Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Release Date
1318.3 - Qld Stats, Jul 2007  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 23/07/2007   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product


WORKING TIME ARRANGEMENTS, QUEENSLAND, NOVEMBER 2006

Overview
Employees in Main Job
Employees (Excluding OMIEs)
End Notes


OVERVIEW

The working arrangements of employees are important because they impact on the social and economic wellbeing of employees and their families. Access to flexible working hours is of particular interest because of the potential to assist employees in balancing work and family responsibilities.

Statistics in this article were extracted from the Working Time Arrangements Survey conducted in November 2006, which was a supplement to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS). The survey examined factors about the working arrangements of employees in their main job such as shift work, extra hours or overtime and flexibility in start and finish times.

The Working Time Arrangements Survey collects information on employed persons aged 15 years and over who worked in their main job for an employer (and either received remuneration in wages or salary, received a retainer fee from their employer while working on a commission basis, or were paid in tips or piece rates) or operated their own incorporated enterprise with or without employees. Owner managers of incorporated enterprises (OMIEs) are legally defined as employees, but some of their employment characteristics and employment arrangements differ from other employees.

Contributing family workers and employees aged 15-19 years who were attending school were excluded from the survey. For a comprehensive list of scope definitions, see the explanatory notes of the following ABS publication: Working Time Arrangements, Australia, 2006 (cat. no. 6342.0).



EMPLOYEES IN MAIN JOB

In Queensland in November 2006, there were 1.7 million employees aged 15 years and over of which 8% were owner managers of incorporated enterprises (OMIEs) and 92% were employees (excluding OMIEs).

Single and multiple jobholders

In November 2006, 54% of employees who were single jobholders were men. More women (54%) than women were multiple jobholders.

There were 1.6 million employees who were single jobholders in Queensland in November 2006. Of these:
  • 15% usually worked on Saturdays and 7.2% usually worked on Sundays
  • 69% worked on weekdays only, while 30% worked on both weekdays and weekends
  • 30% usually worked between 7pm and 7am.

Men who were single jobholders were more likely to work Monday to Friday1 than women who were single jobholders (76% compared to 59%) and men were also more likely to usually work some hours between 7pm and 7am (33% compared to 27% of women).

There were 92,800 employees who were multiple jobholders in Queensland in November 2006. Of these:
  • 43% usually worked on Saturdays and 28% usually worked on Sundays
  • 39% worked on weekdays only, while 61% worked on both weekdays and weekends
  • 59% usually worked between 7pm and 7am.

Men who were multiple jobholders were more likely to work Monday to Friday1 than women who were multiple jobholders (82% compared to 53%) and men were also more likely to usually work some hours between 7pm and 7am (60% compared to 57% of women).

The majority of employees who were single jobholders usually worked five days of the week (68%). A further 9.2% usually worked six days of the week, while 3.8% usually worked seven days of the week. In comparison, 37% of employees who were multiple jobholders usually worked five days of the week. A further 21% usually worked six days of the week while 23% usually worked seven days of the week.

EMPLOYEES IN MAIN JOB, SINGLE OR MULTIPLE JOBHOLDERS
Selected Arrangements, Queensland – November 2006
Graph: Employees in Main Job, single or multiple jobholders, Selected arrangements, Queensland, November 2006


EMPLOYEES (Excluding OMIEs)

In Queensland in November 2006, there were 1.6 million employees2 aged 15 years and over. Of these:
  • 75% had paid leave entitlements
  • 60% did not have any say in their work start and finish times
  • 71% could choose when their holidays were taken
  • 40% were able to work extra hours in order to take time off
  • 36% usually worked extra hours or overtime
  • 18% usually worked shift work
  • 24% had earnings which varied from one pay period to the next
  • 37% had hours that varied or they were usually required to be on call or standby.

The working time arrangements experienced by Queensland employees2 were similar to those at the national level.

Male and female employees2 in Queensland reported similar patterns of working time arrangements. Four-fifths (80%) of male employees2 had access to paid leave entitlements, compared to 70% of female employees2, reflecting a higher proportion of females who were casual. Men (39%) were also more likely than women (32%) to usually work extra hours or overtime.

