4364.0.55.001 - National Health Survey: First Results, 2017-18  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 27/03/2019   
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Queensland

How did people in Queensland rate their health in 2017-18?

  • More than half (53.8%) of people aged 15 years and over considered themselves to be in excellent or very good health.
  • One in seven (13.9%) adults aged 18 years and over experienced high or very high levels of psychological distress.

Chronic conditions (Persons, all ages)

Chronic health conditions experienced in Queensland in 2017-18 were:
  • Mental and behavioural conditions - 1.1 million people (22.7%)
  • Back problems - 807,000 people (16.8%)
  • Arthritis - 676,000 people (14.1%)
  • Asthma - 572,200 people (11.9%)
  • Heart, stroke and vascular disease - 226,000 people (4.7%)
  • Diabetes mellitus - 217,300 people (4.5%)
  • Osteoporosis - 180,700 people (3.8%)
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) - 163,800 people (3.4%)
  • Cancer - 78,100 people (1.6%)
  • Kidney disease - 47,000 people (1.0%)

Queensland had higher rates of Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (3.4% compared with 2.5%) and Mental and behavioural conditions (22.7% compared with 20.1%) compared with Australia. All other conditions were similar to the national rate.

Mental and behavioural conditions
  • In 2017-18, one in five (22.7%) people had a mental or behavioural condition, which was an increase since 2014-15 (18.1%).
  • This was due to increases in both anxiety-related conditions (from 12.2% to 15.6%) and depression or feelings of depression (from 9.4% to 12.4%).
  • Since 2014-15, anxiety-related conditions have increased in people aged 0-24 years from 10.3% to 14.5%. At the same time, people aged 45-64 years have observed increases in rates of anxiety-related conditions from 13.7% to 18.1% and depression or feelings of depression from 12.6% to 17.0%.
  • Females were more likely than males to have an anxiety-related condition (17.9% compared with 13.0%) while rates of depression or feelings of depression were similar (13.5% and 11.4% respectively).
  • Compared with 2014-15, rates of depression or feelings of depression have increased for both males (from 8.2% to 11.4%) and females (from 10.9% to 13.5%), while anxiety-related conditions have only increased for females (from 14.0% to 17.9%).

Health risk factors

Smoking

Adults (18 years and over)
  • Around one in seven (14.9%) adults were daily smokers. This rate has decreased since 2011-12 (17.8%), although the rate has remained similar since 2014-15 (16.1%).
  • However, the proportion of adults who have never smoked has increased since 2014-2015 from 50.5% to 53.6%. This was driven by an increase in young adults aged 18-24 years where over three quarters (75.7%) have never smoked compared with 62.1% in 2014-15.
  • Men were more likely than women to smoke daily (17.5% compared with 12.3%) and women were more likely to have never smoked (61.0% compared with 45.9%).
  • Adults living in areas of most disadvantage (first quintile) were more likely to smoke daily (22.4%) than those in areas of less disadvantage (fifth quintile) (5.7%).
  • Rates of daily smoking were lower in Major Cities (13.8%) compared with Outer Regional and Remote areas (18.4%).
  • On average, current daily smokers smoked 12.8 cigarettes per day, which is just over half a pack (a pack is considered to be 20 cigarettes). On average, men smoked more than women (14.0 cigarettes per day compared with 11.2).

Queensland had a lower rate of adults who have never smoked compared with Australia (53.6% compared with 55.7%).

Overweight and obesity

Adults (18 years and over)
  • In 2017-18, around two thirds (65.9%) of adults were overweight or obese. One third (33.5%) of adults were categorised as overweight and almost one third (32.4%) were categorised as obese. Just under one third (32.3%) were within the healthy weight range and 1.8% were underweight.
  • The proportion of adults who were overweight or obese in 2017-18 has increased since 2007-08 (60.8%), however, has remained similar to 2014-15 (63.6%) and 2011-12 (64.9%).
  • In 2017-18, a greater proportion of men were overweight or obese compared with women (72.9% and 59.3% respectively). These proportions have remained constant since 2014-15 (70.7% and 56.6% respectively) and 2011-12 (72.7% and 57.1% respectively).
  • The proportion of adults who were overweight or obese in general increased with age. Two in five (41.2%) young adults aged 18-24 years were overweight or obese. By age 35-44 years, two thirds (67.5%) adults were overweight or obese and by the age of 65-74 years, the proportion had increased to just over three quarters (76.7%).

Children (2-17 years)
  • Around one quarter (24.5%) of children were overweight or obese (15.4% overweight and 8.7% obese) in 2017-18, these rates were similar for girls and boys and have remained similar since 2014-15.

Alcohol consumption[1]

Adults (18 years and over)

Lifetime risk guideline
  • One in six (17.3%) adults consumed more than two standard drinks per day on average, exceeding the lifetime risk guideline in 2017-18, which was similar to 2014-15 (18.0%).
  • Men were more likely to exceed the lifetime risk guideline than women. One quarter (25.7%) of men and around one in ten women (9.3%) exceeded the lifetime risk guideline. These rates have remained similar since 2014-15 (24.9% and 10.8% respectively).
  • Young adults aged 18-24 were less likely to exceed the lifetime risk guideline (12.0%) than those aged 65-74 years (21.1%).
  • Adults residing in Outer Regional and Remote areas were more likely to exceed the lifetime risk guideline (21.1%) compared with those living in Inner Regional areas (14.8%).

