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Recorded Crime - Victims, Australia

National statistics about victims of a range of personal, household and family and domestic violence offences as recorded by police

Reference period
2018
Released
27/06/2019

Key statistics

  • There were 168,031 victims of Burglary, the lowest recorded since 2010.
  • Sexual assault rose to 26,312 victims, the seventh consecutive increase.
  • Robbery increased by 6% (528 victims) since 2017.
  • Motor vehicle theft increased by 2% or 864 victims since 2017.

Main features

This publication presents statistics about victims of selected offences that were recorded by police between January 1 and December 31 2018. This is the ninth annual release of the current time series which covers the 2010 to 2018 reference periods.

    Victims of Burglary decrease to a nine year low

    The number of victims of Unlawful entry with intent recorded by police decreased by 5% across Australia, from 176,286 victims in 2017 to 168,031 victims in 2018. This was the lowest number recorded since the beginning of the time series in 2010. (Table 1)

    Five out of the eight states and territories recorded a decrease since 2017:

    • Victoria down 5,815 victims (or 13%) to 38,598 victims
    • Western Australia down 3,114 victims (or 9%) to 30,788 victims
    • New South Wales down 1,539 victims (or 4%) to 36,684 victims
    • Australian Capital Territory down 407 victims (or 16%) to 2,191 victims
    • Tasmania down 319 victims (or 10%) to 2,995 victims (Table 6)


    The remaining states and territories recorded increases: Queensland (up 1,575 victims or 4% to 38,833 victims); the Northern Territory (up 704 victims or 17% to 4,981 victims); and South Australia (up 661 victims or 5% to 12,960 victims). (Table 6)

    For victims of Unlawful entry with intent in 2018:

    • Most (65%) had their property stolen as a result of the offence (109,728 victims)
    • The majority occurred at a residential location (72% or 120,491 victims) (Tables 1 and 3)
       

    Number of Sexual assault victims continues to increase

    In 2018 the number of victims recorded for Sexual assault increased for the seventh consecutive year to 26,312 victims nationally. This was an increase of 2% (475 victims) from 2017. (Table 1)

    For victims of Sexual assault in 2018:

    • The majority were female (84% or 22,097 victims)
    • Around half were aged between 10 and 19 years (45% or 11,911 victims)
    • Most were assaulted at a residential location (65% or 17,006 victims)
    • Almost all incidents did not involve the use of a weapon (94% or 24,631 victims) (Tables 2–4)


    Since the beginning of this series in 2010, Sexual assault has increased by 40% (7,450 victims), which, after accounting for population growth, represents a 23% increase in the victimisation rate (from 86 victims to 105 victims per 100,000 persons). (Table 1)

    Increase in number of Robbery victims

    Between 2017 and 2018 the number of victims of Robbery increased across Australia:

    • Armed robbery up 3% or 157 victims to reach 4,915 victims
    • Unarmed robbery up 8% or 376 victims to reach 5,207 victims (Table 1)


    For these victims:

    • There were more males than females (74% or 6,635 victims compared to 2,275 victims)
    • Half took place at a community location (50% or 5,070), the majority of these on a street/footpath ( 75% or 3,811)
    • A knife was used in over two-fifths (44% or 2,318 victims) of Armed robberies (Tables 2–4)


    Tasmania recorded the highest proportion of Robberies involving a weapon in 2018 at 68% (or 68 victims), while the Northern Territory recorded the lowest (37% or 48 victims). (Table 6)

    Introduction

    Overview

    This publication presents statistics about victims of selected offences that came to the attention of, and were recorded by, police between January 1 and December 31, 2018. The data have been derived from administrative systems maintained by state and territory police agencies and compiled according to the National Crime Recording Standard.

    This collection does not enumerate unique persons or organisations; the same victim may be counted more than once where they have been a victim of multiple offence types, or where victimisation has been reported on more than one occasion during the reference period. As such, users are advised to refrain from aggregating the number of victims across each offence type, as this cannot produce a ‘total number of victims’. It is only meaningful to interpret victim counts within an offence category.

    The Methodology page provides detailed information about the data sources, scope, counting rules and data comparability associated with this publication.

    Changes in this issue

    The 2018 Recorded Crime – Victims release includes revisions to the 2017 data for New South Wales, Western Australia, Tasmania, the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory. Users are advised to refer to the latest version of the publication when making comparisons across reference periods.

    Summary of contents

    Victims of Crime, Australia presents national statistics about victims of a selected range of offences that came to the attention of state and territory police, including comparisons over time. Selected characteristics about the victim (including sex and age) or incident (including weapon use and location) are also presented, as well as the outcome of the police investigation at 30 days from the time of report. National data about victims of Assault and the Relationship of the offender to victim data are not available. See Methodology for details.

    Victims of Crime, states and territories presents information about victims of a selected range of offences for selected jurisdictions. Statistics about the characteristics of the victim (including sex, age and relationship of offender to victim) or the incident (including weapon use and location) are also presented for selected states and territories.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Victims of Crime presents statistics relating to victims who identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and the Northern Territory for a selected range of offences (refer to Methodology). Statistics about the characteristics of the victim (including sex, age and relationship of offender to victim) or the incident (including weapon use and location) are also presented for selected states and territories.

