5209.0.55.001 - Australian National Accounts: Input-Output Tables, 2017-18 Quality Declaration 
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Explanatory notes

A glossary of the main terms used in the Input-Output (I-O) tables is in the link on the left. The links below contain fuller discussion of the I-O structure and compilation methods.

Explanatory notes covering the basic structure of I-O and associated tables, special treatments adopted in compiling I–O tables, and using I–O tables for analysis are shown in Australian System of National Accounts: Concepts, Sources and Methods (cat. no. 5216.0), Chapter 22, Input-Output Tables.

The I-O tables contain data formatted for presentation in millions of dollars. For use by some analysts and modellers, the data in some Excel spreadsheets contain additional decimal places to facilitate loading into other applications. Note that in the compilation of I-O tables, various modelling techniques are used to populate the tables because directly collected information is not available for every cell. As a consequence of these modelling techniques, relatively small values may be estimated in certain cells but the statistical accuracy of these data cannot be verified to a sufficient degree. Where values less than $1 million are shown, they are solely to facilitate reconciliation, row and column balancing and do not carry any economic meaning.

See also the Input-Output Quality Declaration for discussion of compilation sources and methods.


Departures from the 2008 version of the System of National Accounts (2008 SNA)

I-O tables depart from the 2008 SNA and from the rest of the Australian national accounts in one main respect - namely the definition of output at basic prices. The departure relates to the treatment of charges incurred in moving goods from their point of production to the final user, where delivery charges relating to delivery by a third party operator arranged by the producer and paid for by the producer and not separately charged to the end user are treated differently in 2008 SNA.

Under the 1968 version of the System of National Accounts (1968 SNA) these charges were excluded from the basic price valuation of the good concerned while under the 2008 SNA treatment the basic price valuation of the good includes these delivery charges. The ABS considers that the change in definition was inappropriate from an analytical point of view and would result in the same product being valued differently depending on whether or not the producer charged separately for the delivery of the product. The ABS therefore applies an adjustment to the I-O tables to reallocate delivery charges separably invoiced to transport, so including them in transport margins and reducing basic prices.

In the 2017-18 I-O tables the value of this adjustment is $46.1b. It is applied to industries and products in agriculture, mining and manufacturing and modelled based on questions on collection forms about invoicing arrangements and transport expenses.

The following notes explain the content and structure of the data in each table

Table 1. Australian production by product group by industry

This table shows Australian production at basic prices by Input-Output Product Group (IOPG) and by Input-Output Industry Group (IOIG). A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group.

For example, the row representing the product group Agriculture, forestry and fishing support services shows that $521m of this product was produced by the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $229m of this product was produced by the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $9 717m of this product being produced by all industries.

The column representing the industry group Other agriculture shows that $229m of Agriculture, forestry and fishing support services was produced by this industry, $95m of Meat and meat product manufacturing was produced by this industry and so on, resulting in a total of $26 822m of various products being produced by the Other agriculture industry.

Table 2. Input by industry and final use category and imports by product group

This table shows intermediate use by using industries (IOIG) and final use by final use categories of products (IOPG) at basic prices with indirect allocation of imports. See the Glossary for an explanation of indirect allocation of imports.

A row in the first quadrant of this table represents a product group. A row in the third quadrant represents either a primary input, Australian production, total uses, gross value added or gross domestic product. A column in this table represents either an industry group, a final use or total use category. In a balanced table, total use equals total supply. Hence the column that represents the total use (last column in the table) is termed total supply.

For example, the row representing the product group Other agriculture shows that $1 710m of domestic plus imported Other agriculture was used by the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $670m of domestic plus imported Other agriculture was used by the Other agriculture industry and so on resulting in a total of $16 347m of domestic plus imported product being used intermediately by all the industries.

In the final use categories, $8 928m of domestic plus imported Other agriculture was used by the household sector, -$16m of domestic plus imported product was used from inventories and so on, resulting in a total $11 612m of domestic plus imported Other agriculture being used in all final use categories.

In summary $16 347m of domestic plus imported Other agriculture was used intermediately by industries and $11 612m of domestic plus imported product was used by final use categories resulting in a total use of $27 959m of this product. Therefore, total supply of this product should be $27 959m which is reflected in the last column of this table.

