Latest release

Work-related injuries methodology

Reference period
2017-18
Released
30/10/2018
Next release Unknown
First release

Explanatory notes

Introduction

The statistics presented in this publication were compiled from data collected in the Multipurpose Household Survey (MPHS) conducted throughout Australia in the 2017–18 financial year as a supplement to the monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS). The MPHS was designed to provide statistics annually for a small number of labour, social and economic topics. The topics collected in 2017–18 were:

  • Work-Related Injuries
  • Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation
  • Attendance at Selected Cultural Venues and Events
  • Patient Experience
  • Crime Victimisation.
     

For all topics, information on labour force characteristics, education, income and other demographics are also available.

The publication Labour Force, Australia (cat. no. 6202.0) contains information about survey design, scope, coverage and population benchmarks relevant to the monthly LFS, which also applies to the MPHS. It also contains definitions of demographic and labour force characteristics, and information about interviewing relevant to both the monthly LFS and MPHS.

Concepts sources and methods

The conceptual framework used in Australia's LFS aligns closely with the standards and guidelines set out in Resolutions of the International Conference of Labour Statisticians. Descriptions of the underlying concepts and structure of Australia's labour force statistics, and the sources and methods used in compiling these estimates, are presented in Labour Statistics: Concepts, Sources and Methods (cat. no. 6102.0.55.001).

Collection methodology

ABS interviewers conducted personal interviews by either telephone or at selected dwellings during the 2017–18 financial year. Each month a sample of dwellings were selected for the MPHS from the responding households in the LFS. In these dwellings, after the LFS had been fully completed for each person in the household, a usual resident aged 15 years and over was selected at random and asked the additional MPHS questions in a personal interview. Information for this survey was collected using Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI), and responses are recorded directly onto an electronic questionnaire in a notebook computer.

Scope

The scope of the LFS is restricted to people aged 15 years and over and excludes the following:

  • members of the permanent defence forces;
  • certain diplomatic personnel of overseas governments, customarily excluded from census and estimated population estimates;
  • overseas residents in Australia; and
  • members of non-Australian defence forces (and their dependants).
     

In addition the 2017–18 MPHS excluded the following:

  • people living in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in very remote parts of Australia; and
  • people living in non-private dwellings such as hotels, university residences, students at boarding schools, patients in hospitals, inmates of prisons and residents of other institutions (e.g. retirement homes, homes for people with disabilities).
     

Coverage

In the LFS, coverage rules are applied which aim to ensure that each person is associated with only one dwelling and hence has only one chance of selection in the survey. See Labour Force, Australia (cat. no. 6202.0) for more details.

Sample size

The initial sample for the MPHS 2017–18 consisted of approximately 26,000 private dwellings. Of the private dwellings that remained in the survey after sample loss (e.g. households with LFS non-response, no residents in scope for the LFS, vacant or derelict dwellings and dwellings under construction), approximately 71% were fully responding to the MPHS. The number of completed interviews obtained from these private dwelling households (after taking into account the scope, coverage and subsampling exclusions) was 28,200 for the Work Related Injuries topic.

Estimation methods

Weighting is the process of adjusting results from a sample survey to infer results for the total in scope population. To do this, a 'weight' is allocated to each sample unit. For the data in this publication the sample unit is a person. The weight is a value which indicates how many population units are represented by the sample unit. The first step in calculating weights for each unit is to assign an initial weight, which is the inverse of the probability of being selected in the survey. The initial weights are then calibrated to align with independent estimates of the population of interest, referred to as 'benchmarks'. Weights are calibrated against population benchmarks to ensure that the survey estimates conform to the independently estimated distribution of the population rather than the distribution within the sample itself.

The statistics presented in this publication have been benchmarked to the Estimated Resident Population for December 2017, independently produced according to the scope of the survey. This ensures that the survey estimates conform to person benchmarks by state, part of state, age and sex. The statistics have been further benchmarked to labour force survey estimates averaged over the 12 month MPHS reference period. This ensures that survey estimates are also consistent with the estimated in-scope population by state, part of state, sex, age and labour force status.

LFS estimates are revised every five years to take into account the outcome of the 5-yearly rebasing of the Estimated Resident Population following the latest Census. LFS supplementary survey and MPHS estimates are not revised in this way. Small differences will therefore exist between the civilian population aged 15 years and over reflected in the Labour Force Survey's revised estimates and corresponding estimates from other household surveys.

