4177.0 - Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation, Australia, 2013-14 Quality Declaration 
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GLOSSARY

Athletics, track and field

Includes running (for athletics).

Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED)

The ASCED is a national standard classification which includes all sectors of the Australian education system: that is, schools, vocational education and training, and higher education. From 2001, ASCED replaced a number of classifications used in administrative and statistical systems, including the Australian Bureau of Statistics Classification of Qualifications (ABSCQ). The ASCED comprises two classifications: Level of education and Field of education. See Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0).

Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS)

Effective from July 2011, the Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS) developed by the ABS provides the framework for the collection and dissemination of statistics. See Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS): Volume 1 - Main Structure and Greater Capital City Statistical Areas, July 2011 (cat. no. 1270.0.55.001).

Balance of state/territory

Comprises the balance of each state/territory not included in Capital City. See Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS): Volume 1 - Main Structure and Greater Capital City Statistical Areas, July 2011 (cat. no. 1270.0.55.001).

Capital city

Refers to Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (GCCSA) as defined by the ASGS. The GCCSAs represent the socio-economic extent of each of the eight State and Territory capital cities. The whole of the ACT is included in the GCCSA. See Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS): Volume 1 - Main Structure and Greater Capital City Statistical Areas, July 2011 (cat. no. 1270.0.55.001).

Certificate not further defined

Survey responses are coded to Certificate not further defined (n.f.d.) when there is not enough information to code them to Certificate I, II, III or IV in the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0), Level of education classification.

Country of birth

Country of birth has been classified according to the Standard Australian Classification of Countries (SACC), 2011 (cat. no. 1269.0).

Couple

Two people in a registered or de facto marriage, who usually live in the same household.

Course/Qualification

For this survey, a qualification is the completion of a course or qualification relevant to the non-playing roles surveyed, regardless of the length of the course or the type of institution offering the course. This may include: training run by sporting associations or clubs; study at educational institutions; and attendance at workshops or seminars.

Cycling/BMXing

Includes bike riding and mountain biking.

Dancing/ballet

Includes ballroom dancing, belly dancing, boot scooting, callisthenics, dance sport, folk dancing, Latin dancing, line dancing, salsa, swing dancing and other forms of dancing.

Dependent children

All people aged under 15 years; and people aged 15–24 years who are full-time students, have a parent in the household and do not have a partner or child of their own in the household.

Deciles

Groupings that result from ranking all households or persons in the population in ascending order according to some characteristic such as their household income and then dividing the population into 10 equal groups, each comprising 10% of the estimated population.

Employed

All people aged 15 years and over who, during the week prior to interview:

  • worked for one hour or more for pay, profit, commission or payment in kind in a job or business, or on a farm (comprising employees, employers and own account workers); or
  • worked for one hour or more without pay in a family business or on a farm (i.e. contributing family workers); or
  • were employees who had a job but were not at work and were:
    • away from work for less than four weeks up to the end of the reference week; or
    • away from work for more than four weeks up to the end of the reference week and received pay for some or all of the four week period to the end of the reference week; or
    • away from work as a standard work or shift arrangement; or
    • on strike or locked out; or
    • on workers' compensation and expected to return to their job; or
  • were employers or own account workers who had a job, business or farm, but were not at work.

Employed full-time

Employed persons who usually worked 35 hours or more a week (in all jobs) and those who, although usually working less than 35 hours a week, worked 35 hours or more during the reference week.

Employed part-time

Employed persons who usually worked less than 35 hours a week (in all jobs) and either did so during the reference week, or were not at work in the reference week.

Equivalised household income

Equivalising adjusts actual income to take into account the different needs of the households of different sizes and compositions. There are economic advantages associated with living with others, because household resources, especially housing, can be shared. The equivalence scale used to obtain equivalised income is that used in studies by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and is referred to as the 'modified OECD scale'. The scale gives a weight of 1.0 to the first adult in the household, a weight of 0.5 for each additional adult (persons aged 15 years and over) and a weight of 0.3 for every child. For each household, the weights of the household members are added together to form a household weight. Total household income is then divided by the household weight to give an income that a lone person household would need for a similar standard of living. Equivalised household income can be viewed as an indicator of the economic resources available to each member of the household.

Family

Two or more people, one of whom is at least 15 years of age, who are related by blood, marriage (registered or de facto), adoption, step or fostering, and who usually live in the same household. A separate family is formed for each married couple, or for each set of parent-child relationships where only one parent is present.

Field of education

Field of education is defined as the subject matter of an educational activity. It is categorised according to the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0) Field of education classification. This publication presents the main field of education studied.

Fishing

Includes angling.

Fitness/gym

Includes boot camp, circuits, exercise biking, box exercise, kick boxing, fitness classes, gym classes, gym workouts, RPM, spin cycling, treadmill activities, weight training and zumba.

Football sports

Includes American football, Gaelic football, gridiron, Oztag, touch football and USA football.

