4174.0 - Spectator Attendance at Sporting Events, 2009-10 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 21/12/2010  Final
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GLOSSARY

Age

This is the person's age on their last birthday at the time of the survey.

Attendance rate

For any group, this is calculated by expressing the number of people who attended a venue or event at least once during the year as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over in the same group.

Balance of state/territory

This category comprises people usually resident in areas outside of the six state capital city Statistical Divisions, including all residents of the Northern Territory (except those in very remote areas) and the Australian Capital Territory.

Capital cities

The areas determining the six state capital cities are the Statistical Divisions for those capital cities defined in Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) (cat. no. 1216.0). Darwin and Canberra are included in the 'Balance of state/territory' category.

Country of birth

Country of birth is classified according to the Standard Australia Classification of Counties (SACC) (cat. no.1269.0).

Couple

Two people in a registered or de facto marriage, who usually live in the same household.

Cycling

Includes BMXing and mountain biking.

Dependent children

These are all people aged under 15 years; and people aged 15-24 years who are full-time students, have a parent in the household and do not have a partner or child of their own in the household.

Employed

All persons aged 15 years and over who, during the reference week:

  • worked for one hour or more for pay, profit, commission or payment in kind in a job or business, or on a farm (comprising employees, employers and own account workers); or
  • worked for one hour or more without pay in a family business or on a farm (i.e. contributing family workers); or
  • were employees who had a job but were not at work and were:
      • away from work for less than four weeks up to the end of the reference week; or
      • away from work for more than four weeks up to the end of the reference week and received pay for some or all of the four week period to the end of the reference week; or
      • away from work as a standard work or shift arrangement; or
      • on strike or locked out; or
      • on workers' compensation and expected to return to their job; or
  • were employers or own account workers, who had a job, business or farm, but were not at work.

Employed full-time

Employed persons who usually worked 35 hours or more a week (in all jobs) and those who, although usually working less than 35 hours a week, worked 35 hours or more during the reference week.

Employed part-time

Employed persons who usually worked less than 35 hours a week (in all jobs) and either did so during the reference week, or were not at work in the reference week.

Equivalised Household Income

Equivalising adjusts actual income to take into account the different needs of the households of different sizes and compositions. There are economic advantages associated with living with others, because household resources, especially housing, can be shared.

The equivalence scale used to obtain equivalised income is that used in studies by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and is referred to as the 'modified OECD scale'. The scale gives a weight of 1.0 to the first adult in the household, a weight of 0.5 for each additional adult (persons aged 15 years and over) and a weight of 0.3 for every child, For each household, the weights of the household members are added together to form a household weight. Total household income then divided by the household weight to give an income that a lone person household would need for a similar standard of living

Equivalised household income can be viewed as am indicator of the economic resources available to each member of the household.

Family

This comprises two or more people, one of whom is at least 15 years of age, who are related by blood, marriage (registered or de facto), adoption, step or fostering, and who usually live in the same household. A separate family is formed for each married couple, or for each set of parent-child relationship where only one parent is present.

Household

A household is defined as a group of two or more related or unrelated people who usually reside in the same dwelling, who regard themselves as a household, and who make common provision for food or other essentials for living; or a person living in a dwelling who makes provision for his/her own food and other essentials for living, without combining with any other person.

Household composition

Descriptions of the different types of household composition are provided below:

Couple only. A household consisting of a couple with no other related or unrelated persons usually resident.

Couple with dependent children. A household consisting of a couple and at least one dependent child usually resident in the household. Related non-dependent children may also be present in the household. Households which also have other related or unrelated residents are included.

One parent with dependent children. A household consisting of a lone parent and at least one dependent child usually resident in the household. Non-dependent children may also be present in the household. Households which also have other related or unrelated usual residents are included.

Lone person. A household consisting of a person living alone.

Other. Comprises all other households, including multiple family households, group households and households consisting of unrelated adults, and other one family households.

Income quintiles

When originally ranking and deriving income quintiles, the same dollar values can appear in adjoining quintile. The quintile boundaries have been adjusted so that each quintile range are mutually exclusive. The impact of this is minor but it should be noted that the income quintiles only approximate 20% of the estimated population. Cases where the income was not stated, not known or refused are recorded as 'Income not known or not stated' and were excluded from the calculation of the quintiles. See also Quintiles.

Labour force status

A classification of the civilian population aged 15 years and over into employed, unemployed or not in the labour force, as defined. The definitions conform closely to the international standard definitions adopted by the International Conferences of Labour Statisticians.

Main English-speaking countries

The list of main English-speaking countries (MESC) provided here is not an attempt to classify countries on the basis of whether or not English is the predominant or official language of each country. It is a list of main countries from which Australia receives, or has received, significant numbers of overseas settlers who are likely to speak English. These countries comprise the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa and the United States of America. Non-MESC describes people originating from countries where a language other than English is likely to be spoken by migrants. It is important to note that being from a non main English-speaking country does not imply a lack of proficiency in English.

Motor sports

Includes car, motor cycle, speedway, drag and go-cart racing.

Non-dependent children

All persons aged 15 years or over (except those aged 15-24 years who are full-time students) who have a parent in the household and do not have a partner or child of their own in the household.

Not in labour force

Persons who were not in the categories employed or unemployed as defined.

Quintiles

Groupings that result from ranking all households or people in the population in ascending order to some characteristic such as their income and then dividing the population into five equal groups, each comprising around 20% of the estimated population. See also Income quintiles.

Sports attendances

The question on sports attendance asked the respondent which sports (matches or competitions) they had been to as a spectator, during the previous 12 months. The respondent's own definition of sport was accepted. A sport was included regardless of whether the event was paid for or free of charge, or if it was attended at an overseas venue; but it was excluded if it was school or junior sport. A limit of 5 sports could be listed. Due to under-reporting of some sports (not always regarded as sports), specific questions were asked about attendance at motor sports, harness racing, horse races and dog races.

Unemployed

Persons aged 15 years and over who were not employed during the reference week, and:
  • had actively looked for full-time or part-time work at any time in the four weeks up to the end of the reference week and were available for work in the reference week; or
  • were waiting to start a new job within four weeks from the end of the reference week and could have started in the reference week if the job had been available then.