Reliability of the estimates

Estimates in this publication are subject to sampling and non-sampling errors:

  • Sampling error is the difference between the published estimate and the value that would have been produced if all dwellings had been included in the survey. For more information see the Technical Note.
  • Non-sampling errors are inaccuracies that occur because of imperfections in reporting by respondents and interviewers, and errors made in coding and processing data. These inaccuracies may occur in any enumeration, whether it be a full count or a sample. Every effort is made to reduce the non-sampling error to a minimum by careful design of questionnaires, intensive training and supervision of interviewers, and effective processing procedures.
     

Classifications used

Country of birth data are classified according to the Standard Australian Classification of Countries (SACC), 2016  (cat. no. 1269.0).

Occupation data are classified according to the ANZSCO – Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, 2013, Version 1.2 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Industry data are classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 (Revision 2.0) (cat. no. 1292.0).

Educational attainment data are classified according to the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0).

Work-related injuries data are classified according to Safe Work Australia's Type of Occurrence Classifications System (TOOCS). See Appendix for more information.

Comparability with monthly LFS statistics

Due to differences in the scope and sample size of the MPHS and that of the LFS, the estimation procedure may lead to some variations between labour force estimates from this survey and those from the LFS.

Data quality

Proxy interviews were conducted for persons aged 15-17 years, if an adult member of the household did not grant permission to allow the 15-17 year old respondent to personally respond to the interview. If permission was not granted, the adult member of the household would respond to the interview on behalf of the 15-17 year old. For some questions which called for personal opinions, such as self-assessed health, responses from proxy interviews were not collected.

Previous surveys

The Work-related injuries topic was last conducted in the 2013-14 financial year. Results were published in Work-Related Injuries, Australia (cat. no. 6324.0).

Changes in this issue

No changes were made to Work-related injuries topic in 2017 - 2018.

For a more detailed list of available data items and their categories – Work-related injuries 2017–18 Data Items List, is available in a spreadsheet, on the Topic page under the Data downloads section.

Next survey

The ABS is planning to collect the Work-related injuries topic again during the 2021–22 financial year.

Acknowledgement

ABS publications draw extensively on information provided freely by individuals, businesses, governments and other organisations. Their continued co-operation is very much appreciated: without it, the wide range of statistics published by the ABS would not be available. Information received by the ABS is treated in strict confidence as required by the Census and Statistics Act 1905.

Products and services

Spreadsheets

An electronic version of the tables released in this publication are available on the ABS website in spreadsheets attached to this publication. The spreadsheets present the tables and the relative standard errors (RSEs) for each publication table.

Related publications

ABS publications which may also be of interest include:

The following may also be of interest:


Current publications and other products released by the ABS are available from the Statistics Page on the ABS website. The ABS also issues a daily Release Advice on the website which details products to be released in the week ahead.

Appendix - work-related injury or illness classifications

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Work-related injuries data are classified according to the Type of Occurrence Classifications System (TOOCS) which was developed by SafeWork Australia for coding workers' compensation claims.

The work-related injury or illness classification used in this survey was based on the TOOCS nature of injury codes. The classification of how work-related injury or illness occurred was based on the TOOCS mechanism of injury codes.

Fracture

Breaking of a bone, cartilage, etc.

Chronic joint or muscle condition

Arthritis

Disorders of the joints

Disorders of the spinal vertebrae and inervertebral discs

Disorders of muscle, tendons and other soft tissues (e.g. Occupational Overuse Syndrome and Repetitive Strain Injury if this is the only description given)

Acquired musculoskeletal deformities (e.g. flat feet, mallet finger, hammer toe)

Sprain/strain

Sprains and strains of joints and adjacent muscles

Acute trauma sprains and strains

Sprains and strains of cartilage

Dislocations

Cut/open wound

Open wound not involving traumatic amputation (e.g. broken tooth, cuts, punctures, dog bites, tearing away of fingernail, serious wounds containing glass, metal or other foreign body)

Crushing injury/internal organ damage

Internal injury of chest, abdomen and pelvis

Injury with intact skin surface and crushing injury (e.g. bruises, haematomas)