    Victims of Family and Domestic Violence (FDV) - related offences presents statistics about victims of selected offences where the relationship of offender to victim, as stored on police systems, falls within a specified family or domestic relationship, or where an FDV flag has been recorded, following a police investigation. National statistics are available for selected offences only.

    For ease of reading, some offence category labels have been abbreviated throughout this publication. See the Methodology for more information.

    Information on ABS crime and justice statistics

    The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) produces two key data sources that can inform the community about crime victimisation. The first of these is a measure of crimes reported to and recorded by police in a calendar year (this publication). The second is an annual household survey collecting direct reports from members of households about their experiences of crime in the 12 months prior to interview, with results published in Crime Victimisation, Australia (cat. no. 4530.0).

    Neither of these sources alone can provide a complete measure of crime victimisation in the community, but together they provide a more comprehensive picture of victimisation.

    More information about the ABS activities in the field of crime and justice statistics are available on the ABS website.

    Victims of crime, Australia

    Homicide and related offences

    The number of victims of Homicide and related offences across Australia decreased from 432 victims in 2017 to 375 victims in 2018 (down 57 victims or 13%). This was the lowest number since the beginning of the current time series in 2010. (Table 1)

    The following states and territories contributed the most to the decrease since 2017:

    • Victoria (down 60 victims)
    • South Australia (down 20 victims)
    • Queensland (down 11 victims) (Table 6)


    The change in Homicide was due to the decreases in:

    • Attempted murder (down 54 victims or 31%)
    • Manslaughter (down 15 victims or 33%) (Table 1)


    Across Australia in 2018, the number of victims of Murder increased by 12 to 222 victims. (Table 1)

    Murder and Attempted murder shared several characteristics:

    • The majority of Murders (74%) and Attempted murders (66%) took place at a residential location
    • Around two in three victims of Murder (62%) and Attempted murder (66%) were male
    • The majority of both Murders (69%) and Attempted murders (76%) involved the use of a weapon (Tables 2–4)
       

    Sexual assault

    The number of Sexual assault victims recorded by police increased by 2% across Australia, from 25,837 victims in 2017 to 26,312 victims in 2018. (Table 1)

    Consistent with previous years, in 2018:

    • The majority of Sexual assaults occurred at a residential location (65% or 17,006 victims)
    • Most Sexual assault victims were female (84% or 22,097 victims)
    • A quarter of all Sexual assault victims were aged between 15 and 19 years (26% or 6,783 victims) (Tables 2 and 3)


    The highest rate of Sexual assault victimisation was recorded in the Northern Territory at 147 victims per 100,000 persons. The lowest was Tasmania with 34 victims per 100,000 persons in 2018. (Table 6)

    The following states and territories contributed to the national increase in Sexual assault:

    • New South Wales (up 394 victims or 4%)
    • Western Australia (up 132 victims or 5%)
    • Queensland (up 98 victims or 2%)
    • South Australia (up 27 victims or 2%)
    • Australian Capital Territory (up 6 victims or 2%) (Table 6)


    This was the highest number of Sexual assaults recorded since the beginning of the data series in 2010, and was the seventh consecutive year the number of Sexual assault victims reported to police has increased. After accounting for population growth, the victimisation rate also increased from 86 victims of Sexual assault per 100,000 persons in 2010 to 105 victims of Sexual assault per 100,000 persons in 2018. (Table 1)

    Robbery

    In 2018 the number of victims of Robbery recorded increased by 6% to 10,120 victims, from 9,592 victims in 2017. (Table 1)

    The following states and territories contributed to the national increase:

    • Queensland (up 350 victims or 19%)
    • New South Wales (up 141 victims or 5%)
    • Western Australia (up 98 victims or 9%)
    • South Australia (up 49 victims or 11%)
    • Northern Territory (up 30 victims 30%)
    • Tasmania (up 12 victims or 14%) (Table 6)


    In 2018 44% of Armed robberies involved a knife (2,138 victims), while a firearm was used for 13% (618 victims). (Tables 3–4)

    Unlawful entry with intent

    In 2018 there were 168,031 victims of Unlawful entry with intent, which was a 5% (8,255 victims) decrease from the previous year. (Table 1)

    This was the lowest number recorded since the beginning of the current time series, starting in 2010. (Table 1)

    The following states and territories recorded the lowest number of Unlawful entry with intent victims since 2010:

    • Victoria (38,598 victims)
    • New South Wales (36,684 victims)
    • Western Australia (30,788 victims)
    • Tasmania (2,995 victims) (Table 6)


    Unlawful entry with intent most commonly occurred at a residential location, accounting for around 70% of victims across all years since the beginning of the time series in 2010. (Table 3)

    Motor vehicle theft

    Motor vehicle theft increased nationally by 2% or 864 victims in 2018. Over half of the 53,305 Motor vehicles that were stolen in 2018 were taken from a residential location (53% or 28,084 victims). The second most commonly reported location was a street or footpath (26% or 13,552 victims). (Tables 1 and 3)

    Motor vehicle theft increased for the following states and territories:

    • Queensland (up 1,647 victims or 15%)
    • South Australia (up 374 victims or 12%)
    • Northern Territory (up 29 victims or 4%) (Table 6)


    Motor vehicle theft decreased for the following states and territories:

    • Western Australia (down 516 victims or 7%)
    • Australian Capital Territory (down 303 victims or 22%)
    • Tasmania (down 282 victims or 22%)
    • New South Wales (down 87 victims or 1%) (Table 6)