Single occasion risk guideline
  • Almost half (46.6%) of adults consumed more than four standard drinks on one occasion in the past year, exceeding the single occasion risk guideline. This rate has remained unchanged since 2014-15 (46.4%).
  • Men were more likely to exceed the single occasion risk guideline than women (57.6% and 35.9% respectively), which is similar to 2014-15 (58.2% and 34.7% respectively).
  • In general, younger adults aged 18-24 years were more likely to exceed the single occasion risk guidelines (61.3%) compare with those aged 55-64 years (39.6%) and 65 years and over (21.9%).

Queensland had a higher rate of adults exceeding the single occasion risk guideline compared with Australia (46.6% compared with 42.1%).

High blood pressure

Adults (18 years and over)
  • In 2017-18, just over one in five (21.8%) adults had a measured high blood pressure reading.

Fruit and vegetable consumption[2]

Adults (18 years and over)
  • More than half of adults (51.4%) met the Australian Dietary Guidelines for recommended daily serves of fruit (2 or more serves), whilst around one in fourteen (7.2%) met the guidelines for daily serves of vegetables.
  • Only around one in twenty (5.2%) adults met the guidelines for recommended daily serves of both fruit and vegetables.

Children (2-17 years)
  • More than seven in ten (71.5%) children met the Australian Dietary Guidelines for recommended daily serves of fruit, whilst one in seventeen (5.9%) met the guidelines for recommended daily serves of vegetables.
  • One in nineteen (5.3%) met the guidelines for recommended daily serves of both fruit and vegetables.

Sugar sweetened and diet drink consumption

Adults (18 years and over)
  • Almost one in two (48.2%) adults consume either sugar sweetened drinks or diet drinks at least once per week.
  • Sugar sweetened drinks were more popular than diet drinks with 36.0% of adults consuming sugar sweetened drinks at least once per week compared with 17.1% consuming diet drinks.
  • One in ten (10.3%) adults consumed sugar sweetened drinks daily, with less consuming diet drinks daily (5.8%). Men were more likely than women to consume sugar sweetened drinks daily (14.0% compared with 6.9%) and at least once per week (44.2% compared with 28.0%). On the other hand, men and women consumed diet drinks at similar rates both daily (5.2% and 6.0% respectively) and at least once per week (18.2% and 15.8% respectively).
  • Consumption of sugar sweetened peaked among young adults (18-24 years) with 59.1% consuming at least once per week. Rates of consumption generally declined as age increased and by 65 years and over, 19.0% of people were weekly consumers.
  • Adults aged 18 years and over living in the most disadvantaged areas (first quintile) were twice (13.8%) as likely to drink sugar sweetened drinks daily compared with 6.7% of adults living in the least disadvantaged areas (fifth quintile).
  • Adults living in Major Cities, Inner Regional Australia, and Outer Regional and Remote areas were equally as likely to consume sugar sweetened drinks daily.

Children (2-17 years)
  • Around half of children (46.4%) consume sugar sweetened or diet drinks at least once per week.
  • Sugar sweetened drinks were more popular than diet drinks with 44.2% of children consuming sugar sweetened drinks at least once per week compared with 6.0% for diet drinks.
  • One in twelve (8.1%) children consume sugar sweetened drinks daily while one third (33.1%) consume them on 1-3 days per week. By comparison, only 0.8% of children consume diet drinks daily, while 4.7% consume them on 1-3 days per week.
  • Boys were more likely to consume sugar sweetened drinks than girls, consistent with the trend for adults. Just over half (51.1%) of boys consume sugar sweetened drinks at least once per week compared with about two in five (35.7%) girls.

Compared with Australia, Queensland had higher rates of adults who consume sugar sweetened drinks daily (10.3% compared with 9.1%).

Physical activity[3]
  • Around one in nine (11.3%) 15-17 year olds engaged in 60 minutes of exercise (excluding workplace physical activity) every day, while one in nine (11.4%) did strength or toning activities on three or more days in the last week.
  • More than half (51.2%) of 18-64 year olds undertook 150 minutes or more of exercise in the last week, excluding workplace physical activity and this increased to 62.9% when workplace physical activity was included.
  • Almost one quarter (23.1%) of 18-64 year olds undertook strength or toning activities on two or more days in the last week.
  • Over two in five adults aged 18-64 years described their day at work as mostly sitting (42.3%), 21.4% described their day as mostly walking, 20.2% as mostly standing and 15.6% as mostly heavy labour or physically demanding work.
  • One quarter (25.0%) of older adults (65 years and over) engaged in 30 minutes of exercise on 5 or more days in the last week.

Queensland had a lower rate of adults aged 18-64 years who undertook 150 minutes or more of exercise in the last week, excluding workplace physical activity compared with Australia (51.2% compared with 55.4%) and also when workplace physical activity was included (62.9% compared with 65.5%).

For further information

For further information about these and related statistics see publication National Health Survey: First Results, 2017-18 (cat. no. 4364.0.55.001), or contact the National Information and Referral Service on 1300 135 070.

Endnotes

1 National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), 2009. Australian guideline to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol, Canberra: NHMRC <https://nhmrc.gov.au/health-advice/alcohol >; For more information see Glossary.

2 National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), 2013. Australian Dietary Guidelines. Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council. <https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/guidelines>; For more information see Glossary.

3 Department of Health, 21 November 2017, The Department of Health: Australia's Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines <http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/health-pubhlth-strateg-phys-act-guidelines>.