4715.0 - National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey, 2018-19 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 11/12/2019   
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Physical harm


Experiences of both physical and threatened physical harm have an impact on the levels of wellbeing experienced by individuals and communities.

More than one in 10 (16%) people aged 15 years and over had experienced physical harm or threatened physical harm at least once in the 12 months prior to interview [1]. There was no significant difference between males (17%) and females (14%).

Experiences of physical harm

Six per cent of people aged 15 years and over had experienced physical harm at least once in the last 12 months. The proportion was the same for males and females (both 6%).

For all experiences of physical harm in the last 12 months, a higher proportion of females (74%) than males (56%) identified an intimate partner/family member as at least one of the offenders [2].

More than seven in 10 (72%) people were physically injured in their most recent experience of physical harm. The proportion of people who were injured was about the same for males (75%) and females (72%).

More than four in 10 (44%) people reported their most recent experience of physical harm to the police. The proportion of females who reported it (59%) was more than double the proportion for males (28%).

Experiences of threatened physical harm

More than one in 10 (13%) people aged 15 years and over had experienced threatened physical harm at least once in the last 12 months. There was no significant difference between males (13%) and females (11%).

A higher proportion of people had experienced at least one threat face-to-face (9%) than non-face-to-face (6%). Face-to-face threats were more common than non-face-to-face for both males (9% compared with 6%) and females (8% compared with 5%).

Of those who had experienced at least one face-to-face threat:

    • a higher proportion of females (96%) than males (84%) had experienced at least one of those threats from someone they knew [3]
    • almost two in ten (18%) people had experienced at least one of those threats from a stranger.

Around six in 10 (61%) people who had received at least one non-face-to-face threat had received at least one of those threats via text message, phone, email or writing.


Footnotes
1. See Physical and threatened physical harm data (appendix) for more information on how this data was collected and its limitations.
2. People were able to identify more than one offender for each experience of physical harm. An offender may have been an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person or a non-Indigenous person.
3. Includes someone known by sight only.