    The number of victims of Motor vehicle theft in Victoria remained relatively stable (up 6 victims or less than 1%) (Table 6)

    Other theft

    The number of victims of Other theft offences (which include the unauthorised taking or use of goods and services from a person, premises or motor vehicle) increased by 3% in 2018, from 510,392 victims in 2017 to 527,434. More than a third of these thefts (37%) occurred from a retail location (196,647 victims), nearly one in three (31%) occurred from a residential location (164,028 victims). (Tables 1 and 3)

    The number of victims of Other theft increased in most states and territories; the largest increased occurred in:

    • Queensland (up 11,681 victims or 10%)
    • Victoria (up 6,899 victims or 6%)
    • South Australia (up 5,246 victims or 14%)
    • New South Wales (up 707 victims or less than 1%)

    Victims of crime, states and territories

    This chapter presents state and territory statistics about victims of a selected range of offences that came to the attention of state and territory police during the period 1 January to 31 December 2018. Note that Assault data are not published for Victoria or Queensland (see the Methodology for further information).

    New South Wales

    Homicide and related offences

    The number of victims of Homicide and related offences in New South Wales increased for the first time in five years, from 78 victims in 2017 to 99 victims in 2018. (Table 6)

    For victims of Homicide and related offences in 2018:

    • The majority (75%) of Homicide victims were male (74 victims) and 37% of these male victims were aged between 35 and 54 years
    • Over two-thirds (68%) of female victims of Homicide were aged 35 years or older (17 victims)
    • Murder comprised 70% of all recorded Homicides (69 victims)
    • The majority (61%) occurred at a residential location (60 victims)
    • A knife was the most common weapon used by the offender(s) (35 victims) (Tables 6–9)
       

    Assault

    In 2018 there were 66,111 victims of Assault recorded in New South Wales, which was a 1% increase from the previous year (up 651 victims). (Table 6)

    For victims of Assault in 2018:

    • A quarter were aged between 25 and 34 years (25% or 16,235 victims)
    • Over half (54%) were male (35,657 victims)
    • More than half (53%) occurred at a residential location (35,254 victims), while 16% occurred on a street or footpath (10,586 victims)
    • Around two-thirds of victims (68%) knew the offender (44,693 victims)
    • Females were assaulted by a known person (25,006 victims) more than males (19,500 victims)
    • More males were assaulted by a stranger than females (75% or 12,825 males compared to 4,143 females). (Tables 6–9, 11 and 12)
       

    Sexual assault

    The number of victims of Sexual assault recorded in New South Wales increased by 4%, from 9,847 victims in 2017 to 10,241 victims in 2018, to reach their highest levels since the beginning of the current time series (2010). (Table 6)

    Almost one in five Sexual assault victims were male (19%), which was the highest proportion of male victims across the states and territories (1,893 victims). The most common age group for male victims was under ten years of age (25% or 479 victims). (Table 7)

    There were 8,297 female victims recorded in New South Wales in 2018. More than a quarter of female victims were aged between 15 and 19 years (29% or 2,395 victims). (Table 7)

    Over three-quarters of Sexual assault victims knew the offender (75% or 7,688 victims). Non-family members were the most commonly recorded relationship type (64% or 4,891 victims), followed by family members (36% or 2,801 victims). (Table 11)

    The majority (62%) of Sexual assaults occurred at a residential location (6,380 victims). Less than 1% involved the use of a weapon (33 victims). (Tables 8 and 9)

    ​​​​​​​Robbery

    There were 2,817 victims of Robbery recorded in New South Wales in 2018. This was the second year in which this number increased, up by 5% (141 victims) from 2017. (Table 6)

    For victims of Robbery in New South Wales:

    • There were three times as many male victims than female (1,861 and 627 victims, respectively)
    • Nearly two-thirds (61%) did not involve a weapon (1,707 victims)
    • The most common location was a street/footpath (40% or 1,138 victims) (Tables 7–9)


    The number of victims of Armed robbery increased by 8% (83 victims) since 2017, the first increase in this offence since 2013. A knife was the most common weapon used in Armed robberies (63% or 709 victims). (Tables 8 and 9)

    In 2018 Unarmed robberies increased for a second consecutive year, to 1,707 victims. Almost half (46%) occurred on a street/footpath location (784 victims). (Tables 6 and 8)

    ​​​​​​​Motor vehicle theft

    In 2018 there were 12,290 victims of Motor vehicle theft recorded in New South Wales, down 1% since 2017 (12,377 victims). An outbuilding or residential land (including a driveway, carport or garage) was the most common location from which a motor vehicle was stolen (50% or 6,078 victims). (Tables 6 and 8)

    ​​​​​​​Unlawful entry with intent

    Between 2017 and 2018, the number of victims of Unlawful entry with intent (UEWI) decreased by 4%. This represented the eighth consecutive annual decrease since the time series began in 2010. The number of victims has decreased by over a third (39% or 23,037 victims) during this period, from 59,721 to 36,684 victims. (Table 6)

    Three-quarters (75%) of UEWI occurred at a residential location (27,460 victims). (Table 8)

    ​​​​​​​Other theft

    There were 132,909 victims of Other theft recorded in New South Wales, an increase of 1% (or 707 victims) since 2017. New South Wales accounted for a quarter (25%) of the total Other theft victims in Australia. More than a third (38%) of Other thefts in New South Wales took place in a retail location (50,063 victims). (Tables 1, 6 and 8)

    Victoria

    ​​​​​​​Homicide

    In 2018 there were 85 victims of Homicide and related offences recorded in Victoria.