EMPLOYEES(a), MALES AND FEMALES
Selected arrangements, Queensland – November 2006
Graph: Employees(a),  Males and  Females, selected arrangements, Queensland, November 2006

Full-time and part-time employees2

In November 2006, full-time employees2 in Queensland, generally reported better working time arrangements than part-time employees2. Full-time employees2 (86%) were more likely to have paid leave entitlements than part-time employees2 (42%). Those working full-time were also more likely to be able to choose when they could take their leave (73% compared with 66% for part-time employees2).

Earnings did not vary from one pay period to the next for 82% of employees2 who worked full-time in their main job compared to 61% of employees2 who worked part-time. Full-time employees2 were less likely to have hours that varied weekly or were usually required to be on standby, compared to part-time employees2 (35% compared to 42%).

A greater proportion of full-time employees2 (44%) were able to work extra hours to take time off than part-time employees2 (29%) and full-time employees2 were more likely to usually work extra hours or overtime (42% compared to 19% of part-time employees2). A higher proportion of part-time employees2 (21%) than full-time employees2 (17%) usually worked shift work.

EMPLOYEES(a) BY FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME STATUS OF MAIN JOB
Selected arrangements, Queensland – November 2006

Graph: Employees(a) by full-time and part-time Status of Main Job, Selected arrangements, Queensland – November 2006



Industry specific working time arrangements

Public administration and safety and Electricity, gas, water and waste services had the highest proportion of employees2 with paid leave entitlements (92% each). Accommodation and food services was the only industry where less than half (40%) of employees2 had paid leave entitlements. In almost all industries, more than half (60% or higher) the employees2 were able to choose when holidays are taken except for Education and training, where only 28% of employees2 reported having this entitlement.
Industries with high proportions of employees2 with paid leave entitlements were also most likely to have employees2 who are able to choose when their holidays are taken.

In November 2006, less than one-quarter (24%) of Queensland employees2 in the Mining industry had some say in their start and finish times. Employees2 in Public administration and safety and Professional, scientific and technical services (60% each) had the highest say in start and finish times.

The industries with the highest proportions of employees2 who were able to choose to work extra hours in order to take time off, all with 60%, were Professional, scientific and technical services; Electricity, gas, water and waste services and Public administration and safety. Employees2 in the Education and training industry (28%) were least likely to be able to choose to work extra hours in order to take time off.

Only the Electricity, gas, water and waste services industry had more than half (53%) of its employees2 usually working extra hours or overtime. Industries with the lowest proportions of employees2 usually working extra hours or overtime were Administrative and support services (22%) and Arts and recreation services and Accommodation and food services (25% each).

In Queensland in November 2006, the Mining industry was the only industry to have more than half (53%) of its employees2 usually working shift work. Other industries with high proportions of shift workers were Accommodation and food services (43%) and Health care and social assistance (35%).

The Accommodation and food services industry had the highest proportion of employees2 whose earnings varied from one pay period to the next (44%) and the second highest proportion of employees2 whose hours varied weekly or were usually required to be on standby (51%). The Education and training industry had the lowest proportions of employees2 whose earnings varied from one pay period to the next (7.3%) and the second lowest proportion of employees2 whose hours varied weekly or were usually required to be on standby (27%).

SELECTED WORKING ARRANGEMENTS BY INDUSTRY, Queensland – November 2006

With paid
leave
entitlements
Had some say
in start and
finish times
Could choose
when their
holidays
are taken
Able to
choose to
work extra hours for
time off
Usually work
extra hours
or overtime
Usually
worked
shift work
Earnings
varied from
one period
to the next
Hours varied weekly or required to be
on standby