Gymnastics

Includes acrobatics, trampolining and cheerleading.

Horse riding/equestrian activities/polo

Includes dressage, polo cross, show jumping and pony club.

Household

A group of two or more related or unrelated people who usually reside in the same dwelling, who regard themselves as a household, and who make common provision for food or other essentials for living; or a person living in a dwelling who makes provision for his/her own food and other essentials for living, without combining with any other person.

Household composition

Descriptions of the different types of household composition are provided below:

Couple only. A household consisting of a couple with no other related or unrelated persons usually resident.

Couple with dependent children.
A household consisting of a couple and at least one dependent child usually resident in the household. Related non-dependent children may also be present in the household. Households which also have other related or unrelated residents are included.

One parent with dependent children.
A household consisting of a lone parent and at least one dependent child usually resident in the household. Non-dependent children may also be present in the household. Households which also have other related or unrelated usual residents are included.

Lone person.
A household consisting of a person living alone.

Other.
Comprises all other households, including multiple family households, group households and households consisting of unrelated adults, and other one family households.

Ice/snow sports

Includes bobsledding, broomball, ice hockey, ice skating, ice racing/speed skating, skeleton, snow skiing and snow boarding.

Income

Income consists of all current receipts, whether monetary or in kind, that are received by the household or by individual members of the household, and which are available for, or intended to support, current consumption.

Income includes receipts from:
  • wages and salaries and other receipts from employment (whether from an employer or own incorporated enterprise), including income provided as part of salary sacrificed and/or salary package arrangements
  • profit/loss from own unincorporated business (including partnerships)
  • net investment income (interest, rent, dividends, royalties)
  • government pensions and allowances
  • private transfers (e.g. superannuation, workers' compensation, income from annuities, child support, and financial support received from family members not living in the same household).

Gross income is the sum of the income from all these sources before income tax, the Medicare levy and the Medicare levy surcharge are deducted. Other measures of income are Disposable income and Equivalised disposable household income.

Note that child support and other transfers from other households are not deducted from the incomes of the households making the transfers.

Index of relative socio-economic disadvantage

This is one of four Socio-economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFAs) compiled by the ABS following each Census of Population and Housing, from various characteristics of persons resident in particular areas. The Index of Disadvantage summarises attributes such as income, educational attainment, unemployment and occupation skill levels. The index refers to the area (the Statistical Area Level 1) in which a person lives, not to the socio-economic situation of the particular individual.

The index ranks areas on a continuum from most disadvantaged to least disadvantaged. A low score on the index (i.e. lowest quintile or decile) indicates a high proportion of relatively disadvantaged people in an area. Such areas include many households with low income, people with no qualifications and many people in low skill occupations. It should be noted that it cannot be concluded that an area with a very high score has a large proportion of relatively advantaged ('well off') people, as there are no variables in the index to indicate this. It can only be concluded that such an area has a relatively low incidence of disadvantage.

The indexes used in this publication were those compiled following the 2011 Census. For further information about the indexes, see Census of Population and Housing: Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA), 2011 (cat. no. 2033.0.55.001).

Indoor sports or fitness centres

Includes indoor tennis, netball, basketball etc. courts, halls and community centres, bowling alleys, indoor rock climbing walls and ice rinks.

Involvement in organised sport and physical activity

Involvement includes players and participants, as well as persons involved in non-playing roles. Respondents could have been involved in more than one non-playing role and/or as a player. Persons who were involved only as a spectator or only as a club member are excluded.

Jogging/running

Includes running for exercise.

Junior sport

Junior sport includes those sports and physical activities in which young participants are primarily grouped according to age rather than ability. There is no specific age limit applied to this definition because the age criteria for junior sport may vary from sport to sport.

Labour force status

A classification of the civilian population aged 15 years and over into employed, unemployed or not in the labour force, as defined. The definitions conform closely to the international standard definitions adopted by the International Conferences of Labour Statisticians.

Level of education

Level of education is a function of the quality and quantity of learning involved in an educational activity. It is categorised according to the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0) Level of education classification.

Level of highest educational attainment

Level of highest educational attainment identifies the highest achievement a person has attained in any area of study. It is not a measurement of the relative importance of different fields of study but a ranking of qualifications and other educational attainments regardless of the particular area of study or the type of institution in which the study was undertaken. For more information regarding how Level of highest educational attainment is derived see Decision Table: Level of highest educational attainment.

Level not determined

Level not determined includes inadequately described responses or where no responses were given.

Martial arts

Includes Aikido, Chi Kung, Judo, Jujitsu, Karate, Kendo, Kickboxing, Ninjitsu, Taekwondo and Tai Chi.

Medical support role

This role includes persons who indicated that they had been involved as a provider of medical support for organised physical activities or sports. This would include medical practitioners, physiotherapists, first aid attendants, etc.

