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1362.7 - Regional Statistics, Northern Territory, 2007  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 31/10/2007   
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Law and Public Safety


LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY

A total of 48 589 offences were reported to Northern Territory Police during 2006, an increase of approximately 13% when compared to the 2005 total of 42 995. Bathurst-Melville had the highest proportion of reported acts intending to cause injury (21.7% of all reported offences), and the lowest proportion of road traffic and motor vehicle regulatory offences (15%). Most commonly reported offences in 2006 were: road traffic and motor vehicle regulatory offences (24.8%); theft and related offences (19.7%); property damage and environmental pollution (15.7%); and acts intending to cause injury (9.4%).


In 2006, 61% of all offences reported to Northern Territory Police were cleared. In 2006, the Statistical Subdivision of Daly had the highest clearance rate (86.7%) while Palmerston-East Arm had the lowest (51%).

% of Offences Reported to Police Cleared, Northern Territory: 2001-06
Graph: % of Offences Reported to Police Cleared, Northern Territory: 2001-06

Apprehensions during 2006 in the Northern Territory totalled 11 901 cases, a rate of 576 per 10 000 population. The apprehension rate has increased by 21.3% since 2002. The highest apprehension rate occurred in the Barkly region (1598 per 10 000 population) and the lowest in Litchfield Shire (52 per 10 000 population).


During 2006, 26 315 protective custodies occurred in the Northern Territory, of which 94.1% were Indigenous persons. In 2006 the highest custody rates were observed in: Barkly (5999 per 10 000); Lower Top End (3094 per 10 000); and Darwin City (1602 per 10 000). The lowest rate was observed in Bathurst-Melville (51 per 10 000).


In 2006, the traffic infringement rate for the NT was 1980 per 10 000, compared to 1986 per 10 000 in 2005. The majority of the traffic infringements were for exceeding the speed limit (81.3%) or failing to wear a seat belt (4.6%).

% Change Traffic Infringement notices issued, Northern Territory: 2006
Graph: % Change Traffic Infringement notices issued, Northern Territory: 2006

Domestic violence applications were recorded at a rate of 130 per 10 000 population during 2006, compared to 117 per 10 000 population in 2005. The highest rate (337 per 10 000 population) was observed in Bathurst-Melville in 2006, whilst the lowest was observed in East Arnhem (66 per 10 000 population).


Of the 12 911 criminal cases lodged in 2006 in the Northern Territory, 12 344 (95.6%) were finalised. The highest finalisation rate was observed in Palmerston (99.6%) and the lowest in Barkly (79.8%). In the NT the majority of the cases lodged were road traffic and motor vehicle regulatory offences (29.5%), followed by acts intending to cause injury (22.1%).


Juveniles comprised 8.7% of the total prison population in 2005-06. Indigenous people in 2005-06 comprised 89.5% of the total prison population, compared to 83.6% in 2003-04 and 2004-05.


Further information on law and public safety in the Northern Territory can be obtained from the following sources:


Department of Justice


NT Crime Prevention


NT Police Fire and Emergency Services


Recorded Crime - Victims, Australia (cat. no. 4510.0)


Corrective Services, Australia (cat. no. 4512.0)


Criminal Courts, Australia (cat. no. 4513.0)


Prisoners in Australia (cat. no. 4517.0)


National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (cat. no. 4714.0)





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