4528.0 - Personal Fraud, 2014-15  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 20/04/2016   
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CARD FRAUD

HOW MANY AUSTRALIANS EXPERIENCED CARD FRAUD? (Tables 2 and 3)

In the 12 months prior to survey in 2014-15, an estimated 1.1 million or 5.9% of the population aged 15 years and over in Australia experienced card fraud, an increase from 2010-11 when the rate was 3.7%.

The majority of card fraud victims experienced a single incident (70% or 765,300).

WHO EXPERIENCED CARD FRAUD? (Table 8)

Males and females were equally likely to experience card fraud (5.7% and 6.0% respectively).

Persons aged 15 to 24 and 55 years and over were the least likely of all age categories to experience card fraud in the 12 months prior to survey (2.4% and 4.4% respectively).

Graph Image for Card fraud, Victimisation rates by age, Australia, 2014-15


Married persons were more likely than unmarried persons to experience card fraud in the 12 months prior to survey (6.8% compared to 4.5%).

Persons holding a degree, diploma or higher qualification (8.4%) or another non-school qualification (6.1%) were more likely to experience card fraud than persons with no non-school qualification (3.8%).

Employed persons were more likely to experience card fraud than unemployed persons and persons not in the labour force (7.2% compared to 4.7% and 3.5% respectively).

The likelihood of experiencing card fraud increased as personal weekly income increased. Persons earning $2,000 and over per week were three times as likely to experience card fraud compared to persons earning less than $500 per week.

Graph Image for Card fraud, Victimisation rates by weekly personal income, Australia, 2014-15

HOW DID PEOPLE FIND OUT ABOUT CARD FRAUD? (Table 9)

Over half (53%) of persons who experienced card fraud discovered the fraud themselves. Of those who were informed by someone else (47% or 520,300), 462,300 were informed by a bank or financial institution, 42,000 by a credit card company, and 19,400 by police, consumer affairs/ombudsman or other agency.

WAS THE MOST RECENT INCIDENT OF CARD FRAUD REPORTED? (Table 9)

Of all persons who experienced card fraud, including those who discovered the fraud themselves and those who were informed of the fraud by someone else, over half (57% or 621,700) reported the incident - 482,200 reported to a bank or financial institution, 86,100 reported to a credit card company, and a further 87,600 reported to police.

HOW MUCH WAS LOST IN THE MOST RECENT INCIDENT? (Table 9)

The majority of persons who experienced card fraud (88%) had lost, at the time of survey, around one work day (8 hours) or less dealing with the most recent incident.

Two-thirds of persons (66% or 730,500) who experienced card fraud sought reimbursement, with 655,500 receiving reimbursement and 75,000 seeking reimbursement but not receiving any. A further 104,700 persons did not seek reimbursement but received some, while 237,000 persons neither sought nor received reimbursement.

Before any reimbursement, around a third of persons (31%) who experienced card fraud had an estimated loss of $1-$100, one-quarter had an estimated loss of $101-$500 (26%), 29% had an estimated loss of $501-$5,000 and 5% had an estimated loss over $5,000.

Approximately one in ten persons who experienced card fraud (9%) indicated that they had lost money even after receiving reimbursement, with 3% losing $100 or less and 3% losing between $101-$500.

HOW DID BEHAVIOUR CHANGE AFTER EXPERIENCING CARD FRAUD? (Table 9)

Half of all persons (50% or 554,900) who experienced card fraud changed their behaviour as a result of all incidents experienced, including becoming more careful or aware (407,100), changing card details (160,300) and changing payment method (92,800).