Table 3. Imports - supply by product group and inputs by industry and final use category

This table shows intermediate use by using industries (IOIG) and final use by final use categories of imported products at basic prices.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, the row representing the product group Other agriculture shows that $17m of imported Other agriculture was used by the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $72m of imports of this product was used by the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $599m of this imported product being used intermediately by all the industries.

In the final use categories, $754m of imported Other agriculture was used by the household sector.

Table 4. Reconciliation of flows at basic prices and purchasers' prices by product group

This table shows flows at purchasers' prices reconciled with basic prices. Trade and transport margins, and net taxes on products are added to basic prices to derive purchasers' prices for intermediate and all final use categories, and for total supply. Imports are indirectly allocated in this table.

A row in the first quadrant of this table represents a product group. A row in the third quadrant represents either a primary input, Australian production, total uses, gross value added or gross domestic product.

For example, the row representing the product group Other agriculture shows that domestic plus imported Other agriculture valued at $16 347m at basic prices was used by industries intermediately. Net taxes on products and trade and transport margins associated with this intermediate use were $60m and $4 479m respectively. Therefore, domestic plus imported Other agriculture used intermediately by all the industries was $20 855m valued at purchasers' prices.

Table 5. Industry by industry flow table (direct allocation of imports)

This table shows the allocation of Australian produced industry outputs to industries and to all final use categories. This table is similar to Table 2. Unlike Table 2 however, it has industry by industry dimensions and imports are treated differently. In this table imports are directly allocated meaning they are allocated to the industries which use them and are included with the primary inputs to these industries in deriving the total production. With this method the intermediate and final use contain only the use of the domestic production and so the intermediate use matrix does not reflect the full input structure of industries.

A row in quadrants 1 and 2 or a column in quadrants 1 and 3 of this table represents an industry group. A row in quadrants 3 and 4 represents a primary input, Australian production, value added or gross domestic product. A column in quadrants 2 and 4 represents a final use category.

For example, the row representing the industry group Other agriculture shows that $1 788m of output from the industry Other agriculture was used by the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $675m of output from this industry was used by the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $15 828m of output produced by the Other agriculture industry being used intermediately by all industries.

In the final use categories, $7 783m of output produced by the Other agriculture industry was used by the household sector, $4m was used by the government sector and so on, resulting in a total of $10 994m of output from the Other agriculture industry being used by all final use categories.

Table 6. Direct requirement coefficients (direct allocation of imports)

This table shows values in a particular column representing the direct input requirements from each industry (Australian production) and from all primary inputs when Australian output of the industry or final use category, represented by the column, increases by $100.

A row in quadrants 1 and 2, or a column in quadrants 1 and 3 of this table represents an industry group. A row in quadrants 3 and 4 represents a primary input or Australian production. A column in quadrants 2 and 4 represents a final use category.

For example, the column representing the industry Other agriculture shows that this industry requires $1.29 of output from the Sheep, grains, dairy and beef cattle industry, $0.52 of output from the Poultry and other livestock industry and so on, resulting in total requirements of $43.28 output from all industries, $10.51 of compensation of employees, $40.20 of gross operating surplus & mixed income and so on to produce $100 of output.

Table 7. Total requirement coefficients (direct allocation of imports)

This table shows values in a particular column representing the total input requirements of Australian production from each industry represented by a row, by the industry represented by that column when the Australian output of the industry increases by $100.

A row or column in this table represents an industry group.

The values in Table 6 represent the direct requirements coefficients for each industry when its output is increased by $100. When an industry increases its output, apart from the direct requirements from the industries, there are also indirect requirements from the industries. The values in Table 7 represent the total requirements (i.e. initial + direct + indirect requirements) from all the industries when each industry's output is increased by $100. Another important difference between Tables 6 and 7 is that Table 7 is a square matrix whereas Table 6 is not. Because the initial effect is $100 for each industry, the total requirements coefficients in the top left to bottom right diagonal of this square table will be greater than or equal to 100.

For example the column representing the industry Other agriculture shows that the total requirements by this industry from the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry is $1.67 of output, $0.61 of output is required from the Poultry and other livestock industry and so on in order to increase its output by $100.