    • Over half (58%) of all Homicide victims were male (49 victims)
    • The majority of female Homicide victims knew the offender (81% or 29 female victims) (Table 12)


    Victims of Murder accounted for 61% of all Homicide offences (52 victims), Attempted murder accounted for almost a third (32% or 27 victims). There were 6 victims of Manslaughter in 2018. (Table 6)

    The majority (79%) of all recorded Homicides occurred at a residential location (67 victims) and almost a third (32%) involved the use of a knife (27 victims). (Tables 8 and 9)

    ​​​​​​​Robbery

    The number of victims of Robbery decreased for the first time in four years in Victoria, down 4% from 2017 (or 139 victims) to 2,988 victims in 2018. (Table 6)

    For victims of Robbery:

    • Over half were armed robberies (57%), of which almost one third involved a knife
    • Almost two-fifths (41%) occurred at a street/footpath location and a further 13% occurred at a transport location
    • The majority of victims were male (80% or 2,252) (Tables 7–9)


    Approximately a third of the offender(s) was proceeded against by police within 30 days of the incident being recorded (31% or 928 victims). (Table 10)

    ​​​​​​​Unlawful entry with intent

    The number of victims of Unlawful entry with intent decreased in Victoria, from 44,413 victims in 2017 to 38,598 victims in 2018 and represented the second consecutive annual decrease. This was the lowest number of victims for this offence since the beginning of the current time series in 2010. (Table 6).

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    Over two-thirds of victims of Unlawful entry with intent had property stolen in 2018 (67% or 25,999 victims). Of these over half (57% or 14,893) occurred at a dwelling. (Tables 6 and 8)

    Queensland

    Homicide and related offences

    The number of victims of Homicide and related offences in Queensland decreased to 78 victims in 2018. This was the lowest number since the beginning of the time series in 2010.

    For victims of homicide and related offences in 2018:

    • Most were male (71% or 55 male victims)
    • The offender was a stranger in over half of instances where the victim was a male (53% or 29 victims)
    • The offender was known to the victim in almost two-thirds of instances where the victim was female (65% or 15 female victims) (Table 12)


    Over two-thirds of all Homicide and related offences occurred at a residential location (68% or 53 victims). (Table 8)​​​​​

    Sexual assault

    The number of victims of Sexual assault increased for the sixth consecutive year to reach 4,849 victims in 2018. The victimisation rate increased over this time from 86 victims in 2013 to 97 victims per 100,000 persons in 2018, which was the highest rate recorded for the time series (beginning in 2010). (Table 6)

    There were almost six times more female victims of Sexual assault than male victims (4,136 and 712 victims respectively).

    For female victims:

    • The majority knew the offender (72% or 2,987 victims)
    • Half were aged between 10–19 years (50% or 2,066 victims). (Tables 12 and 15)


    Over two-thirds of Sexual assaults in 2018 occurred at a residential location (68% or 3,284 victims). Most Sexual assaults did not involve the use of a weapon (93% or 4,494 victims). (Tables 8 and 9)

    ​​​​​​​Robbery

    The number of victims of Robbery increased to reach their highest recorded levels since the beginning of the time series in 2010, with 2,195 victims in 2018. (Table 6)

    This increase was caused by a rise in both Armed and Unarmed robbery (up 191 and 155 victims, respectively). (Table 6)

    For victims of Robbery in Queensland:

    • The majority did not know the offender (77% or 1,351 victims)
    • There were twice as many male victims than female victims (1,222 and 534 victims respectively)
    • Close to two-thirds occurred at a street/footpath and retail location (60% )
    • A knife was used in almost half of all Armed robberies (49% or 537 victims) (Tables 6–9 and Table 11)
       

    ​​​​​​​Property crime

    Between 2017 and 2018 the total number of victims of property crimes in Queensland increased by 9% (or 14,903 victims) to reach their highest levels since 2010 at 178,690 victims. (Table 6)

    This was caused by increases across all property offences:

    • Other theft up 11,681 victims (or 10%)
    • Motor vehicle theft up 1,647 victims (or 15%)
    • Unlawful entry with intent up 1,575 victims (or 4%) (Table 6)


    Victims of Other theft and Motor vehicle theft both increased to reach their highest levels since the beginning of the time series (in 2010). (Tables 6)

    Over half (58%) of motor vehicle thefts (or 7,349 victims) occurred at residential location and 45% of Other thefts occurred at a retail location (57,532 victims). (Table 8)

    South Australia

    ​​​​​​​Homicide and related offences

    There were 28 victims of Homicide and related offences recorded in South Australia in 2018, 20 less than the previous year. (Table 6)

    Over half of all Homicide victims were male (16 or 57% victims). (Table 7)

    The majority of victims of this offence knew the offender (75% or 21 victims) and almost two-thirds (64%) occurred at a residential location (18 victims). A weapon was used in the majority of incidents (79% or 22 victims). (Tables 8, 9 and 11)

