4433.0.55.003 - Intellectual Disability, Australia, 2012  
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FAMILY AND HOUSING

The SDAC collects information on different types of living arrangements and families. People may live alone, with other family members or with other unrelated individuals. Most people with intellectual disability were living in households (547,100 people or 82%) rather than establishments e.g. hospitals and nursing homes (107,400 or 16%).

In terms of living arrangements, most people with intellectual disability were living in a family household (429,700 people). Most of these were younger people aged between 0-34 years (72%). There were also around 95,400 people with intellectual disability living alone and another 20,200 were living in a group household. People living alone tended to be older than those living in family households with 48% of people in lone households aged 35-59 years and another 21% aged 60-74 years.

When looking at different types of families, around one-third of people with intellectual disability were living in a couple family with children (33%) and one-fifth were living in a one parent family (20%). There were also around 24,400 parents with intellectual disability, who had children under the age of 15 years. Of these parents, around two-thirds (16,000) were living in a couple family and around a third (8,800) were single parents. Most of these single parents were female (6,100).

The majority of people with intellectual disability living in a health care establishment were aged 75 years or over (89,600 people or 83%). The conditions underlying Intellectual Disability in this older age group were more often degenerative (for example, 68% had Alzheimers Disease or Dementia), and the vast majority (92%) had a profound or severe core activity limitation.