Table 8. Industry by industry flow table (indirect allocation of imports)

This table is similar to Table 5. Unlike Table 5 however, it describes the allocation of products, inclusive of imports, but excluding re-exports, from industry to industry and to all final use categories. That is, in Table 5, imports are directly allocated to the industries which use them and are included with the primary inputs to these industries deriving the total production. In this table imports are indirectly allocated and are included in the intermediate use of industries and in final use categories without distinguishing the imports from the products with which they compete, allowing the intermediate use matrix to fully reflect the input structures of industries. The imports in this table are indirectly allocated based on the industry to which the import is primary and the re-exports are included with the exports.

A row in quadrants 1 and 2, or a column in quadrants 1 and 3 of this table represents an industry group. A row in quadrants 3 and 4 represents a primary input or Australian production. A column in quadrants 2 and 4 represents a final use category.

For example, the row representing the industry group Other agriculture shows that $1 805m of output from the industry Other agriculture was used by the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $747m of output from this industry was used by the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $16 427m of output produced by the Other agriculture industry being used by all industries intermediately.

In the final use categories, $8 536m of output produced by the Other agriculture industry was used by the household sector, $4m was used by the government sector and so on, resulting in a total of $11 748m of output from the Other agriculture industry being used by all final use categories.

Table 9. Direct requirement coefficients (indirect allocation of imports)

This table is similar to Table 6. However, the values in this table factor in imports whereas the values in Table 6 do not. The values in a particular column of this table represent the direct requirements of supply from the industry represented by the row, when the Australian output of the industry represented by the column increases by $100.

A row in quadrants 1 and 2, or a column in quadrants 1 and 3 of this table represents an industry group. A row in quadrants 3 and 4 represents a primary input or Australian production. A column in quadrants 2 and 4 represents a final use category.

For example, the column representing the industry Other agriculture shows that this industry directly requires $1.30 of supply from the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $0.52 of supply from the Poultry and other livestock industry and so on, resulting in the requirements of a total supply of $47.58 to produce $100 of output.

To produce $100 of output the Other agriculture industry directly requires $10.51 of compensation of employees, $40.20 of gross operating surplus & mixed income and so on.


Table 10. Total requirement coefficients (indirect allocation of imports)

This table is similar to Table 7. However, the values in this table factor in imports whereas the values in Table 7 do not. The values in a particular column of this table represent the total supply requirements from the industry represented by the row, when the Australian output of the industry represented by the column increases by $100.

A row or column in this table represents an industry group.

The values in Table 9 represent the direct requirement coefficients for each industry when its output is increased by $100. When an industry increases its output, apart from the direct requirements from the industries, there are also indirect requirements from the industries. The values in Table 10 represent the total requirements (i.e. initial + direct + indirect requirements) from all the industries when each industry's output is increased by $100. Another important difference between Tables 9 and 10 is that Table 10 is a square matrix whereas Table 9 is not. As the initial effect is $100 for each industry, the total requirement coefficients in the top left to bottom right diagonal of this square table will be greater than or equal to 100.

For example the column representing the industry Other agriculture shows that the total requirements by this industry from the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry is $1.83 of output and imports, $0.62 of output and imports from the Poultry and other livestock industry and so on to increase its output by $100.


Table 17. Primary input content (total requirements) per $100 of final use by industry

This table shows values that represent the requirements of compensation of employees, gross operating surplus and mixed income, taxes less subsidies on products, other taxes less subsidies on production and imports by the industry represented by that row, when that industry uses a total of $100 of these primary inputs in the production process.

It is important to note that this takes into account the total output requirements (that is initial+direct+indirect effects) from all industries, by an industry, when this industry increases its output.

For example, $100 of total use of primary inputs by the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry consists of $26.54 of compensation of employees, $57.65 of gross operating surplus and mixed income, $1.26 of taxes less subsidies on products, $3.11 of other taxes less subsidies on production and $11.44 of imports.


Table 19. Specialisation and coverage ratios by industry

The first column in this table shows the specialisation ratios for an industry. An industry may produce a number of products, some of which may be primary to that industry and some of which may be primary to other industries. The specialisation ratio shows the proportion of an industry's output that is primary to that industry.

For example, 93.1% of output of the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry is attributed to the output primary to this industry, 95.6% of the output of the Other agriculture industry is attributed to the output primary to this industry and so on.

The second column in this table shows the coverage ratios for a product. A product may be supplied by more than one industry. The coverage ratio shows what proportion of the total domestic supply of a product is produced by the industry to which the product is primary.

For example, the entire Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle product is produced by the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry to which the product is primary, 90.8% of Agriculture, forestry and fishing support services is produced by the Agriculture, forestry and fishing support services industry to which the product is primary and so on.