Superficial injury - covers minor injuries such as:

Needle stick puncture

Abrasions, grazes, friction burns or blisters

Scratch injury from a foreign body in eye

Splinter or other foreign body in places other than eye

Stress or other mental condition

Stress

Anxiety

Depression

Nervous breakdown

Effects of witnessing traumatic events

Effects of involvement in a hold-up

Victim of harassment

Hyperventilation (hysterical, psychogenic)

Hysterical symptoms

Phobias

Obsessional and compulsive symptoms

Short term shock

Amputation

Traumatic amputation including loss of eyeball

Burns

Electrical burns, chemical burns, cold burns, hot burns, friction burns, combination burn or burns not elsewhere classified

Other

Responses that could not be included into one of the categories above such as asthma, cancer, concussion or heart attack

How work-related injury or illness occured

Lifting, pushing, pulling, bending

Muscular stress while lifting, carrying or putting down objects

Single or multiple events

Lifting or carrying resulting in stress fractures

Repetitive movement, high muscle loading

Muscular stress while handling objects

Single or multiple events

Pushing or pulling objects

Throwing or pressing objects

Stress fractures from handling objects

Continually shovelling

Climbing ladders causing upper and lower limb injuries

Muscular stress with no objects being handled

Bending down, reaching, turning and twisting movements where no objects are being handled

Stress fractures without objects being handled (e.g. from running)

Continually twisting neck with no object being handled

Repetitive movement with low muscle loading

Occupational overuse and repetitive movement occurrences

Prolonged standing, working in cramped or unchanging positions

Working in cramped or unchanging positions

Prolonged standing causing varicose veins

Vehicle accident

Any accident or incident on a private road, farm, mine site or footpath involving a vehicle where the most serious injury is sustained as a result of that accident or injury

A vehicle catching on fire after the accident

Any accident or incident in a factory, mine or car park involving a fall from a moving vehicle

Hitting, being hit or cut by object or vehicle

Hitting stationary objects or moving objects (e.g. cutting oneself while using a knife or other tool)

Rubbing and chafing from wearing footwear or clothes, using tools or handling objects

Being hit by falling objects

Being bitten by an animal

Being bitten by a snake

Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment or between stationary and moving objects

Exposure to mechanical vibration (e.g. from chain saws)

Being assaulted by a person or persons

Fall on same level

All slips, trips, stumbles, steps and jumps, even if a fall does not follow

Falls of short distances such as off a curb or into a gutter

Falls up stairs

Fall with no further description

Fall from a height

A fall from ground level to below ground level

Landing awkwardly after a jump from a height

Falling off an animal

A fall down stairs etc.

Exposure to mental stress

Exposure to a traumatic event

Exposure to workplace or occupational violence (e.g. victim of assault or threatened assault by a person or persons, being a victim of or witnessing hold-ups etc.)

Being a victim of sexual, racial, or other verbal harassment

Work pressure (e.g. mental stress arising from work responsibilities, conflict with peers, performance counselling)

Attempted suicide

Other mental stress factors

Long term exposure to sound

Long term exposure to workshop or factory noise, sharp sudden sounds, or low frequency (subsonic pressure) sounds

Contact with a chemical or substance

Single contact with chemical or substance

Immediate allergic reactions to a substance

Splash with acid

Caustic or corrosive substances in the eyes

Contact dermatitis

Swallowing chemical substances

Exposure to smoke from a bush fire, chemical fire etc.

Long term contact with chemicals or substances

Acquired allergic reactions

Slow poisoning, as with lead or other heavy metals

Long term inhalation of dust or fibres, as with asbestos fibres

Exposure to cigarette smoke

Insect and spider bites and stings

Contact with poisonous parts of plant or marine life (e.g. blue ringed octopus, bluebottles, stone fish etc.)

Other and unspecified contact with chemical or substance

Other

Those responses that could not be included into one of the categories above such as contact with hot food/drink/beverages, exposure to extreme weather, jumping on objects, struck by lightning or sunburn

Technical note - data quality

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Reliability of the estimates

The estimates in this publication are based on information obtained from a sample survey. Any data collection may encounter factors, known as non-sampling error, which can impact on the reliability of the resulting statistics. In addition, the reliability of estimates based on sample surveys are also subject to sampling variability. That is, the estimates may differ from those that would have been produced had all persons in the population been included in the survey.

