4727.0.55.001 - Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: First Results, Australia, 2012-13  
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Contents >> Physical measurements >> Measured high blood pressure


MEASURED HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

High blood pressure is an important risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and other cardiovascular diseases. According to World Health Organization guidelines, a person is defined as having high blood pressure if their systolic or diastolic blood pressure is equal to or greater than 140/90 mmHg.

The results below refer to measured blood pressure only, and do not include people who might otherwise have high blood pressure but are managing their condition through the use of blood pressure medications or other actions.
RESULTS FROM 2012–13

In 2012–13, one in five (20%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people aged 18 years and over had measured high blood pressure.

Overall, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men were significantly more likely than women to have recorded a high blood pressure reading (22% compared with 18%). Measured high blood pressure was significantly different for men and women in the 25–34 year age group (17% compared with 10%).

The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults with measured high blood pressure increased with age, ranging from 6% of 18–24 year olds to 37% of people aged 55 years and over.

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE(a) BY SEX AND AGE, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people—2012–13

Graph: High Blood Pressure by Sex and Age

CHANGE OVER TIME

Information on measured blood pressure was collected for the first time in the 2012–13 Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey.


HOW DO THESE RATES COMPARE WITH THE RATES FOR NON-INDIGENOUS PEOPLE?

After adjusting for differences in age structure between the two populations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 18 years and over were more likely than non-Indigenous people to have recorded a high blood pressure reading (rate ratio of 1.2). The difference in the overall age standardised rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people was statistically significant.

Graph Image for Measured high blood pressure(a), by Indigenous status and age

Footnote(s): (a) Measured blood pressure is 140/90 nnHg or higher. (b) Difference between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous rate is not significant for males or females.

Source(s): 2012-13 Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey and 2011-12 Australian Health Survey



After adjusting for differences in age structure between the two populations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women aged 18 years and over were significantly more likely than non-Indigenous women to have recorded a high blood pressure reading (rate ratio of 1.2). The difference in age standardised rates for men was not statistically significant.

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