Table 21. Composition of supply of products containing margins

This table shows the composition of margin and non-margin commodities in the supply of relevant products.

For example, the total Gas Supply was $5 1319m, of which $3 613m was margin commodity. Of the total $125 497m supply of Wholesale Trade, $120 041m was margin commodity and $5 456m was non-margin commodity.


Table 23. Wholesale margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the wholesale margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $76m of wholesale margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $181m of wholesale margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $2 819m of wholesale margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $2 928m of wholesale margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the household sector for final consumption and so on, resulting in a total of $3 466m of wholesale margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture to all the final use categories.


Table 24. Retail margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the retail margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $68m of retail margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $530m of retail margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $5 771m of retail margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the household sector for final consumption.


Table 25. Restaurants, hotels and clubs margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the restaurants, hotels and clubs margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $634m of restaurants, hotels and clubs margin is associated with the supply of Sugar and confectionary manufacturing to the household sector for final consumption and so on, resulting in a total of $3 649m of restaurants, hotels and clubs margin being associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to the household sector.


Table 26. Road transport margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the road transport margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $164m of road transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $82m of road transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $1 077m of road transport margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $1 316m of road transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the household sector for final consumption and so on, resulting in a total of $1 539m of road transport margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture to all the final use categories.


Table 27. Rail transport margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the rail transport margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $5m of rail transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $1m of rail transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the Poultry and other livestock industry and so on, resulting in a total of $28m rail transport margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $30m of rail transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to the household sector for final consumption and so on, resulting in a total of $37m of rail transport margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to all the final use categories.


Table 28. Pipeline transport margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the pipeline transport margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $72m of pipeline transport margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the Oil and gas extraction industry, $6m of pipeline transport margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the Coal mining industry and so on, resulting in a total of $1 692m of pipeline transport margin being associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $754m of pipeline transport margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the household sector for final consumption.


Table 29. Water transport margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the water transport margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $12m of water transport margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the Petroleum and coal product manufacturing industry, $4m of water transport margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the Wholesale trade industry and so on, resulting in a total of $15m of water transport margin being associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $10 m of water transport margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to exports (including re-exports) for final demand.


Table 30. Air transport margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the air transport margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $2m of air transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $1m of air transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $25m of air transport margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $24m of air transport margin is associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to the household sector for final consumption and so on, resulting in a total of $28m of air transport margin being associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to all the final use categories.


Table 31. Port handling margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the port handling margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $7m of port handling margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the Petroleum and coal product manufacturing industry, $2m of port handling margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the Wholesale Trade industry and so on, resulting in a total of $9m of port handling margin being associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $17m of port handling margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to exports (including re-exports) for final consumption.


Table 32. Marine insurance margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the marine insurance margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

A total of $1m of marine insurance margin was associated with the supply of Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle products to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $1m of marine insurance margin is associated with the supply of Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle products to exports (including re-exports).


Table 33. Gas margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the gas margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories. In this case the supplied products are entirely in the Oil and gas extraction product group.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $10m of gas margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the Coal mining industry, $105m of gas margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the Oil and gas extraction industry and so on, resulting in a total of $2 387m of gas margin being associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to all industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $1 196m of gas margin is associated with the supply of Oil and gas extraction products to the household sector for final consumption and $30m was associated with exports (including re-exports) resulting in a total of $1 226m of gas margin being associated with the supply to all final use categories.


Table 34. Electricity margin on supply by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the electricity margin associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories. In this case the supplied products are entirely in the product group Electricity generation.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $221m of electricity margin is associated with the supply of Electricity generation products to the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $171m of electricity margin is associated with the supply of Electricity generation products to the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $16,239m of electricity margin being associated with the supply of Electricity generation products to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $7,865m of electricity margin is associated with the supply of Electricity generation products to the household sector for final consumption and so on, resulting in a total of $8,076m of electricity margin being associated with the supply of Electricity generation products to all the final use categories.


Table 35. Net taxes on products by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the net taxes, that is taxes less subsidies, associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $3m of net taxes is associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to the Other agriculture industry, $8m of net taxes is associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to the Agriculture, forestry and fishing support services industry and so on, resulting in a total of $60m of net taxes being associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to all the industries for intermediate use.

