Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
Newsletters - National Centre for Culture and Recreation Statistics (NCCRS) - January 2004
 
 

A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR
PARTICIPATION IN SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES
ATTENDANCE AT SPORTING EVENTS
CULTURAL ATTENDANCE
GENERAL SOCIAL SURVEY
SPORT AND RECREATION: A STATISTICAL OVERVIEW
HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURE ON SPORTS, PHYSICAL RECREATION AND OTHER LEISURE
EXERCISE AND OBESITY IN ADULTS
CULTURAL FUNDING BY GOVERNMENT CONTINUES TO RISE
LINK YOUR WEB SITE TO OURS!
NCCRS CONTACT POINTS

A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR

Happy New Year to you all! We are looking forward to another full work program in 2004.

In our last newsletter we gave you some advance notice that data would soon be released from our inaugural General Social Survey. As promised, several publications have now been released, including three publications devoted to important culture and sport statistics. Details of these are provided in this newsletter. In addition, we are very excited about the potential that this survey offers for further in depth analysis of cultural and sport attendance and sport participation.

This year also marks the completion of an extensive publication on Sport and Recreation, which contains a snapshot of statistics from just about every ABS data source that has anything to say about sport and recreation. This is an important general reference on sport and recreation statistics for planners and practitioners alike. It covers data on sport and physical recreation, amusements, gambling and hospitality. We are currently working on a similarly comprehensive publication for culture, which is due for release in the first half of 2004 (Cultural Trends, Australia).

There have been so many interesting releases of data in the last few months of 2003 that we can only give you a brief glimpse of each of them in this newsletter. The main features of these releases are freely available on the ABS web site.

Make sure you look out for the upcoming publication on Children's Participation in Culture and Leisure Activities (cat. no. 4901.0). This is due out in the next month and will provide results from the second survey of children's participation, allowing a time comparison over the period from April, 2000 to April, 2003. It will be interesting to see what activities are in decline or on the increase for children. This survey will provide some statistics to inform the debate about whether children are spending more time on computers playing games rather than organised sports or culture activities, as is so often hypothesised. We expect there will be a great deal of media interest in these data.

In the last couple of months I've had the opportunity to meet with some of you, as NCCRS is in the midst of presenting a series of seminars entitled 'The Art of Numbers - Culture Statistics in Australia'. A seminar is being held in each capital city of Australia, and they are being partly funded and organised by the arts departments in each state and territory. So far we've been to Perth, Melbourne and Hobart, and we will be visiting the other capital cities in the first few months of 2004. These sessions are providing us with a wonderful opportunity to let people know about the wide range of data that are available, and to encourage feedback about your highest priorty statistical and research needs. Information we obtain at the seminars or, indeed, from anyone who uses our statistics will feed into the information development plan we are preparing on Heritage and the Arts, which was discussed in our January 2003 newsletter. Outside this more structured consultation process, and our regular client meetings, we would welcome your feedback and ideas at any time, so feel free to contact us.

Lisa Conolly
Acting Director

PARTICIPATION IN SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

Nearly two-thirds of Australians aged 18 years and over (62.4% or 9.1 million people) participated in sport and physical activities at least once during the 12 months prior to interview in 2002. Of these, 5.6 million people participated, on average, at least weekly. This represents 38.6% of the adult population.

Participation rates for the states and territories were: NSW 59.5%, Vic 63.0%, Qld 61.2%, SA 57.7%, WA 74.9%, Tas 60.3%, NT 70.6% and ACT 76.1%.

More males (4.7 million or 65.0%) than females (4.4 million or 59.9%) participated in sport and physical activities at least once in the 12 months prior to interview in 2002. However, a similar number and proportion of males (2.8 million or 38.6%) and females (2.8 million or 38.7%) reported participating in these activities at least weekly.

Walking for exercise was the most popular physical activity, reported by over 3.6 million or over one quarter (25.3%) of the population aged 18 years and over. Aerobics/fitness and swimming, both with 1.6 million participants (10.9%), were the next most popular choices of sport and physical activities. Golf was also a popular activity with 1.1 million adults (7.5%) participating in this activity.

These and other main features of Participation in Sport and Physical Activities, Australia, 2002 are available free of charge on this web site.

ATTENDANCE AT SPORTING EVENTS

Overall, 48.2% of Australians aged 18 years and over attended at least one sporting event in 2002. The main sport attended was Australian rules football (17.1%). This was followed by horse racing (12.9%) and motor sports (10.2%). Attendances at the latter activities, however, may be an annual event, for example attendance at the Melbourne Cup, a motor racing Grand Prix or similar event, and the publication provides further details on frequency of attendance.

Attendances (excluding motor sports) had increased from 42.1% of the population in 1995 to 44.8% in 2002. The big winners in attendance from 1995 to 2002 were Australian rules football (13.1% up to 17.1%), outdoor soccer (3.8% to 5.5%) and rugby union (2.5% to 4.6%). Decreases in attendance were reported for cricket (8.0% to 6.0%) and basketball (4.3% down to 3.0%).

In general, sports attendance is a male-dominated activity with a third more males than females (four and three million respectively) attending events in 2002. Only tennis had similar rates of attendance by both males and females (2.7%), and the female attendance rate for netball was over twice that for males (2.1% and 0.9% respectively).

These and other main features of Sports Attendance, Australia, 2002 are available free of charge on this web site.

CULTURAL ATTENDANCE

In 2002, a total of 12.8 million people (88% of the Australian population aged 18 years and over) went to at least one cultural venue or event over a 12 month period. Popular cultural venues included cinemas (attended by 70% of the population), libraries (42%), botanic gardens (42%) and zoological parks and aquariums (40%). Attendance rates at other cultural venues and events during the 12 month period were 26% at popular music concerts, 25% at museums, 25% at art galleries, 19% at musicals and operas, 18% at theatre performances, 11% at dance performances and 9% at classical music concerts.

