins, K., Cooper-Stanbury, M. & Williams, P. 2000, Statistics on drug use in Australia 1998, AIHW Cat. no. PHE 16, (Drug Statistics Series No. 2), Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra.

2. Data are available as a consultancy.

NoteCauses of death are classified according to ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision) up to 1998. ICD-10 has been used from 1999. Commencing from the calendar year 1997, not only is the underlying cause of death coded but also any contributory causes which are mentioned on the death certificates and coroners’ reports.



A1.22

Data sourceNational Police Custody Survey

OrganisationAustralian Institute of Criminology (1992 and 1995), Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody (1988)

ContactCarlos Carcach
Australian Institute of Criminology
GPO Box 2944
CANBERRA ACT 2601

Telephone: 02 6260 9245
Facsimile: 02 6260 9218
Email: Carlos.Carcach@aic.gov.au
Internet: http://www.aic.gov.au

PurposeTo provide information on the extent and nature of police custody in Australia.

DescriptionA census of all detainees lodged in police cells during August 1995. Statistics are derived from information collected and recorded by police officers at the station level within each State and Territory.

Data items heldDetainee's name, age, gender, Indigenous status; name and postcode of police station or watchhouse; date and time when the person was lodged in cells, reason for being lodged in cells, most serious offence, date and time when the person was released from cells, reason for release from police cells, and whether or not the person was still in police cells at the end of the survey period
Geographic coverageAustralia

Year(s) of referenceAugust 1988, August 1992, August 1995

Selected outputsCarcach, C. & McDonald, D. 1997, National Police Custody Survey August 1995, Research and Public Policy Series No. 9, Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra.

Available on the Internet http://www.aic.gov.au/publications



A1.23

Data sourceNational Prisoner Census

OrganisationAustralian Bureau of Statistics (1994 to present), Australian Institute of Criminology (1972 to 1993)

ContactAustralian Bureau of Statistics
National Centre for Crime and Justice Statistics
GPO Box 2796Y
MELBOURNE VIC 3001

Telephone: 03 9615 7362
Facsimile: 03 9615 7372
Email: crime.justice@abs.gov.au
Internet: http://www.abs.gov.au

PurposeTo provide information on all adult prisoners who were in custody on 30 June each year.

DescriptionA census of all prisoners held in all gazetted adult prisons in Australia as at midnight on 30 June each year. Statistics are derived from information collected and recorded by corrective service agencies within each State and Territory.

Data items heldNumber of prisoners, most serious offence, age, sex, Indigenous status, expected time to serve, aggregated sentence, country of birth, prison location, marital status, employment status, known prior imprisonment, date received, referral status, level of court, State, security, legal status, type of sentence, earliest release, breach, period at large

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyAnnual

Year(s) of reference1972-2000

Selected outputsAustralian Bureau of Statistics 2001, Prisoners in Australia, 2000, Cat. no. 4517.0, ABS, Canberra.



A1.24

Data sourceNational Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing of Adults (SMHWB)

OrganisationAustralian Bureau of Statistics

ContactJosie Barac
Australian Bureau of Statistics
Health Section
PO Box 10
BELCONNEN ACT 2616

Telephone: 02 6252 6415
Facsimile: 02 6252 8007
Email: josie.barac@abs.gov.au
Internet: http://www.abs.gov.au

PurposeDetermine the prevalence of common mental disorders in the population

DescriptionPersonal interview of random persons aged 18+ in households. Approximately 10,600 people participated in the survey.

Data items heldPhysical conditions, ICD-10 classification of mental and behavioural disorders, DSM-IV classification of mental disorders, personality disorders screener, psychosis screener, disability scores, health service utilisation, perceived health needs, days out of role; age, sex, country of birth, year of arrival, number of times married, marital status, number of children, age when children born, language usually spoken at home, education, labour force status, occupation, main source of income, dwelling tenure type, household type, part of State, SEIFA index

Geographic coverageAustralia

FrequencyOnce only

Year(s) of reference1997

Selected outputs1. Australian Bureau of Statistics 1998, Mental Health and Wellbeing: Profile of Adults, Australia 1997, Cat. no. 4326.0, ABS, Canberra.

2. Data are available from the ABS as a consultancy.

3. Hall, W., Teesson, M., Lynskey, M. & Degenhardt, L. 1998, The Prevalence in the Past Year of Substance Use and ICD-10 Substance Use Disorders in Australian Adults: Findings from the National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being, NDARC Technical Report No. 63, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney.

4. The National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) have produced a number of Technical Reports and articles which give relevant information gained from this survey. Details of these publications are available on the NDARC website http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/ndarc

NoteRespondents who had used any class of drug at least five times in the 12 months before the survey were asked detailed questions about any impact of drug taking on their day-to-day lives. The responses were scored according to both ICD-10 and DSM-IV Diagnoses of Harmful Use or Drug Dependency.



A1.25

PublicationThe social costs of drug abuse in Australia in 1988 and 1992

AuthorsDavid Collins and Helen Lapsley

ReferenceCollins, D. J. & Lapsley, H. M. 1996, The social costs of drug abuse in Australia in 1988 and 1992, National Drug Strategy Monograph Series No. 30, Commonwealth Department of Human Services and Health, Canberra.

PurposeTo estimate the dollar costs of drug abuse in Australia on individuals, business and government.

DescriptionThe authors estimate the social costs attributable to tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use, including health costs, loss of production and loss of life.

They calculate government budgetary funding impacts and the impact of drug costs on individuals and business. Costs include hospital bed-day costs, resource costs of addictive consumption, education, research and law enforcement. Methodology and data are updated from the earlier paper mentioned below.

Related publicationsCollins, D. J. & Lapsley, H. M. 1991, Estimating the economic costs of drug abuse in Australia, National Campaign Against Drug Abuse Monograph Series No. 15, Commonwealth Department of Community Services and Health, Canberra.


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