A total of $344m of net taxes was associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to all the final use categories.


Table 36. Goods and services tax on products by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the Goods and Services Tax (GST) associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $69m of GST is associated with the supply of Professional, scientific and technical services to the Finance industry, $18m of GST is associated with the supply of Professional, scientific and technical services to the Ownership of Dwellings industry and so on, resulting in a total of $197m of GST being associated with the supply of Professional, scientific and technical services to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $517m of GST is associated with the supply of Professional, scientific and technical services to the household sector for final consumption and so on, resulting in a total of $579m of GST being associated with the supply of Professional, scientific and technical services to all the final use categories.


Table 37. Duty on products by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows the imports duty associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $1m of duty is associated with the supply of Other food product manufacturing to the Dairy product manufacturing industry, $1m of duty is associated with the supply of Other food product manufacturing to the Fruit and vegetable product manufacturing industry and so on, resulting in a total of $10m of duty being associated with the supply of Other food product manufacturing to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $9m of duty is associated with the supply of Other food product manufacturing products to the household sector for final consumption.


Table 38. Taxes on products nei by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows taxes (including excise taxes) not elsewhere identified (nei) associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $3m of taxes nei on products are associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the Other agriculture industry, $8m of taxes nei on products are associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the Agriculture, forestry and fishing support services industry and so on, resulting in a total of $57m of taxes nei on products being associated with the supply of Other agriculture to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $48m of taxes nei on products are associated with the supply of Other agriculture to the household sector for final consumption and a total of $49m of taxes nei on products being associated with the supply of Other agriculture products to all the final use categories.


Table 39. Subsidies on products by product group by using industry and final use category

This table shows subsidies associated with the supply of domestic and imported products to intermediate usage and final use categories. By convention subsidies are shown as negative values in the table.

A row in this table represents a product group and a column represents an industry group or final use category.

For example, $366m of subsidies are associated with the supply of Petroleum and coal product manufacturing to the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry, $268m of subsidies are associated with the supply of Petroleum and coal products to the Other agriculture industry and so on, resulting in a total of $5 378m of subsidies being associated with the supply of Petroleum and coal products to all the industries for intermediate use.

In the final use categories, $1 132m of subsidies are associated with the supply of Petroleum and coal products to the household sector for final consumption and so on, resulting in a total of $1 175m of subsidies being associated with the supply of Petroleum and coal products to all the final use categories.


Table 40. Industry and product concordances

IOIG(2015) to ANZSIC06

In the IOIG(2015) to ANZSIC06 table, IOIG(2015) codes are shown in column A and IOIG(2015) descriptors are shown in column B of the table. ANZSIC codes are shown in column C and ANZSIC descriptors are shown in column D. The ANZSIC codes shown in this table are ANZSIC Class codes.

For example, IOIG 0101, the Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle industry is mapped to ANZSIC codes 0141 (Sheep Farming (Specialised)), 0142 (Beef Cattle Farming (Specialised)), 0143 (Beef Cattle feedlots (specialised)), 0144 (Sheep-Beef Cattle Farming), 0145 (Grain-Sheep or Grain-Beef Farming), 0146 (Rice Growing), 0149 (Other Grain Growing) and 0160 (Dairy Cattle Farming).

IOIG(2005) to IOIG(2009)

In the IOIG(2005) to IOIG(2009) table, the 2005 IOIG codes are shown in column A with the 2005 IOIG descriptors in column B. The 2009 IOIG codes are in column C with the 2009 IOIG descriptors shown in column E. Column D indicates whether a 2005 IOIG is mapped partially to a 2009 IOIG and is indicated by a 'p' in the column.

For example, the 2005 IOIG 0102 (Grains) is mapped partially to the 2009 IOIG's 0101 (Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle) and 0103 (Other agriculture).

IOPC(2005) to IOPC(2009)

The IOPC(2005) to IOPC(2009) table shows the 2005 IOPC code in column A with the 2005 IOPC descriptor shown in column B. Column C shows the 2009 IOPC code with the 2009 IOPC descriptor in column E. Column E indicates whether a 2005 IOPC is mapped partially to a 2009 IOPC and is indicated by a 'p' in the column.