    Assault

    Between 2017 and 2018 the number of victims of Assault in South Australia increased by 2% from 16,213 to 16,580 victims. This resulted in a victimisation rate increase of 941 victims to 955 victims per 100,000 persons (Table 6)

    Female victims accounted for just over half of victims of Assault in South Australia (52% or 8,544 victims). A higher proportion of female victims knew the offender (63% or 7,082 victims) compared to male victims (37% or 4,214 victims). Males accounted for a higher proportion of victims assaulted by a stranger (74% or 3,548 victims) compared to female victims (26% and 1,254). (Tables 12 and 13)

    In 2018 55% of Assaults occurred at a residential location (9,170 victims) and a further 30% at a community location (4,895 victims). (Table 8)

    Robbery

    In 2018 the number of victims of Robbery recorded increased from 459 victims in 2017 to 508 victims (up 11%). This was the first increase since the beginning of the current time series, in 2010. (Table 6)

    In 2018, the majority (73% or 320 victims) of Robbery victims in South Australia were male and the most prevalent age group for male victims was between 25 and 34 years (80 victims). (Table 7)

    For victims of Robbery in 2018:

    • Over a third (38%) occurred at a street/footpath location (193 victims)
    • Around a quarter (26%) occurred at a retail location (130 victims) and nearly a fifth (17%) occurred at a dwelling (86 victims)
    • One in two (49%) were armed (247 victims)
    • Over two fifths (44%) of Armed robberies involved the use of a knife (108 victims) and a further 11% involved the use of a bat/bar/club (28 victims) (Tables 8 and 9)
       

    Unlawful entry with intent

    Between 2017 and 2018 the number of victims of Unlawful entry with intent in South Australia increased by 5% to 12,960 victims. Since the beginning of the data series in 2010 there has been a 23% (or 3,868 victims) decrease in this offence. (Table 6)

    The majority (67%) of break-ins occurred at a dwelling (8,736 victims) and 11% occurred at a retail location (1,391 victims). (Table 8)

    ​​​​​​​Motor vehicle theft

    In 2018 the number of victims of Motor vehicle theft decreased by 12% (or 374 victims) to 3,397 victims. Half (50%) of all motor vehicles were stolen from a residential location (1,691 victims) and almost a third (32%) were stolen from a street/footpath (1,069 victims). (Tables 6 and 8)

    Western Australia

    ​​​​​​​Homicide and related offences

    The number of victims of Homicide and related offences increased from 50 to 64 victims in 2018. (Table 6)

    Just over half (53%) of these victims were male (34 victims), and 26 victims were female. (Table 7)

    Murder accounted for almost two-thirds (61%) of all recorded Homicide offences (39 victims). For Murders:

    • Most occurred at a residential location (90% or 35 victims)
    • 14% involved the use of a knife (9 victims) (Tables 6–9)
       

    ​​​​​​​Assault

    In 2018 the number of victims of Assault decreased for the second consecutive year, down 5% (or 1,645 victims) since 2017 to 28,933. (Table 6)

    More than half of Assault victims in Western Australia were female in 2018 (58% or 16,890 female victims). Almost a third of female victims (31%) were aged between 25 and 34 years (5,289 victims). (Table 7)

    The majority (63%) of Assaults took place at a residential location (18,268 victims). Most (81%) did not involve the use of a weapon (23,379 victims). (Tables 8 and 9)

    ​​​​​​​Robbery

    Since 2017 the number of victims of Robbery increased by 9% (or 98 victims) to 1,161 victims in 2018. This was caused by a rise in both Armed and Unarmed robbery (up 28 and 65 victims, respectively). (Table 6)

    For victims of Armed robbery:

    • A quarter (25%) occurred at a retail location (134 victims) or a street/footpath (139 victims)
    • A knife was used in almost a quarter of robberies (23% or 126 victims) (Tables 8 and 9)
       

    ​​​​​​​Unlawful entry with intent

    In 2018 victims of Unlawful entry with intent in Western Australia decreased by 3,114 victims (or 9%) to 30,788 victims. This was the lowest number of victims recorded for this offence since the beginning of the time series in 2010. (Table 6)

    The majority of these victims had property stolen from a residential location (53% or 16,246 victims). (Table 8)

    Tasmania

    ​​​​​​​Homicide and related offences

    The number of victims of Homicide and related offences in Tasmania increased from 5 victims in 2017 to 7 victims in 2018. (Table 6)

    Assault

    In 2018 the number of Assault victims recorded in Tasmania increased by 2% (53 victims), from 3,193 victims in 2017 to 3,246 victims. For these victims in 2018:

    • There were slightly more female victims than male victims (51% and 49% respectively)
    • Over a quarter (26%) of all victims were aged between 25 and 34 years (828 victims)
    • The proportion of females assaulted by someone they knew (85%) was higher than male victims (58%)
    • Most commonly occurred at a residential location (55% or 1,772 victims)
    • Nearly one in five (19%) occurred on a street or footpath (609 victims)
    • Use of a weapon was reported by 17% of victims (550 victims) (Tables 6–12)
       

    ​​​​​​​Robbery

    The number of victims of Robbery recorded in Tasmania increased from 88 victims in 2017 to 100 victims in 2018. The majority (68%) of these involved the use of a weapon (68 victims). (Tables 6 and 9)