Non-sampling error

Non-sampling error may occur in any collection, whether it is based on a sample or a full count such as a census. Sources of non-sampling error include non-response, errors in reporting by respondents or recording of answers by interviewers and errors in coding and processing data. Every effort is made to reduce non-sampling error by careful design and testing of questionnaires, training and supervision of interviewers, and extensive editing and quality control procedures at all stages of data processing.

Sampling error

Sampling error is the difference between the published estimates, derived from a sample of persons, and the value that would have been produced if the total population (as defined by the scope of the survey) had been included in the survey. One measure of the sampling error is given by the standard error (SE), which indicates the extent to which an estimate might have varied by chance because only a sample of persons was included. There are about two chances in three (67%) that a sample estimate will differ by less than one SE from the number that would have been obtained if all persons had been surveyed, and about 19 chances in 20 (95%) that the difference will be less than two SEs.

Another measure of the likely difference is the relative standard error (RSE), which is obtained by expressing the SE as a percentage of the estimate.

\(R S E \%=\left(\frac{S E}{estimate}\right) \times 100\)

RSEs for count estimates have been calculated using the Jackknife method of variance estimation. This involves the calculation of 30 'replicate' estimates based on 30 different subsamples of the obtained sample. The variability of estimates obtained from these subsamples is used to estimate the sample variability surrounding the count estimate.

The Excel spreadsheets in the Data downloads section on the Key findings page contain all the tables produced for this release and the calculated RSEs for each of the estimates.

Only estimates (numbers or percentages) with RSEs less than 25% are considered sufficiently reliable for most analytical purposes. However, estimates with larger RSEs have been included. Estimates with an RSE in the range 25% to 50% should be used with caution while estimates with RSEs greater than 50% are considered too unreliable for general use. All cells in the Excel spreadsheets with RSEs greater than 25% contain a comment indicating the size of the RSE. These cells can be identified by a red indicator in the corner of the cell. The comment appears when the mouse pointer hovers over the cell.

Another measure is the Margin of Error (MOE), which shows the largest possible difference that could be between the estimate due to sampling error and what would have been produced had all persons been included in the survey with a given level of confidence. It is useful for understanding and comparing the accuracy of proportion estimates.

Where provided, MOEs for estimates are calculated at the 95% confidence level. At this level, there are 19 chances in 20 that the estimate will differ from the population value by less than the provided MOE. The 95% MOE is obtained by multiplying the SE by 1.96.

\(M O E=S E \times 1.96\)

Calculation of standard error

Standard errors can be calculated using the estimates (counts or percentages) and the corresponding RSEs. See What is a Standard Error and Relative Standard Error, Reliability of estimates for Labour Force data for more details.

Proportions and percentages

Proportions and percentages formed from the ratio of two estimates are also subject to sampling errors. The size of the error depends on the accuracy of both the numerator and the denominator. A formula to approximate the RSE of a proportion is given below. This formula is only valid when x is a subset of y:

\(R S E\left(\frac{x}{y}\right) \approx \sqrt{[R S E(x)]^{2}-[R S E(y)]^{2}}\)

Differences

The difference between two survey estimates (counts or percentages) can also be calculated from published estimates. Such an estimate is also subject to sampling error. The sampling error of the difference between two estimates depends on their SEs and the relationship (correlation) between them. An approximate SE of the difference between two estimates (x-y) may be calculated by the following formula:

\(S E(x-y) \approx \sqrt{[S E(x)]^{2}+[S E(y)]^{2}}\)

While this formula will only be exact for differences between separate and uncorrelated characteristics or sub populations, it provides a good approximation for the differences likely to be of interest in this publication.

Significance testing

A statistical significance test for a comparison between estimates can be performed to determine whether it is likely that there is a difference between the corresponding population characteristics. The SE of the difference between two corresponding estimates (x and y) can be calculated using the formula shown above in the Differences section. This SE is then used to calculate the following test statistic:

\(\left(\frac{x-y}{S E(x-y)}\right)\)

If the value of this test statistic is greater than 1.96 then there is evidence, with a 95% level of confidence, of a statistically significant difference in the two populations with respect to that characteristic. Otherwise, it cannot be stated with confidence that there is a real difference between the populations with respect to that characteristic.

