2021 Census

Australia’s next national Census will be held in August 2021. The Census is a snapshot of who we are. It’s used to inform many things, from planning schools, healthcare and roads to local services for individuals, families and communities.

Data collected in the Census helps governments, businesses, not for profit and community organisations across the country make informed decisions. In the past, Census data has been used to plan and deliver a variety of services across Australia.

The Planning the Census publication provides more information on how the ABS will run the 2021 Census and how the ABS will protect the privacy and confidentiality of the information provided.

The ABS will also introduce new questions in the 2021 Census; the first changes to questions collected in the Census since 2006. The Review of 2021 Census topics provides more information on the process and questions.

The ABS is conducting a major Census Test in October 2020. The test, which checks the ABS’ operational processes, is run in a number of locations across Australia. It provides temporary short-term employment opportunities that allow people to earn extra income while helping their community. Read more here; Welcome to the 2020 Census Test

Learn about how community organisations use Census data through our ‘Your Census Counts’ videos.

Other Census publications

Census Privacy Impact Assessments
The ABS has released the findings, and ABS responses, of two independent Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) looking at the way the 2021 Census will be run.

Value of the Australian Census
Lateral Economics has released an independent valuation of the Australian Census, which found that for every $1 invested in the Census, $6 of value was generated to the Australian economy.

Administrative Data Research
The ABS is researching how administrative data could improve the Australian Census.

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Get the latest statistics from ABS by following us on Twitter and Facebook at @ABSstats and LinkedIn at Australian Bureau of Statistics.

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