    ​​​​​​​Property crimes

    Between 2017 and 2018 the number of victims of all property crimes in scope of the collection decreased in Tasmania:

    • Motor vehicle theft down 22% (or 282 victims)
    • Other theft down 10% (or 826 victims)
    • Unlawful Entry With Intent (UEWI) down 10% (or 319 victims) (Table 6)


    The decrease was predominantly due to Unlawful entry with intent involving the taking of property which decreased by 274 victims. (Tables 6)

    Motor vehicle theft reached the lowest number (1,006) of victims recorded in Tasmania since the beginning of the time series in 2010. Just over half of motor vehicle thefts recorded occurred at a Residential location (52% or 525 victims). (Tables 6 and 8)

    Northern Territory

    Homicide and related offences

    There were 9 victims of Homicide and related offences recorded in the Northern Territory in 2018, 5 of which were recorded as Murder. (Table 6)

    ​​​​​​​Assault

    The number of victims of Assault recorded in the Northern Territory decreased by 5% (or 350 victims), from 7,715 victims in 2017 to 7,365 victims in 2018. (Table 6)

    For victims of Assault in 2018:

    • The majority (64%) were female (4,733 victims)
    • More than half (52%) took place in the community (3,857 victims) and just under a third (30%) took place in residential locations (2,236 victims)
    • Nearly three out of four (74%) knew the offender (5,438 victims)
    • 50% of victims reported the offender was a family member (3,712 victims) (Tables 7–8 and Table 11)
       

    Sexual assault

    In 2018 the number of victims of Sexual assault recorded in the Northern Territory decreased by 16% (66 victims), from 426 victims in 2017 to 360 victims in 2018. This was the lowest number of victims recorded in the Northern Territory since 2012 (325 victims). (Table 6)

    The majority (91%) of victims were female (327 victims). Most (62%) Sexual assault victims knew the offender (224 victims). (Tables 7 and 11)

    Robbery

    In 2018 the number of victims of Robbery increased by less than a third (30%) to 131 victims. This was the highest recorded number of Robbery victims in the Northern territory since the beginning of the time series in 2010. The increase in Robbery was a result of an increase in the number of Unarmed Robberies (up 61% or 31 victims since 2017). (Table 6)

    Almost three-quarters (72%) of Robbery victims were male (87 victims). Close to one-fifth (17% or 22 victims) of Robberies took place on a street/footpath. (Tables 7 and 8)

    Unlawful entry with intent

    In 2018 the number of victims of Unlawful entry with intent increased by 17% to 4,981 victims, the highest number of victims recorded for this offence since the time series began in 2010. (Table 6)

    The Northern Territory was one of only three (South Australia and Queensland) states/territories to record an increase in Unlawful entry with intent. (Table 6)

    Australian Capital Territory

    ​​​​​​​Homicide and related offences

    The number of victims of Homicide and related offences in the Australian Capital Territory decreased between 2017 and 2018, from nine to five victims. (Table 6)

    ​​​​​​​Assault

    In 2018 the number of victims of Assault decreased for the first time in four years to 2,310 victims. This decreased the victimisation rate by 28 victims to 549 victims per 100,000 persons. (Table 6)

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    The Australian Capital Territory was one of two jurisdictions (for which Assault data is published) which recorded a higher proportion of male than female victims of assault (54% or 1,257 male victims and 1,019 female victims) in 2018. (Table 7)

    Half of these male victims were assaulted by a known person (50% or 632 victims) with a further third (35%) assaulted by a stranger (442 victims). (Table 12)

    For female victims, the majority (79%) knew the offender (808 victims). (Table 12)

    Two in five (42%) Assaults occurred at a residential location (978 victims) and almost a third (31%) occurred on a street/footpath (710 victims). The Australian Capital Territory recorded the highest proportion of Assaults occurring on a street/footpath than all other jurisdictions for which Assault data is published. (Table 8)

    The majority of Assaults in 2018 did not involve the use of a weapon (88% or 2,028 victims). (Table 9)

    Robbery

    In 2018, Armed robberies continued to account for around half of all Robberies in the Australian Capital Territory (55% or 120 victims). A knife was used in two-thirds of Armed robberies (64% or 77 victims). (Tables 6 and 9)

    Motor vehicle theft

    Between 2017 and 2018 the number of victims of Motor vehicle theft decreased to 1,107 victims in the Australian Capital Territory, down 22% or 303 victims. This was the equal largest decrease (with Tasmania down 22% or 282 victims) for this offence in 2018. (Table 6)

    Just over half of motor vehicles were stolen from a community location (55% or 603 victims). Of these:

    • Around two-thirds occurred on a street/footpath (62% or 374 victims)
    • A third occurred at a transport location (36% or 219 victims) (Table 8)
       

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims of crime

    This chapter presents statistics on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Victims of crime for New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and the Northern Territory. Based on an ABS assessment, Indigenous status data for other states and territories are not of sufficient quality and/or do not meet ABS standards for national reporting in 2018.

    For the data presented here, there remained a small proportion of victims whose Indigenous status was "not stated/unknown". The proportion of unknown Indigenous status for offences may vary by offence type and from year to year. For this reason, caution should be exercised when interpreting movements in Indigenous status data. For further information, refer to the Methodology.