Motor sports

Includes car racing, drag racing, go-karting, motorbike racing and speedway.

Non-dependent children

All persons aged 15 years or over (except those aged 15–24 years who are full-time students) who have a parent in the household and do not have a partner or child of their own in the household.

Non-organised sport and physical recreation

Those sport and physical recreation activities which were not organised by a club or recreation association, such as social clubs, church groups, old scholars associations or gymnasiums. Persons may participate in both non-organised and organised activities.

Non-playing roles

These roles are undertaken to support, arrange and/or run organised sport and physical activity. The six roles included in this survey are: coach, instructor, or teacher; referee or umpire; committee member or administrator; scorer or timekeeper; medical support; and other roles.

Non-school qualification

Non-school qualifications are awarded for educational attainments other than those of pre-primary, primary or secondary education. They include qualifications at the Postgraduate Degree level, Master Degree level, Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate level, Bachelor Degree level, Advanced Diploma and Diploma level, and Certificates I, II, III and IV levels. Non-school qualifications may be attained concurrently with school qualifications.

Not in labour force

Persons who were not in the categories ‘employed’ or ‘unemployed’.

Number of hours of involvement

For each role, the number of hours of involvement is an estimate of the average number of hours per week for those weeks in which the respondent took part in the role during the 12 months before interview.

Number of weeks of involvement

For each role, the number of weeks of involvement is an estimate of the number of weeks that the respondent had been involved in that particular role during the 12 months prior to interview.

Occupation

Occupation data is classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, 2013, Version 1.2 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Off-road cycleways or bike paths

Includes off-road tracks or trails that are surfaced (e.g. gravel or bitumen) or unsurfaced (e.g. dirt). Excludes on-road bicycle lanes.

Organised sport and physical activity

Those sport and physical recreation activities which were organised by a club or recreation association. The club or organisation did not need to be a sporting body; it may have been a social club, church group, old scholars association or gymnasium. Persons may participate in both organised and non-organised activities.

Outdoor sports facilities

Includes public swimming pools, outdoor tennis, basketball etc. courts, bowling greens, ski resorts, BMX tracks/courses, golf courses and athletics tracks. Excludes residential and educational institution swimming pools.

Parks or reserves

Includes open space or tracks or trails in nature areas.

Participant

Those playing a sport or physically undertaking an activity. Persons involved solely as a coach, teacher, instructor, referee, umpire, administrator or club committee member are excluded from the data.

Participation rate

The number of people who participated in an activity at least once during the year as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over. For example, the participation rate for males aged 15–17 years in NSW would be a percentage of all males aged 15–17 years in NSW.

Players

Players includes those who were involved in playing or participating in organised sport or organised physical activity at least once in the 12 months prior to interview. Persons who were players could also have been involved in non-playing roles.

Public playing fields and ovals

Grounds that consist of wide expanses of grass, dirt or sand with any marked lines, goals/goal posts or other sport-specific infrastructures, such as football fields.

Qualification

Formal certification, issued by a relevant approved body, in recognition that a person has achieved an appropriate level of learning outcomes or competencies relevant to identified individual, professional, industry or community needs. Statements of attainment awarded for partial completion of a course of study at a particular level are excluded.

Rugby league

Includes rugby league sevens.

Rugby union

Includes rugby sevens.

School sport

School sport includes those sports and physical activities that are organised by any school or college that caters for students up to and including Year 12. Participation may take place either within or outside of school hours.

Schools and educational facilities

Includes swimming pools in educational facilities.

Shooting sports

Includes hunting (with gun), bird shooting, clay shooting, crossbow shooting, duck shooting, paintball, pistol shooting, rifle shooting, running target shooting, shotgun shooting, skirmish, target shooting and trap shooting.

Skateboarding/inline hockey/roller sports

Includes rollerblading, roller derby and rollerskating.

Soccer (indoor)

Includes futsal.

Sport and physical recreation

Respondents were not advised what activities they should include as sport or physical recreation. However, activities such as gardening, housework, manual labouring and other forms of occupational physical activity were excluded.

Surf lifesaving

Includes royal lifesaving.

Surf sports

Includes surfing, stand-up paddleboarding and bodyboarding.

Swimming/diving

Includes springboard diving, platform diving and synchronised swimming.

Trail bike riding

Includes dirt bike riding.

Unemployed

People aged 15 years and over who were not employed during the reference week, and:
  • had actively looked for full-time or part-time work at any time in the four weeks up to the end of the reference week and were available for work in the reference week; or
  • were waiting to start a new job within four weeks from the end of the reference week and could have started in the reference week if the job had been available then.

Unpaid involvement

This is involvement in organised sport and physical activity for which no payment (either in dollars or in goods and services) was received or expected.

Volleyball (indoor and outdoor)

Includes Newcombe ball.

Waterskiing/powerboating

Includes jet skiing and wake boarding.