For example, the 2005 IOPC 01110010 (Plant nurseries (incl turf)) is mapped partially to the 2009 IOPCs 01110010 (Plants grown undercover), 01120010 (Plants grown outdoors) and 01130010 (Turf).

IOPC(2015) to IOPC(2017)

The IOPC(2015) to IOPC(2017) table shows the 2015 IOPC code in column A with the 2015 IOPC descriptor shown in column B. Column C shows the 2017 IOPC code with the 2017 IOPC descriptor in column D.

IOPC(2017) to IOPC(2018)

The IOPC(2017) to IOPC(2018) table shows the 2017 IOPC code in column A with the 2017 IOPC descriptor shown in column B. Column C shows the 2018 IOPC code with the 2018 IOPC descriptor in column D. Most of the changes between IOPC(2017) and IOPC(2018) are minor corrections to the IOPC descriptors to improve their coherence.

IOPC(2018) to CPI(17th series)

The IOPC(2018) to CPI(17th series) table shows the 2018 IOPC code in column A with the 2018 IOPC descriptor shown in column C. Column D shows the CPI 17th series code with the CPI 17th series descriptor in column F. Column G indicates whether a 2018 IOPC is mapped partially to a CPI 17th series code and is indicated by a 'p' in the column.

For example, the 2018 IOPC 01110010 (Plants grown undercover) is mapped uniquely to the CPI 17th series code 543 (Other non-durable household products).

IOPG(2015) to HEC(2015-16)

The IOPG(2015) to HEC(2015-16) table shows the 2015 IOPG code in column A with the 2015 IOPG descriptor shown in column C. Column D shows the partial split of corresponding 2015-16 HEC codes within a 2015 IOPG code. Where it shows a 'p', the 2015-16 HEC code is split between different 2015 IOPG codes. Column E shows the HEC(2015-16) code with the HEC(2015-16) descriptor in column G.

For example, 2015-16 HEC 1001060101 (Crash repairs) and 1001060201 (Vehicle servicing (including parts and labour)) are proportionally split within 2015 IOPG 9401 Automotive repair and maintenance. Where it shows a 'p' in Column D, the 2015-16 HEC code 0302030104 (Other lamb and mutton nec) is split between 2015 IOPG 0101 (Sheep, grains, beef and dairy cattle) and 2015 IOPG (1101 Meat and meat product manufacturing).

There are a number of factors to take into account when using this table. It should only be applied to data at Purchasers prices as it was based on the Household Expenditure Survey (HES) which is collected at Purchasers Prices. The table was compiled from the 2015-16 HES and may not align well to data in earlier years due to the changing nature of Household expenditure and the economic conditions prevailing at the time.

Where individual Household expenditure items do not correlate to one Input-Output product group, weights have been calculated using the best data available. Correspondences for some IOPGs have not been included due to confidentiality issues.

Data from the HES, classified by the HEC does not correlate directly to HFCE data as published in the National Accounts due to the following reasons:

  • The scope of the HES excludes residents of remote areas and those living in non-private dwellings (hotels, boarding houses and institutions);
  • HFCE data includes expenditure by Non-Profit Institutions Serving Households units that are not included in HES.
  • HFCE uses additional data sources including the Retail and Wholesale industry surveys.
  • HES data is not used to compile HFCE data for Gambling as it collects data on a different basis.
  • HES data is not used to compile Financial and insurance services as HES measures the total cost paid for insurance, and HFCE only captures the Insurance service charge.
  • HES data is not used to compile the Actual rent paid on dwellings, and HFCE also includes an imputed value for rent for owner- occupied dwellings.
  • HES estimates for Health include only out of pocket expenses, and do not include nursing home fees.
  • For Education services, HES excludes expenditure on the Higher education loan program.
  • HFCE estimates for Repairs and maintenance are included in the Intermediate Usage of the Ownership of Dwellings industry and could not be concorded to HES data.
  • HFCE estimates include an imputed value for the Financial Intermediation Services Indirectly Measured which is measured differently in HES.

IOPC(2018)

The IOPC(2018) table shows the 2018 IOPC code in column A with the 2018 IOPC descriptor shown in column C. Column D shows the corresponding IOPG(2015) code.

IOIG(2015)

The IOIG(2015) table shows the 2015 IOIG code in column A with the 2015 IOIG descriptor shown in column B. Column C shows the corresponding ANZSIC Division code.