4316.0 - Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018-19 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 26/06/2020  First Issue
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Non-alcoholic beverages

The 2013 ADG recommends limiting the intake of sugar sweetened soft drinks and cordials, fruit drinks, vitamin waters, and energy and sports drinks and advises to 'drink plenty of water'. However, as many Australians drink beverages made from tap water (plain water, teas and coffee) the amount represented from sales of foods will significantly under-estimate the total water component of Australian diets. Nevertheless, the relative volumes and amounts of sugar from the various beverage types provide an indication of the non-alcoholic beverage choices made by consumers.

The average daily apparent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages was 334 mL per capita. The greatest volumes were from:

  • Soft drinks (150 mL)
  • Bottled water (110 mL)
  • Fruit and vegetable juices (34 mL)
  • Fruit and vegetable drinks (18 mL).


Mean daily consumption of selected non-alcoholic beverages per capita

Mean daily consumption of selected non-alcoholic beverages per capita
Source: Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018–19.


Over one-third (35%) of soft drinks purchased were of the intense-sweetened (sugar-free) variety. A further breakdown showed that while around one-half (51.5%) of cola soft drinks apparently consumed were intense-sweetened, just 13.4% of the non-cola soft drinks were sugar-free.

Overall, the proportion of soft drinks that were intense-sweetened (35%) was significantly higher than the sugar-free varieties of:
  • Cordials (16.9%)
  • Energy drinks (15.5%)
  • Electrolyte drinks (9.2%).


Proportion of sugar-sweetened and intense-sweetened, selected non-alcoholic beverages

Proportion of sugar-sweetened and intense-sweetened, selected non-alcoholic beverages
Source: Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018–19.


Energy and added sugar

The selected non-alcoholic beverages consumed accounted for 301 kJ per capita, which was just 3.4% of total dietary energy. However, the non-alcoholic beverages were the source of around one-quarter of the total available added sugar (24.2%) and free sugar (26.7%) from all foods and non-alcoholic beverages.

The mean daily consumption of added sugar and free sugar from the non-alcoholic beverages was 15 grams and 18 grams per captia respectively. The additional amount of free sugar comes from the naturally occurring sugar in fruit and vegetable juice and fruit and vegetable drinks (which is not defined as an added sugar).


Proportion of beverage types contributing to non-alcoholic beverages added sugar and free sugar

Proportion of beverage types contributing to non-alcoholic beverages added sugar and free sugar
Source: Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018–19.


Seasonality

Apparent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages was highest in the summer months, primarily driven by the purchases of soft drinks and bottled water. The December peak for soft drinks (205 grams), leads the January peak for water (147 grams) likely due to the sales of soft drinks for the festive season.


Daily grams selected non-alcoholic beverages per capita, by calendar month

Daily grams selected non-alcoholic beverages per capita, by calendar month
Source: Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018–19.