      Assault

      Between 2017 and 2018, the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims of Assault(1) increased in:

      • South Australia (up 12% or 239 victims) to 2,277 victims
      • New South Wales (up 4% or 171 victims) to 4,445 victims


      A decrease was recorded over the same reference period in the Northern Territory (down 5% or 254 victims) to 5,132 victims . (Table 16)

      Sex and age

      In 2018 there were more female Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims of Assault than male victims:

      • 2,764 females (62%) compared to 1,671 males in New South Wales
      • 1,620 females (71%) compared to 651 males in South Australia
      • 3,919 females (76%) compared to 1,222 males in the Northern Territory (Table 17)


      The Northern Territory recorded the highest victimisation rates in 2018, with 10,346 female victims per 100,000 persons and 3,136 male victims per 100,000 persons. (Table 17)

      Between one quarter to a third of all victims of Assault were aged between 25 and 34 years: 26% in New South Wales; 30% in South Australia; and 31% in the Northern Territory. (Table 17)

      Relationship of offender to victim

      In 2018 the majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims of Assault knew the offender:

      • 88% in New South Wales (3,907 victims)
      • 88% in South Australia (2,008 victims)
      • 85% in the Northern Territory (4,355 victims) (Table 18)


      For victims in New South Wales:

      • Over half of all victims were assaulted by a family member (53% or 3,907 victims)
      • Females accounted for the majority (73%) of victims assaulted by a family member (1,739 female victims) (Table 18)


      For victims in South Australia:

      • Over a third were assaulted by a partner (36% or 826 victims)
      • One in ten (10%) were assaulted by a stranger (217 victims). Males accounted for just over half of all victims assaulted by a stranger (56 % or 122 male victims) (Table 18)


      For victims in the Northern Territory:

      • Almost half were assaulted by a partner (46% or 2,365 victims)
      • Females accounted for the majority of victims assaulted by a partner (88% or 2,075 victims) (Table 18)
         

      Location

      For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims of Assault:

      • In New South Wales and South Australia most were assaulted at a residential location (64% and 62%)
      • A third of victims in the Northern Territory (34%) were victimised at a residential location while half (50%) occurred at a community location (Table 17)
         

      Sexual assault

      Between 2017 and 2018 the Sexual assault victimisation rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders increased in:

      • South Australia by 84 victims to 286 victims per 100,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons (which represented a total of 124 victims)
      • Queensland by 24 victims to 279 victims per 100,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons (which represented a total of 625 victims) (Table 16)


      This rate decreased in:

      • New South Wales by 55 victims to 293 victims per 100,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons (which represented a total of 702 victims)
      • The Northern Territory by 48 victims to 226 victims per 100,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons (which represented a total of 174 victims) (Table 16)
         

      Sex and age

      In 2018 the number of female victims of Sexual assault was at least four times higher than male victims across each of these states and territories:

      • 552 females compared to 151 males in New South Wales
      • 533 females compared to 96 males in Queensland
      • 107 females compared to 19 males in South Australia
      • 158 females compared to 18 males in the Northern Territory (Table 20)


      Over half of all victims were aged between 10 and 19 years in New South Wales and Queensland (58% each or 407 and 363 victims respectively). While in South Australia and the Northern Territory this age group accounted for around two-fifths of victims (43% in SA and 38% in the NT). (Table 19)

      Relationship of offender to victim

      For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims of Sexual assault in 2018:

      • The majority knew their offender (from 67% in the NT to 83% in SA)
      • The offender was most commonly identified as a non-family member across most of these states and territories (from 41% in the NT to 46% in SA)
      • In Queensland the offender was identified as a family member for around two-fifths of recorded victims (41%)
      • More females were sexually assaulted by a Stranger than males across all jurisdictions where this data was published (Table 20)
         

      Footnotes

      1. Assault data are published for all states and territories except for Victoria and Queensland (see Methodology for more information).

      Victims of Family and Domestic Violence related offences

      This chapter presents data about victims of selected Family and Domestic Violence (FDV)-related offences. The scope of this data has been limited to the personal offences of Homicide and related offences (including Murder, Attempted murder and Manslaughter), Assault, Sexual assault and Kidnapping/abduction).

      Victims of these selected offences have been determined to be FDV-related where the relationship of offender to victim, as stored on police recording systems, where an FDV flag has been recorded by police, or falls within a specified family or domestic relationship, or (for the purposes of this release, this includes Partner, Ex-partner, Parent or ‘Other family member’) (see the Methodology for details).

      For further information see the Methodology page.

        Homicide and related offences

        In 2018 over one-third (38%) of all Homicide and related offences were FDV-related (142 FDV-related victims). (Table 22)

        The majority of these were victims of Murder (66% or 93 victims), which was an increase of 14 victims from the previous year. (Table 22)

        For victims of FDV-related Homicide in 2018:

        • More than half (53%) were female (75 female victims and 65 male victims)
        • Over two-fifths (42%) were aged 45 years and over (60 victims)
        • Close to half (45%) occurred within an Intimate partner relationship (64 victims)
        • Most occurred at a residential location (92% or 130 victims)
        • A knife was the most common weapon type used (45% or 39 victims) (Tables 22 and 23)


        Western Australia recorded the largest number of FDV-related Homicide offences (37 victims) across all jurisdictions for which data is published in 2018. (Table 23)

