1100.2 - Statistics Victoria, Mar 2011  
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Contents >> Recent Releases >> Social and Demographic Statistics

SOCIAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC STATISTICS

On this page:
Apparent Consumption of Alcohol: Extended Time Series, 1944–45 to 2008–09
Aspects of Disability and Health in Australia, 2007–08
Australian Social Trends, March 2011
Crime Victimisation, Australia, 2009–10
Criminal Courts, Australia, 2009–10
Guide to Migrant Statistical Sources, 2011
Perspectives on Culture, March 2011
Recorded Crime - Offenders, 2009–10
Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009–10
Schools, Australia, 2010


Apparent Consumption of Alcohol: Extended Time Series, 1944–45 to 2008–09 (cat. no. 4307.0.55.002) - released 18/01/11

Data available at the following geographic level: National

This publication provides estimates of apparent consumption of alcohol based on the availability of alcoholic beverages in Australia. It provides estimates of the quantity of pure alcohol available for consumption from beer, wine, spirits, and ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages, plus estimates of the total volume of beer and wine available for consumption.

For most of the past 50 years apparent consumption of alcohol in Australia has increased, from around 68 million litres of pure alcohol in 1960–61 to 183 million litres in 2008–09. However, in per capita terms (that is, average alcohol consumption per person aged 15 years and over) a different picture emerges, with Australia experiencing periods of both increasing and decreasing apparent per capita consumption.

Over the past 50 years, the level of apparent consumption of different alcoholic beverages has changed substantially; in particular, the proportion of pure alcohol available for consumption in the form of beer has decreased (from 76% to 44%), while the proportions in the form of wine and spirits have increased (from 12% to 36% and 12% to 20% respectively).

To find out more, including information about factors affecting patterns of consumption, please visit the publication.


Aspects of Disability and Health in Australia, 2007–08 (cat. no. 4367.0) - released 04/03/11

Data available at the following geographic level: National

The aim of the publication is to analyse the health experiences of people with a profound or severe disability in comparison to those with no reported disability. The analysis aims to inform discussion and debate around health policies which impact on people with profound or severe limitation with core activities. The data is drawn from the 2007–08 National Health Survey, conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) from August 2007 to June 2008. Around 20,800 people from all states and territories and across all age groups were surveyed.

Of people aged 18 years and over with a profound or severe disability in 2007–08, 17% considered their overall health to be very good or excellent and 23% stated that their health was good. In contrast, 69% of people without a disability rated their health as very good or excellent and 26% as good. Of people with a profound or severe disability, 60% considered their health to be fair or poor, compared to 5.5% of people without a disability.

To find out more, including information about age distribution, disadvantage, personal stressors and mental health, and medication, please visit the publication.


Australian Social Trends, March 2011 (cat. no. 4102.0) - released 23/03/11

Australian Social Trends is a quarterly publication which draws together a wide range of statistics, from the ABS and other official sources, to provide a picture of Australian society and how it is changing over time.

The latest edition features the following articles:

Life Expectancy Trends - Australia
Since the late 1800s, life expectancy for Australian boys and girls has increased by over 30 years. For 2007 to 2009, girls born in Victoria had a life expectancy of 84.1 years (above the national life expectancy of 83.9 years) while boys had a life expectancy of 79.7 years (above the national life expectancy of 79.3 years).

Health Services: Use and Patient Experience
In 2009, people living in outer regional/remote areas of Australia were more likely than those living in major cities to have reported that they had waited longer than they felt was acceptable for a GP appointment (23% compared with 16%).

Health Outside Major Cities
According to the ABS 2007–08 National Health Survey, when compared against residents of major cities, people aged 15 years and over who lived outside major cities were three times more likely to die from transport accidents, almost twice as likely to die from high blood pressure and 1.3 times as likely to drink alcohol at risky levels.

Year 12 Attainment
In 2010, around 1.2 million young adults (aged 20–24 years) had completed Year 12. Over the past decade the proportion of young adults with Year 12 completion has gradually increased, rising from 71% in 2001 to 78% in 2010. In Victoria, 81% of young adults had obtained Year 12.

Education and Indigenous Wellbeing
Educational attainment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians has imnproved since the mid-1990s. In 2008, 37% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 18 years and over (adults) had attained a minimum of Year 12 or a skilled vocational qualification, more than double the rate in 1994 (16%).

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Crime Victimisation, Australia, 2009–10 (cat. no. 4530.0) - released 17/02/11

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication presents results from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' (ABS) national Crime Victimisation Survey conducted from July 2009 to June 2010. The survey collected data about victims for a selected range of personal and household offences, whether victims reported these incidents to police, characteristics of victims and characteristics of their most recent incident, and people's perceptions on social disorder in their local area.

Victimisation rates for most personal crimes decreased between 2008–09 and 2009–10. The victimisation rate for robbery fell from 0.6% to 0.4%, face-to-face threatened assault from 3.9% to 3.1%, and non face-to-face threatened assault from 1.2% to 0.8%. The level of reporting was generally similar to 2008–09, although incidents of robbery were more highly reported in 2009–10, with 61% of victims reporting the latest incident to police, compared with 39% in 2008–09.

Australian households experienced an estimated 82,900 incidents of motor vehicle theft in the 12 months prior to interview. The majority (65%) of the most recent motor vehicle theft incidents occurred at the victim's home. Victoria was the only state or territory to experience a significant decrease in victimisation rate for motor vehicle theft from 1.1% in 2008–09 to 0.6% in 2009–10.

