4715.0 - National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey, 2018-19 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 11/12/2019   
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Key findings for states and territories


Chronic conditions

More than four in 10 (46%) people reported one or more selected chronic conditions [1]. Among the states and territories, the proportion of people with one or more selected chronic conditions was:

    • highest for people living in Tasmania (59%) and the Australian Capital Territory (57%)
    • lowest for people living in the Northern Territory (32%).


People with one or more selected chronic conditions(a), by state/territory

Graph shows the proportion of people who had one or more selected chronic conditions was highest for people living in Tasmania (59%) and the ACT (57%) and lowest for people living in the NT (32%).

(a) Includes arthritis, asthma, back problems (dorsopathies), cancer (malignant neoplasms), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, heart, stroke and vascular disease, kidney disease, mental and behavioural conditions, and osteoporosis. (b) The differences between New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia are not statistically significant. (c) The difference between Queensland and Western Australia is not statistically significant. (d) The difference between Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory is not statistically significant.

Source(s): 2018–19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey


Asthma

More than one in 10 (16%) people reported having asthma. Among the states and territories, the proportion of people with asthma was lower for people living in the Northern Territory (6%) than any other state or the Australian Capital Territory [2].

Mental health

More than two in 10 (24%) people aged two years and over reported having a mental or behavioural condition [3]. Among the states and territories, the proportion of people with a mental or behavioural condition was:
    • highest for people living in the Australian Capital Territory (40%)
    • lowest for people living in the Northern Territory (10%).


Mental and behavioural conditions, by state/territory — people aged two years and over
Graph shows the proportion of people who reported having a mental or behavioural condition was highest for people living in the ACT (40%) and lowest for people living in the NT (10%).

(a) The difference between New South Wales and South Australia is not statistically significant. (b) The difference between Victoria and Tasmania is not statistically significant. (c) The difference between Queensland and Western Australia is not statistically significant.

Source(s): 2018–19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey


Ear disease and hearing problems

More than one in 10 people (14%) reported having ear disease or hearing problems. Among the states and territories, the proportion of people with ear disease or hearing problems was higher for people living in the Australian Capital Territory (21%) than any other state or the Northern Territory [4].

Alcohol consumption

A person’s alcohol consumption risk level was assessed using the National Health and Medical Research Council’s 2009 guideline for single occasion risk [5]. More than half (54%) of people aged 18 years and over had exceeded the single occasion risk guideline (more than four standard drinks on one occasion in the last 12 months). Among the states and territories, the proportion of people who had exceeded this guideline was lower for people living in the Northern Territory (42%) than any other state or the Australian Capital Territory [2].

Around one-quarter (26%) of people aged 18 years and over had not consumed alcohol in the last 12 months or had never consumed alcohol. Among the states and territories, the proportion of people who had not consumed or never consumed alcohol was higher for people living in the Northern Territory (44%) than any other state or the Australian Capital Territory [2].

Physical activity (non-remote areas only)

Physical activity is assessed based on an interpretation of Department of Health guidelines [6]. To meet the 2014 guidelines, people needed to do varying combinations of some or all of the following physical activities, depending on their age:
    • walking for transport
    • walking for fitness, recreation or sport
    • moderate intensity exercise
    • vigorous intensity exercise
    • strength or toning activities.

Around one in 10 (11%) people aged 15 years and over met the physical activity guidelines for their age. Among the states and territories, the Australian Capital Territory had the highest proportion of people who met the guidelines (21%) than any other state or the Northern Territory [4].

More than two in 10 (22%) people aged 15 years and over had done no physical activity at all in the last week. Among the states and territories, the Australian Capital Territory had the lowest proportion of people who had done no physical activity (10%) than any other state or the Northern Territory [4].

Consultations with general practitioners or specialists

A majority of people (86%) had seen a general practitioner (GP) or specialist in the last 12 months. Among the states and territories, the proportion of people who had seen a GP or specialist was higher for the Australian Capital Territory (94%) than any other state and territory, except Victoria and Tasmania [4].


Footnotes
1. Includes arthritis, asthma, back problems (dorsopathies), cancer (malignant neoplasms), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, heart, stroke and vascular disease, kidney disease, mental and behavioural conditions, and osteoporosis.
2. Some differences between the states, and between the states and the Australian Capital Territory, are not statistically significant.
3. See Mental health and wellbeing data (appendix) for more information.
4. Some differences between the states, and between the states and the Northern Territory, are not statistically significant.
5. See Assessing health risk factors (appendix) for more information about how single occasion risk was assessed using these guidelines.
6. See Assessing health risk factors (appendix) for more information about how physical activity was assessed using these guidelines.