Glossary

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Applied for workers' compensation

To have formally applied for workers' compensation by completing an application for compensation.

Contributing family workers

People who work without pay, in an economic enterprise operated by a relative.

Current job

A job that a person was working in during the reference week which had lasted or was likely to last for a period of two weeks or more.

Current main job

The job that a person was working in during the reference week in which most hours were usually worked.

Current other job

Refers to a current job other than the current main job.

Days or shifts absent from work

Includes all work hours spent on medical consultation, hospitalisation and rest due to the injury or illness. The days or shifts absent do not have to be consecutive.

Duration of current main job

Length of time worked in current main job.

Duration of employment in job where most recent work-related injury or illness occurred

Length of time worked in job where most recent work-related injury or illness occurred.

Level of highest educational attainment

Level of highest educational attainment identifies the highest achievement a person has attained in any area of study. It is not a measurement of the relative importance of different fields of study but a ranking of qualifications and other educational attainments regardless of the particular area of study or the type of institution in which the study was undertaken. It is categorised according to the Australian Standard Classification of Education, 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0) Level of education classification.

Employed

People aged 15 years and over who, during the reference week:

  • worked for one hour or more for pay, profit, commission or payment in kind, in a job or business or on a farm (comprising employees, employers and own account workers); or
  • worked for one hour or more without pay in a family business or on a farm (i.e. contributing family workers); or
  • were employees who had a job but were not at work and were:
  • away from work for less than four weeks up to the end of the reference week; or
  • away from work for more than four weeks up to the end of the reference week and received pay for some or all of the four week period to the end of the reference week; or
  • away from work as a standard work or shift arrangement; or
  • on strike or locked out; or
  • on workers' compensation and expected to return to their job; or
  • were employers or own account workers who had a job, business or farm, but were not at work.
     

Employees

People who work for a public or private employer and receive remuneration in wages, salary, on a commission basis (with or without a retainer), tips, piece rates, or payment in kind. From August 2014, the Work Related Injuries (WRI) Survey definition of employees differs from the definition used in surveys prior to July 2014 including, the Labour Force Survey, other household surveys.

Employees with paid leave entitlements

Employees who were entitled to either paid sick leave or paid holiday leave (or both).

Employees without paid leave entitlements

Employees who were not entitled to, or did not know whether they were entitled to, paid sick and paid holiday leave.

Employers

People who operate their own unincorporated economic enterprise or engage independently in a profession or trade, and hire one or more employees.

Financial assistance

Monetary assistance received from any party to cover medical expenses or income loss, incurred due to their work-related injury or illness.

Fixed term contract

See 'Worked on a fixed-term contract'.

Full-time workers

Employed persons who usually worked 35 hours or more a week (in all jobs) and others who, although usually working less than 35 hours a week, worked 35 hours or more during the reference week.

Incorporated enterprise

An enterprise which is registered as a separate legal entity to its members or owners (also known as a limited liability company).

Industry

In this publication, industry relates to a group of businesses or organisations that perform similar sets of activities in terms of the production of goods or services. Industry is classified according to Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 (Revision 2.0) (cat. no. 1292.0).

Injury or illness sustained

See 'Work-related injury or illness'.

Last 12 months

The 12 months up to and including the survey reference week.

Main job

The job in which most hours are usually worked.

Multiple jobholder

People who worked in more than one job or business during the survey reference week, excluding those who only worked in more than one job because they had changed jobs during the reference week.

Non-school qualification

Non-school qualifications are awarded for educational attainments other than those of pre-primary, primary or secondary education. They include qualifications at the Postgraduate Degree Level, Master Degree Level, Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate Level, Bachelor Degree Level, Advanced Diploma and Diploma level, and Certificates I, II, III and IV levels. Non-school qualifications may be attained concurrently with school qualifications.

Not employed

People who are either unemployed or not in the labour force.

Not in the labour force

People who are not in the categories 'employed' or 'unemployed' as defined.