        Assault

        In 2018 at least two out of five Assaults recorded were FDV-related, ranging from 38% in the Australian Capital Territory to 61% in Western Australia(1) . (Table 22)

        Between 2017 and 2018 the victimisation rate for Assault decreased in:

        • Western Australia – from 725 to 684 victims per 100,000 persons
        • Northern Territory – from 1,820 to 1,762 victims per 100,000 persons
        • Australian Capital Territory – from 237 to 205 victims per 100,000 (Table 22)


        This rate increased in:

        • New South Wales – from 366 to 374 victims per 100,000 persons
        • South Australia – from 413 to 420 victims per 100,000 persons
        • Tasmania - from 275 to 277 victims per 100,000 persons (Table 22)
           

        Sex and age

        In 2018 there were more female victims of FDV-related Assault than male victims across all the states and territories for which Assault data is published. This ranged from 66% in New South Wales (19,675 victims) to 81% in the Northern Territory (3,542 victims). (Table 22)

        This was in contrast to the total Assault population (which includes non FDV-related offences) where males accounted for a higher proportion of victims than females in some states and territories (New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory with 54%, or 35,657 and 1,257 victims, respectively). (Tables 7 and 22)

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        1. Victims of selected offences have been determined to be FDV–related where the relationship of offender to victim, as stored on police recording systems, falls within a specified family or domestic relationship, or where an FDV flag has been recorded, following a police investigation (see Methodology).
        2. Assault data not published for Victoria and Queensland (see Methodology).
        3. Includes FDV-related and non FDV-related female victims.


        Victims of FDV-related Assault were most commonly aged between 25 and 34 years, ranging from 22% in the Australian Capital Territory to 33% in the Northern Territory. (Table 24)

        Relationship of offender to victim, location and weapon used

        For victims of FDV-related Assault in 2018:

        • The majority of offences occurred at a residential location ranging from 42% in the Northern Territory to 86% in New South Wales
        • The proportion of weapon used during the offence ranged from 4% in New South Wales to 42% in the Northern Territory (Table 24)


        Relationship of offender to victim types:

        • Female victims of Assault were more commonly offended against by an intimate partner in all of the selected states and territories for which Assault and Relationship of Offender to victim data is published, ranging from 64% in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory to 86% in Tasmania
        • Males were most commonly offended against by an intimate partner in Tasmania (76%), Northern Territory (52%) and South Australia (49%) and most commonly by an Other family member(2) in the Australian Capital Territory (48%) and New South Wales (47%) (Table 24)
           

        Sexual assault

        There were 8,830 victims of FDV-related Sexual assault in 2018, which accounted for a third (34%) of all victims of Sexual assaults recorded nationally. (Table 22)

        This was the highest number of victims of FDV-related Sexual assault recorded for the FDV since the beginning of the data series in 2014. (Table 22)

        Sex and age

        In 2018 females were sexually assaulted at a rate six times higher than males, with 61 female victims per 100,000 females and 9 male victims per 100,000 males. This rate has been consistent since the beginning of this data series in 2014. (Table 22)

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        1. Victims of selected offences have been determined to be FDV–related where the relationship of offender to victim, as stored on police recording systems, falls within a specified family or domestic relationship, or where an FDV flag has been recorded, following a police investigation (see Methodology).
        2. Rate per 100,000 persons for the sex of interest (see Methodology).


        The majority of female victims were aged under 19 years (54% or 4,140 victims). For males this proportion was higher at 72% (or 826 victims). (Table 25)

        Relationship of offender to victim, location and weapon used

        For victims of FDV-related Sexual assault in 2018:

        • The majority of offences occurred at a residential location (89% or 7,837 victims)
        • Almost all offenders did not use a weapon (94% or 8,302 victims) (Table 25)


        Relationship of offender to victim types:

        • Most experienced victimisation within an ‘Other family member’(3) relationship
        • More females experienced victimisation within an intimate partner relationship than males ranging from 26% in Queensland to 53% in the Australian Capital Territory (Table 25)
           

        Kidnapping/abduction

        Between 2017 and 2018 the number of victims of FDV-related Kidnapping/abduction recorded nationally decreased by 8% (or 13 victims) to 143 victims. (Table 22)

        For five consecutive years females have made up over 68% of all recorded FDV-related Kidnapping/abduction victims, and accounted for 83% (or 119 female victims) in 2018. (Table 22)

        Close to half (48%) of all these victims were aged between 20 and 34 years (68 victims). The majority of Kidnaping/abductions took place at a residential location (74% or 106 victims) in 2018. (Table 26)

        Footnotes

        1. Assault data are published for all states and territories except for Victoria and Queensland (see Methodology for more information).
        2. Other family member included, but is not limited to: parents, children, siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins.
        3. Relationship of offender to victim data for Western Australia is unavailable see Methodology
           

        Inquiries

        For further information about these and related statistics, contact the National Information and Referral Service on 1300 135 070. The ABS Privacy Policy outlines how the ABS will handle any personal information that you provide to us.

        Data downloads

        Victims of crime, Australia (tables 1 to 5)

        Victims of crime, selected offences, states and territories (tables 6 to 10)

        Victims of crime, relationship of offender to victim (tables 11 to 15)

        Victims of crime, indigenous status, selected states and territories (tables 16 to 21)

        Victims of FDV related offences (tables 22 to 28)