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6105.0 - Australian Labour Market Statistics, Apr 2004  
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Feature Article - Spotlight on Multiple Job Holders


This article was published in the October 2003 issue of Australian Labour Market Statistics (cat. no. 6105.0).

INTRODUCTION

Data from the July 2003 Labour Force Survey (LFS) showed that almost 6% of employed persons (549,800 persons) were multiple job holders - people who worked in more than one job during the survey reference week, or who held a second job from which they were absent. While multiple job holders continue to comprise only a relatively small proportion of all employed persons, this proportion is increasing.

Multiple job holders(a)—1990–2002(b)
Graph: Multiple job holders(a)—1990–2002(b)



The age and sex profile of multiple job holders is largely consistent with that of other employed persons (i.e. persons with one job). However, employed females are more likely to have more than one job than employed males and, since 1998, female multiple job holders have outnumbered males in absolute terms as well. In July 2003, 7% of employed females (296,200 persons) had more than one job, compared with 5% of employed males (253,600 persons).



HOURS WORKED

On average, multiple job holders tend to work more hours a week than other employed persons. In July 2003, multiple job holders worked an average of 40 hours a week in all jobs, compared with 37 hours for other employed persons.

Employed persons, Hours usually worked in all jobsJuly 2003
Graph: Employed persons, Hours usually worked in all jobs—July 2003



Consistent with overall labour force trends, the number of hours usually worked by male multiple job holders was higher than that for female multiple job holders, with males working an average of 47 hours, compared with 33 hours for females. More than four fifths (84%) of male multiple job holders in July 2003 were employed full-time, compared with 53% of female multiple job holders.


Almost a third (30%) of multiple job holders usually worked 50 or more hours a week, compared with 17% of other employed persons. In July 2003, almost half (46%) of male multiple job holders and 16% of female multiple job holders usually worked 50 hours a week or more, compared with 25% of other employed males, and 7% of other employed females.



INDUSTRY

The LFS provides information on the industry of the main job of multiple job holders in each quarter month (i.e. February, May, August and November). In May 2003, one in ten people whose main job was in the Cultural and recreational services industry were multiple job holders. Other industries with relatively high proportions of multiple job holders were Health and community services (9%), Education (9%) and Agriculture, forestry and fishing (8%).

Multiple Job holders(a), Industry of main jobMay 2003
Graph: Multiple Job holders(a), Industry of main job—May 2003



Information relating to the second job held by multiple job holders is available from the Multiple Jobholding Survey. This survey is conducted on an irregular basis as a supplement to the LFS, and has as its main population of interest employed persons with more than one job who worked as an employee in at least one of their jobs. The most recently available data, from the July 2001 Multiple Jobholding Survey, show that the second jobs held by multiple job holders were most likely to be in the Retail trade (16%), Property and business services (13%), Health and community services (14%), Accommodation, cafes and restaurants (11%) or Agriculture, forestry and fishing (11%) industries. The most common industry for the second job of male multiple job holders was Agriculture, forestry and fishing (15%), while for females it was Health and community services (18%).

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