4430.0.30.002 - Microdata: Disability, Ageing and Carers, Australia, 2018 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 20/11/2019   
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Using the TableBuilder

TableBuilder User Guide

This page contains information on the Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) TableBuilder. The TableBuilder User Guide (cat. no. 1406.0.55.005) provides information on how to create basic tables, custom groups, graphs and large tables. It also includes practical examples and video tutorials.

Data available

The SDAC TableBuilder dataset contains nine of the ten levels of data available from the survey. See the File Structure page for more information. The Recipient level (level 8) has not been released in TableBuilder due to the complexity of using and interpreting data on this level. The Recipient level has ‘many to many’ relationships as a recipient of care can have multiple carers and a carer can have multiple recipients of care. To discuss your data needs at this level, please contact the ABS National Information and Referral Service.

For more information about the data items available, see the Data Item List on the Downloads page.

Continuous data items

Continuous data items are available in TableBuilder from the Summation Options section in Table view. To create tables using continuous data items, create a range for the item or select sum, median or mean. Once created, ranged items can be found under the Ranges heading.

Continuous data items provide flexibility for users when creating tables. For example, see below two ranged versions of the Kessler 10 score data item, with increments of 10 and 5. Instructions and more detail on working with continuous data items can be found on the Summation options, ranges and quantiles page.

Kessler 10 score item in increments of 10 starting at 20 or less to more than 40Kessler 10 score item in increments of 5 starting at 15 or less to more than 45

Many continuous items contain special codes such as '00. Not applicable'. In these cases the data item can also be found under the appropriate level in the variable list in Table view. Special codes are automatically excluded from calculations of sums, means, medians or ranges.

The example below shows how special codes are displayed in the Data Item List. Minimum and maximum limits and the minimum increments for ranging continuous items are also detailed in the data item list.
Kessler 10 score displayed in data item list with special codes for not applicable, not asked and unable to determine categories


Multiple response data items

A number of data items allow a respondent to have more than one response. For these items, a person is counted against each category they responded to and consequently the sum of the categories may be different to the total. The table below displays the multiple response data item 'Type(s) of activity for which aid(s) or equipment used' with the Person weight. For example, a person who uses an aid for Toileting, Dressing and Eating will be counted against each of these three categories.

Multiple response data items are identified in the Data Item List in the label using the indicator ‘<multiple response>’.

Person estimates for multiple response data item Types of activity for which aids or equipment used

Understanding what is being counted

The SDAC TableBuilder has four weights available in 'Summation Options'. These weights are used to specify what is counted in tables. Tables can be created to sum to the total count of households, families, income units and people. For more information about how SDAC is weighted, see ‘Estimation methods’ on the Explanatory notes page (cat. no. 4430.0).

It is critical that the correct weight is used when creating tables. For SDAC TableBuilder the default summation is the Person weight, and without changing the summation option, all tables will automatically count the number of people in the table.

Generally, you should use the weight which corresponds to the level of analysis you are undertaking. For example, use the Household weight for items on the household level or use the Person weight for items on the person level. You can, however, select different weights for tables. When changing the summation option, or using data items from multiple levels, estimates should be considered carefully to understand what the table is counting. Some examples of interpreting data from different levels are provided below.

For the counting unit of each level of data in SDAC, see the File Structure page. For more general information, and instructions on how to change summation options in TableBuilder, see the Summation options, ranges and quantiles page.

Using a weight from a lower level with a data item on a higher level (one to many relationship)

The table below uses the family level item ‘Number of persons with a disability in family’ with the Person weight. In this table, 1,749,300 people live in a family with 2 people with a disability. As family level data is only applicable to people living in households, the 195,700 people in cared accommodation are ‘Not applicable’. The data item has also been collapsed for families with 4 or more people with a disability, using the custom data view.

Person estimates for data item number of persons with a disability in family

Using a weight from a higher level with a data item on a lower level (many to one relationship)

The table below uses the person level data item ‘Accessibility and Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA)’ with the Household weight. For geography data items, the value of the data item is the same for all people in the household. In this table, 89,600 households are located in Remote Australia. This excludes people living in cared accommodation as the household weight is applicable only to households. If the Person weight was used with this data item, persons living in cared accommodation would be included in the count.

Household estimates for person item Accessibility and Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA)

The table below uses the condition level data item ‘Type of long term condition reported’ with the Person weight, and includes only people who have Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic disorders. In this table, the total shows 2,360,800 people have one or more endocrine, nutritional and/or metabolic disorder(s), 1,065,600 people have Diabetes and 1,148,200 people have High cholesterol. As some people may have multiple conditions (e.g. Diabetes and High cholesterol), the sum of categories is greater than the total (2,760,200 versus 2,360,800).

Person estimates for 5 categories from Type of long term condition item

The data item ‘Type of long term condition reported’ has grouping categories. For example the grouping category 'Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic disorders [5]' groups Disorders of the thyroid gland, Diabetes, Obesity, High cholesterol and Other endocrine, nutritional and metabolic disorders. When using grouping categories in tables, a person is counted only once if they have multiple conditions from the same group. For example a person with both Diabetes and High cholesterol would only be counted once in the grouping category 'Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic disorders [5]'. Grouping categories are indicated by a yellow folder symbol in the variable list once you click on the original data item.

Grouping category Endocrine, nutrition and metabolic disorders and the conditions it groups (for example, disorders of the thyroid gland)


The table below splits the above example by age groups, using the conditions level item and the person level item 'Age in single years up to 100 years and over' with the Person weight. This table is weighted in the same way as above, and sums to the total number of people with one or more endocrine, nutritional and/or metabolic disorder(s). In this table, 577,700 people aged 65 years and over have Diabetes. As above, the total for each column is lower than the sum of the categories within the column, as people can have more than one of these conditions.

Person estimates for detailed categories from type of long term condition reported cross tabbed by broad groupings of age of person

The table below includes the Broad Activities level data item 'Broad area of activity where assistance is required or difficulty is experienced' with the Person weight. In this table, the total of 3,475,500 is the total number of people who require assistance or experience difficulty, as the not applicable category has not been included. As people may require assistance or experience difficulty with more than one broad area of activity, the sum of the categories is greater than the total (12,142,000 and 3,475,500).

Person estimates for data item: Broad area of activity where assistance is required or difficulty is experienced

The table below includes the Broad Activities level data item 'Whether needs assistance or has difficulty with broad activity area' with the Person weight. It excludes the 'Not applicable' category as in the above table, and these data items have the same population. As the table is counting people, a person is only counted once per category even if they need assistance with multiple activities.

For this data item, a person who needs assistance or has difficulty with multiple broad activities may be counted against both of the categories in the item (for example, someone who needs assistance with Household chores and also has difficulty with Mobility will be counted against 'Needs assistance with activities' and 'Does not need assistance but has difficulty with activities').

In this table, 2,893,400 people need assistance with one or more activity and 1,853,200 people have difficulty with one or more activity.

Person estimates for data item: Whether needs assistance or has difficulty with broad activity area

Confidentiality
In accordance with the Census and Statistics Act 1905, all data are confidentialised before release. This is to avoid releasing information that could identify individuals, families, households, dwellings or businesses.

Records are confidentialised in the SDAC TableBuilder by:

    removing or collapsing data items
    applying minimum and maximum values, and minimum increments, to continuous items
    perturbing the data
    applying sparsity rules (including zero value cells and table suppression)

Where an item triggers sparsity rules, the ‘custom data’ view can be used to collapse categories into usable formats.

Information on perturbation and sparsity can be found in the TableBuilder, User Guide (cat. no. 1406.0.55.005).


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