Occupation

In this publication, occupation relates to a collection of jobs that are sufficiently similar in their main tasks to be grouped together for the purposes of classification. Occupation is classified according to ANZSCO - Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, 2013, Version 1.2 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Owner managers of incorporated enterprises (OMIEs)

Persons who work in their own incorporated enterprise, that is, a business entity which is registered as a separate legal entity to its members or owners (may also be known as a limited liability company).

An owner manager of an incorporated enterprise may or may not hire one or more employees in addition to themselves and/or other owners of that business. See Status in employment for more information.

Owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (OMUEs)

A person who operates his or her own unincorporated enterprise or engages independently in a profession or trade.

An owner manager of an unincorporated enterprise may or may not hire one or more employees in addition to themselves and/or other owners of that business. See Status in employment for more information.

Paid leave entitlements

The entitlement of employees (excluding owner managers or incorporated enterprises) to either paid holiday leave or paid sick leave (or both) in their job. People employed in their own business or who were contributing family workers were not asked about their leave entitlements.

Previous job

The last job in which employment ceased during the last 12 months.

Reference week

The week preceding the week in which the interview was conducted.

Shift arrangements

A system of working whereby the daily hours of operation at the place of employment are split into at least two set work periods (shifts), for different groups of workers.

Shift work

Worked under shift arrangements.

Status of employment

Status of employment is determined by an employed person's position in relation to their job, and is usually in respect to a person's main job if they hold more than one job.

Employed persons are classified according to the reported relationship between the person and the enterprise for which they work, together with the legal status of the enterprise where this can be established. The groups include:

  • Employees
  • Owner manager of incorporated enterprise (OMIEs) with employees;
  • Owner manager of incorporated enterprise (OMIEs) without employees;
  • Owner manager of unincorporated enterprise (OMUEs) with employees;
  • Owner manager of unincorporated enterprise (OMUEs) without employees; and
  • Contributing family workers.
     

Unemployed

Persons who were not employed during the reference week, and:

  • had actively looked for full-time or part-time work at any time in the four weeks up to the end of the reference week and;
  • were available for work in the reference week; or
  • were waiting to start a new job within four weeks from the end of the reference week and could have started in the reference week if the job had been available then.
     

Usual hours worked

The hours usually worked per week by an employed person.

Unincorporated enterprise

A business entity in which the owner and the business are legally inseparable, so that the owner is liable for any business debts that are incurred.

Worked at some time in the last 12 months

People who worked in a job which lasted for two weeks or more, in the last 12 months, regardless of whether they worked full-time or part-time.

Worked full-time

People who usually worked 35 hours or more per week in the job in which the work-related injury or illness occurred.

Worked part-time

People who usually worked less than 35 hours or more per week in the job in which the work-related injury or illness occurred.

Workers' compensation

Workers' compensation includes:

  • payments by an insurer or other liable party for costs related to a work-related injury or illness:
  • medical payments, incapacity payments (income maintenance and salary top-up), rehabilitation payments, travel payments and legal payments; and
  • any 'settlement' or 'judgement of claim'.
     

Work-related injury or illness

Any injury or illness or disease which first occurred in the last 12 months, where a person suffers either physically or mentally from a condition that has arisen out of, or in the course of, employment.

The injury or illness was considered to be in scope if the respondent first became aware of it in the last 12 months, even though the cause of the injury or illness may have occurred outside the 12 month reference period. Included are injuries or illnesses that occurred while commuting to and from work, outside the place of work but while on work duty, or during work breaks.

Information was collected about the respondent's most recent work-related injury or illness if there was more than one work-related injury or illness in the reference period.

Works on a contract basis

Owner managers who were engaged by an organisation to provide a particular service or undertake a particular task at an agreed price or rate, and generally for a specified period.

Worked on a fixed-term contract

Employees (excluding owner managers of incorporated enterprises) with a contract of employment which specifies that the employment will be terminated on a particular date or on completion of a specific task.

Quality declaration

Institutional environment

For information on the institutional environment of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), including the legislative obligations of the ABS, financing and governance arrangements, and mechanisms for scrutiny of ABS operations, please see ABS Institutional Environment.

Relevance

Relevance relates to the degree to which statistical information meets the needs of users. It involves client liaison, program review, priority setting and assuring that the statistics produced together with the underlying concepts conform with international statistical standards. The ABS regularly reviews its statistical programs to ensure that they remain relevant to user needs. For the work-related injuries topic, this happens primarily through the Labour Statistics Advisory Group and in consultation with key clients.

