4906.0 - Personal Safety, Australia, 2016  
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EXPERIENCE OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT – CURRENT STATE OR TERRITORY OF USUAL RESIDENCE

The PSS collects information about a person’s state or territory of usual residence at the time of interview, although this is not necessarily the state or territory in which the sexual harassment took place.

The PSS was not designed to produce violence prevalence data at the state and territory level for men, however, some data was able to be produced for the larger population states (New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia). Care should still be used when interpreting this data. Endnote 1 For more information on Sample Design, refer to the Methodology page in the Personal Safety Survey, Australia: User Guide, 2016 (cat. no. 4906.0.55.003).


WOMEN’S EXPERIENCE OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS

In 2016, the proportion of women that experienced sexual harassment by a male perpetrator varied from 14% in New South Wales and South Australia, to 21% in the Northern Territory. Women were less likely to experience sexual harassment by a female, with the proportion varying from 3.5% in South Australia to 5.4% in the Northern Territory. Refer to Table 1 of the State and Territory Tables.

Graph Image for WOMEN AGED 18 YEARS AND OVER, Experience of sexual harassment(a) by sex of perpetrator, States and territories, 2016

Footnote(s): (a) In the 12 months prior to the survey.

Source(s): Personal Safety Survey, 2016




MEN’S EXPERIENCE OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS

In 2016, the proportion of men that experienced sexual harassment by a female perpetrator varied from 5.6% in Victoria to 10% in South Australia. The proportion of men that experienced sexual harassment by a male perpetrator varied from 3.6% in Queensland to 6.3% in Victoria. Refer to Table 1 of the State and Territory Tables.

Graph Image for MEN AGED 18 YEARS AND OVER, Experience of sexual harassment(a) by sex of perpetrator, Selected states(b), 2016

Footnote(s): (a) In the 12 months prior to the survey. (b) The PSS was not designed to produce prevalence data at the state and territory level for men, some data was able to be produced for the larger population states (New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia).

Source(s): Personal Safety Survey, 2016




PREVALENCE OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT SINCE 2012 Endnote 2

Between 2012 and 2016, Victoria and New South Wales were the only states that experienced a change in the proportion of women who experienced sexual harassment in the last 12 months. Refer to Table 2 of the State and Territory Tables.
  • In Victoria, the proportion of women who experienced sexual harassment by a male perpetrator increased from 14% in 2012 to 19% in 2016, whilst the proportion of women who experienced sexual harassment by a female perpetrator increased from 3.0% in 2012 to 4.7% in 2016.
  • In New South Wales, the proportion of women who experienced sexual harassment by a female perpetrator increased from 2.0% in 2012 to 4.0% in 2016.

Graph Image for WOMEN AGED 18 YEARS AND OVER, Sexual harassment(a) by sex of perpetrator, States and territories, 2012 and 2016(b)

Footnote(s): (a) Experience of sexual harassment in the 12 months prior to the survey.(b) In order to accurately capture the emerging trends in experiences of sexual harassment (such as the use of information and communications technology), new sexual harassment behaviours have been specifically included in the 2016 PSS. Although these behaviours may have previously been collected as part of other categories, this should be considered when comparing sexual harassment prevalence rates between the 2012 and 2016 iterations of the survey. Refer to the Sexual Harassment chapter of the Personal Safety Survey, Australia: User Guide, 2016 (cat. no. 4906.0.55.003).

Source(s): Personal Safety Survey, 2016



Between 2012 and 2016, the following states experienced an increase in the proportion of men who experienced sexual harassment:
  • In New South Wales, the proportion of men who experienced sexual harassment by a female perpetrator increased from 3.4% in 2012 to 6.6% in 2016.
  • In South Australia, the proportion of men who experienced sexual harassment by a female perpetrator increased from 3.3% in 2012 to 10% in 2016.
  • In Victoria, the proportion of men who experienced sexual harassment by a male perpetrator increased from 4.0% in 2012 to 6.3% in 2016.

Graph Image for MEN AGED 18 YEARS AND OVER, Sexual harassment(a) by sex of perpetrator, Selected states(b), 2012 and 2016(c)

Footnote(s): (a) Experience of sexual harassment in the 12 months prior to the survey. (b) Whilst the PSS was not designed to produce prevalence data at the state and territory level for men, some data was able to be produced for the larger population states (New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia). (c) In order to accurately capture the emerging trends in experiences of sexual harassment (such as the use of information and communications technology), new sexual harassment behaviours have been specifically included in the 2016 PSS. Although these behaviours may have previously been collected as part of other categories, this should be considered when comparing sexual harassment prevalence rates between the 2012 and 2016 iterations of the survey. Refer to the Sexual Harassment chapter of the Personal Safety Survey, Australia: User Guide, 2016 (cat. no. 4906.0.55.003).

Source(s): Personal Safety Survey, 2016




ENDNOTES

Endnote 1

While data for men has been produced for the larger population states (New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia), the reliability of this data may vary, and users should remain aware of RSEs and/or MoEs when interpreting this data.

Endnote 2

In order to accurately capture the emerging trends in experiences of sexual harassment (such as the use of information and communications technology), new sexual harassment behaviours have been specifically included in the 2016 PSS. Although these behaviours may have previously been collected as part of other categories, this should be considered when comparing sexual harassment prevalence rates between the 2012 and 2016 iterations of the survey.