To find out more, including information about household crime, and perceptions about social disorder, please visit the publication.
Criminal Courts, Australia, 2009–10 (cat. no. 4513.0) - released 27/01/11

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication presents nationally comparable statistics relating to the criminal jurisdiction of the Higher (Supreme and Intermediate), Magistrates' and Children's Courts across Australia throughout 2009–10. Some time series data are also included where available. The statistics describe the characteristics of defendants, including information on the offences and sentences associated with those defendants.

The number of defendants finalised––that is, all charges relating to a person or organisation for a case have been completed by the court––in the Higher Courts was the lowest in 2006–07 (16,287 defendants). In 2007–08 and 2008–09 this decline had been reversed with the number of defendants finalised in 2007–08 increasing by 3% to 16,735 and by 3% in 2008–09 to 17,207. However in 2009–10 the number of defendants finalised had dropped by 2% to 16,834.

Four states had decreases in the number of defendants finalised in the Higher Courts in 2009–10 from the previous year: Tasmania (19%), Western Australia (12%), Queensland (6%) and Victoria (3%). The remaining states and territories had increases, the largest being South Australia (23%).

To find out more, including information about the Magistrates' Courts and Children's Courts, please visit the publication.
Guide to Migrant Statistical Sources, 2011 (cat. no. 3414.0) - released 29/03/11

This publication contains summary information on a range of ABS and non ABS statistical sources either directly related to migrants and ethnicity or which collect migrant or ethnicity related data items. Details of each source's relevance to migrants and ethnicity are highlighted together with other details to assist users to assess and access data for their needs. By consolidating these data sources, the ABS aims to increase awareness of, and improve access to, migrant and ethnicity related statistics.

ABS and non ABS sources are presented by topic and by title. The 'Sources by Topic' index presents data sources according to the standard ABS Topic Framework while the 'Sources by Title' index presents sources in alphabetic order.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Perspectives on Culture, March 2011 (cat. no. 4172.0.55.001) - released 04/03/11

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

Perspectives on Culture is a new release, providing commentary on topics relating to culture and arts. This release included articles on:
  • Art gallery and museum attendance
  • Cinema attendance
  • Library and archive attendance
  • Zoological park and botanic garden attendance

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Recorded Crime - Offenders, 2009–10 (cat. no. 4519.0) - released 24/02/11

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication presents statistics relating to offenders who were proceeded against by police during 2009–10, for all states and territories. These statistics describe the characteristics of the offender, including the principal offence for which offenders are proceeded against. Data are also presented on the number of police-initiated court and non-court actions against offenders.

There were a total of 375,259 offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2009–10. This was a 5% (17,123) increase over the 358,136 offenders that police proceeded against in 2008–09. The rate of offenders dealt with by police in 2009–10 was 1,940 offenders per 100,000 people aged 10 years and over; an increase on the 2008–09 rate of 1,896 offenders per 100,000 people aged 10 years and over.

The number of female offenders increased by 4,915 (or 6%, to 84,072 female offenders) between 2008–09 and 2009–10, compared with an increase of 12,127 (or 4%, to 290,442 male offenders) in the number of male offenders. Males accounted for more than three out of every four offenders (77%) in 2009–10. Victoria reported the largest proportional increase in the number of offenders, both male and female (14% and 11% increase respectively).

To find out more, including information about principal offence, youth offenders, and court actions, please visit the publication.
Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009–10 (cat. no. 3218.0) - released 31/03/11

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory; Statistical Division (SD); Statistical Subdivision (SSD); Statistical Local Area (SLA); Statistical District (S Dist); Remoteness Area (RA); Local Government Area (LGA)

This product contains estimates of the resident populations of areas of Australia as at 30 June in each year from 2001 to 2010.

Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) reached 22.3 million at 30 June 2010, increasing by 377,100 people since 30 June 2009. This represents an annual growth rate of 1.7%, the lowest since the year ended 30 June 2006. This is the first time since 2003–04 that Australia's annual growth rate has been lower than its annual average growth rate for the last five years.

All states and territories experienced population growth in 2009–10, with the largest population increases continuing to be recorded in Australia's three most populous states. New South Wales experienced the greatest growth (up by 105,400 people), followed by Victoria (99,300) and Queensland (89,100). This is only the second time in the last nine years that Queensland has not had the largest growth of all states and territories.

Melbourne SD's growth of 79,000 people was the largest of all the Australian capital city SDs in 2009–10. The LGA of Wyndham (C), located on the western suburban fringe of Melbourne, experienced the largest and fastest growth (12,600 people or 8.8%) of all Victorian LGAs. The fastest Victorian LGA population growth outside of Melbourne occurred in coastal Bass Coast (S) (4.6%).

To find out more, including information about urban infill, growth along the coast, and population decline, please visit the publication.
Schools, Australia, 2010 (cat. no. 4221.0) - released 17/03/11

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication contains statistics on students, schools, and staff involved in the provision or administration of primary and secondary education, in government and non-government schools for all Australian states and territories, as at the schools census date 6 August 2010.

Over the past 10 years the number of schools in Australia has decreased by 132, from 9,600 in 2000 to 9,468 in 2010. In that time the number of government schools fell by 223, including a decrease of 59 schools from 2009 to 2010. Over that same decade the number of non-government schools increased by 91, with most of that growth occurring before 2005.

Across the states and territories over the past 10 years, Western Australia and the Northern Territory have increased the overall number of schools. School numbers increased in these jurisdictions by 22 and 6 respectively. Victoria had the largest overall decrease in school numbers during this period, a decrease of 73 schools.

To find out more, including information about students, Indigenous students, and staff, please visit the publication.

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