The concepts, definitions and classifications used in the work-related injuries topic help to ensure its relevance to clients. Work-related injuries data are classified according to the Type of Occurrence Classification System which is maintained by Safe Work Australia for coding workers' compensation claims. This includes a classification for the injury or illness itself, and a classification for how the injury or illness occurred. Other classifications, concepts and definitions used in this publication are consistent with those used in Labour Force, Australia (cat. no. 6202.0).

Data on work-related injuries were collected as part of the 2017-18 Multipurpose Household Survey (MPHS). The MPHS is a supplement to the monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS) and is designed to collect annual statistics on a small number of self-contained topics. The scope of the LFS is restricted to people aged 15 years and over and excludes members of the permanent defence forces; certain diplomatic personnel of overseas governments usually excluded from census and estimated resident populations; overseas residents in Australia; and members of non-Australian defence forces (and their dependants). The 2017-18 MPHS excluded people living in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and people living in non-private dwellings such as hotels, university residences, students at boarding schools, patients in hospitals, inmates of prisons and residents of other institutions (e.g. retirement homes, homes for persons with disabilities).

Timeliness

The timeliness of statistical information refers to the delay between the reference period to which the information pertains and the date on which the information is made available. Work-Related Injuries, Australia (cat. no. 6324.0) is published approximately 5 months after the end of the enumeration period.

Accuracy

For sample surveys, accuracy describes how close a statistical estimate is likely to be to its true value. The accuracy of statistical estimates in sample surveys can be impacted by two types of error: non-sampling error and sampling error.

Non-sampling error arises from inaccuracies in collecting, recording and processing the data. Non-sampling error may also arise because information cannot be obtained from all persons selected in the survey. Every effort has been made to minimise non-sampling error for work-related injuries by designing effective questionnaires, providing appropriate training for interviewers, and undertaking good data processing procedures.

Sampling error occurs because a sample of the population of interest is surveyed, rather than the entire population. One measure of the likely difference resulting from not including all dwellings in the survey is given by the standard error (SE). There are about two chances in three that a sample estimate will differ by less than one SE from the figure that would have been obtained if all dwellings had been included in the survey, and about 19 chances in 20 that the difference will be less than two SEs. Measures of the relative standard errors (RSE) of the estimates for this survey are included with this release.

Only estimates (numbers and proportions) with RSEs less than 25% are considered sufficiently reliable for most purposes. Estimates with RSEs between 25% to 50% are annotated to indicate they are subject to high sample variability and should be used with caution. In addition, estimates with RSEs greater than 50% are annotated to indicate they are considered too unreliable for general use.

Coherence

Coherence of statistical data includes coherence between different data items pertaining to the same point in time, coherence between the same data item for different points in time, and coherence between various jurisdictions.

Data on occupational injuries and illnesses are also compiled by SafeWork Australia using information supplied by Commonwealth, state and territory work cover authorities. Like the ABS work-related injuries data, this information is also disseminated using the Type of Occurrence Classification System. However, the population covered by the ABS estimates differs from SafeWork Australia's as it includes injuries sustained by all categories of employed workers; injuries that have been claimed under workers' compensation; and injuries that have not been claimed under workers' compensation.

Information in Work-Related Injuries, Australia (cat. no. 6324.0) uses the same standards, definitions and classifications that are used in Labour Force, Australia (cat. no. 6202.0), however estimates are not directly comparable due to differences in the scope and sample of the MPHS and the LFS.

International recommendations on the concepts associated with work-related hazards and risks are made by the International Conferences of Labour Statisticians (ICLS). While the terminology used in the ABS work-related injuries topic differs from that used in the international standards, the underlying definitions are broadly consistent. More information, refer to Occupational Injuries and Diseases, Labour Statistics: Concepts, Sources and Methods (cat. no. 6102.0.55.001).

Interpretability

To aid in the interpretation of the data, detailed explanatory notes, technical notes and definitions are provided with the publication.

Accessiblity

For the 2017–18 release, tables and associated RSEs are available in spreadsheet form on the ABS website.

For further information about ABS data available on request, contact the National Information and Referral Centre on 1300 135 070 or via email to client.services@abs.gov.au.