PER CENT

Agriculture, forestry and fishing
51.8
42.9
62.0
37.8
26.5
*8.0
26.8
54.7
Mining
90.6
24.1
68.5
35.5
31.4
52.6
19.8
36.0
Manufacturing
81.5
34.2
71.2
44.6
38.6
20.0
19.3
33.9
Electricity, gas, water and waste services
91.7
53.6
88.1
60.3
52.7
**2.0
*23.7
48.3
Construction
72.0
36.3
72.0
44.6
35.3
7.8
25.4
38.0
Wholesale trade
80.0
43.9
79.7
42.6
40.2
*7.1
15.8
31.6
Retail trade
63.3
31.2
73.8
32.7
28.5
15.9
30.1
35.3
Accommodation and food services
40.0
33.4
71.3
29.2
25.1
42.7
43.9
51.4
Transport, postal and warehousing
72.4
31.1
74.3
32.7
39.8
30.1
33.4
50.3
Information media and telecommunications
81.8
34.8
66.6
32.4
39.9
*15.4
26.6
35.3
Financial and insurance services
90.1
52.4
86.0
42.2
44.2
*2.7
*9.1
18.9
Rental, hiring and real estate services
73.7
47.9
81.8
45.4
38.3
*10.1
23.6
48.5
Professional, scientific and technical services
83.4
59.7
80.9
60.4
44.4
*3.0
14.1
26.8
Administrative and support services
60.2
33.6
69.6
28.6
22.0
15.9
25.6
34.7
Public administration and safety
91.9
59.8
83.3
60.2
39.2
16.6
13.5
33.6
Education and training
84.4
35.6
28.4
28.4
45.8
*2.0
7.3
26.8
Health care and social assistance
78.8
35.3
77.1
33.5
34.2
35.2
33.7
43.8
Arts and recreation services
52.9
38.8
73.2
34.5
24.8
*22.5
38.2
45.8
Other services
76.4
43.6
86.3
45.7
27.2
*7.4
17.1
30.9
All industries
74.8
39.2
71.4
39.7
35.8
17.8
23.7
37.1

* estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.
** estimate has a relative standard error greater than 50% and is considered too unreliable for general use.
Source: Working Arrangements, Australia (cat. no. 6342.0)

Occupation specific working time arrangements

In November 2006 in Queensland, Managers (92%) reported the highest proportion of employees2 with paid leave entitlements and the highest proportion of employees2 who were able to choose when holidays were taken (80%). Professionals (89%) were the second highest occupation group having paid leave entitlements, however they had the lowest proportion of employees2 who were able to choose when holidays were taken (60%). Just over one-half (52%) of Labourers had paid leave entitlements.

Of all occupation groups, Managers (65%) and Clerical and administrative workers (52%) had the highest proportions of employees with some say in start and finish times, while Machinery operators and drivers (22%) and Labourers (26%) had the least say.

More than half the Clerical and administrative workers (53%) and Managers (52%) were able to choose to work extra hours in order to take time off. In comparison, only one-quarter (25%) of Labourers could do the same.

In November 2006, more than half the Managers (56%) and Professionals (51%) in Queensland reported that they usually worked extra hours or overtime.

Of all occupation groups, Community and personal service workers (44%) were most likely to usually work shift work and Clerical and administrative workers (5.5%) were least likely.

Less than one-sixth (15%) of Managers had earnings that varied from one period to the next, however more than half (51%) of the same group had hours that varied weekly or were usually required to be on call or standby.

SELECTED WORKING ARRANGEMENTS BY OCCUPATION, Queensland – November 2006

With paid
leave
entitlements
Had some say
in start and
finish times
Could choose
when their
holidays
are taken
Able to
choose to
work extra hours for
time off
Usually work
extra hours
or overtime
Usually
worked
shift work
Earnings
varied from
one period
to the next
Hours varied weekly or required to be
on standby

PER CENT

Managers
91.9
65.2
80.3
52.1
56.1
10.7
14.7
50.5
Professionals
88.8
46.9
60.0
39.8
51.2
14.2
16.3
33.1
Technicians and trades workers
82.4
34.0
75.5
44.4
38.1
14.2
17.4
35.9
Community and personal service workers
61.0
26.0
69.2
29.0
25.3
43.5
40.1
46.6
Clerical and administrative workers
80.7
51.5
79.8
53.3
29.5
5.5
13.5
25.2
Sales workers
57.4
35.2
73.7
33.8
25.6
17.3
37.7
38.9
Machinery operators and drivers
71.7
21.5
70.4
31.0
34.9
31.2
29.0
41.8
Labourers
52.1
25.6
64.9
25.3
23.0
20.7
35.0
39.7
All occupations
74.8
39.2
71.4
39.7
35.8
17.8
23.7
37.1

Source: Working Arrangements, Australia (cat. no. 6342.0)

END NOTES

1. For the data item 'Days of the week usually worked in all jobs', people who reported that they worked from Monday to Friday, inclusive, were categorised as working Monday to Friday. These people may have reported that they also worked on Saturday and Sunday in their job/s. People who reported that the usual days of the week worked varied were categorised only to days varied. A response of days varied could not be provided with any other response.

2. Excluding owner managers of incorporated enterprises.

Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window

Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.