For most cultural venues and events:
  • females were more likely to attend than males
  • people born overseas in the main English speaking countries were more likely to attend than other people
  • people who were employed were more likely to attend than people who were unemployed or not in the labour force
  • people with higher educational qualifications (such as postgraduate degrees or graduate diplomas) were more likely to attend than other people
  • people living in households with relatively high incomes were more likely to attend than other people.

Libraries and cinemas were the most frequently attended venues - 40% of those who visited libraries in the 12 month period had gone there over 10 times during the year, while 23% of those who visited cinemas had been there over 10 times during the year.

These and other main features of Attendance at Selected Cultural Venues and Events, Australia, 2002 are available free of charge on this web site.

GENERAL SOCIAL SURVEY

The three surveys described above were conducted as supplements to the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS). The main findings from the core components of that survey were released on 18 December, 2003 in General Social Survey, Summary Results, Australia, 2002 (cat. no. 4159.0; $32.00). Thus, it is now possible to analyse the relationship between cultural and sport attendance and participation and a much wider range of socioeconomic characteristics than has been possible with previous surveys. Examples that may interest you include index of relative socio-economic disadvantage, self-assessed health status, personal and household income, financial stress, voluntary work, sources and provision of personal support, feelings of safety at home and perceived level of dificulty with transport. Staff in NCCRS are working with key clients to determine what analyses may be undertaken in our centre in the future.

A full list of data items from the 2002 GSS is contained in the 2002 General Social Survey:Data Reference Package which is freely available on the ABS web site. Versions of the 'summary results' tables compiled separately for each state and territory will be available on the ABS web site from January 2004 and a detailed user's guide will be available on the ABS web site from February 2004. For researchers wishing to undertake their own more detailed analysis of the survey data it is expected that microdata from the GSS will be released in the form of two confidentialised unit record files (CURFs), the basic CURF and the expanded CURF, the latter of which will only be available via the Remote Access Data Laboratory (RADL). Both of these options are expected to be available in February 2004. More information may be obtained from Jenny Harber on Canberra (02) 6252 5508.

SPORT AND RECREATION: A STATISTICAL OVERVIEW

Sport and Recreation: A Statistical Overview was released on 14 November. It contains information sourced from a variety of ABS collections covering a wide range of aspects of sport.

In addition to the sports attendance and participation features described above, highlights of the Overview include:
  • Organisations mainly involved in providing sports and physical recreation services generated $4.8 billion worth of income.
  • Government funding of sports and physical recreation was worth $2.1 billion, while business contributed $628 million in support and sponsorship.
  • Australian households spent an average of $11.03 per week on sports and physical recreation equipment and activities.
  • Retail sales of sports and physical recreation products totalled $3.8 billion.
  • Imports of sporting goods were valued at $1.2 billion and exports reached $463 million.
  • There were 83,008 people whose main job was in a sport- or physical recreation-related occupation and more than a million volunteers (1,140,700) acting in supporting roles.

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURE ON SPORTS, PHYSICAL RECREATION AND OTHER LEISURE

Household Expenditure on Sports, Physical Recreation and Other Leisure, Australia, 1998-99 is a report prepared for the Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport by the NCCRS and was released in August 2003. The report can be accessed from the Culture and Recreation theme page on the ABS web site by selecting Themes, then Culture and Recreation, followed by Expenditure (Sport and Recreation), and then Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport reports, or by clicking on the link above.

The report found that, during 1998-99, households in Australia spent $4,096.4m on selected sports and physical recreation products. A little under half of this expenditure ($1,968.3m) was for sports and physical recreation services, while $1,630.4m was spent on sports, physical recreation and camping equipment, and $493.9m on sports and recreation vehicles.

In addition to the expenditure on sports and physical recreation, there was $13,020.7m spent on selected other leisure products. Of this amount, 60% ($7,799.1m) was for 'food and beverage serving services' and gambling accounted for another $2,154.0m.

During 1998-99, Australian households spent, on average, $11.03 per week on sports and physical recreation, and $35.06 on other leisure. Weekly expenditure on sports and physical recreation was 1.6% of average weekly expenditure on all products. For other leisure, weekly expenditure was 5.0% of average weekly expenditure on all products.

EXERCISE AND OBESITY IN ADULTS

Our July newsletter made reference to a report prepared by NCCRS for the Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport about the increasing percentage of the Australian population who were physically active as reported in the National Health Survey (NHS). The ABS has now published more detailed analyses of physical activity, body mass and other health risk factors, including comparisons between the results of the 1989-90, 1995 and 2001 NHSs in Health Risk Factors, Australia, 2001.

The main features of this publication show that the increase in physical activity was mainly attributable to an increase in the number of people undertaking light exercise (such as walking). Low levels of light exercise increased from 33% of people aged 15 years and over in 1989-90 to 38% in 2001, while the percentage of the population exercising at moderate or high levels showed little change (remaining around 30% over the same period).

In the NHS, Body Mass Index (BMI) is calculated from self-reported height and weight information, using the formula weight (in kilograms) divided by the square of height (in metres). A person with a BMI in the range 25.0 to less than 30.0 is classified in the NHS as overweight and with a BMI of 30.0 or greater as obese. The last three NHSs show that body dimensions being reported by Australians have placed them increasingly in the overweight or obese categories. In 1989-90, 36% of people aged 15 years and over were overweight or obese. This increased to 39% in 1995 and 44% in 2001.

CULTURAL FUNDING BY GOVERNMENT CONTINUES TO RISE

Total government funding for cultural activities increased by $238.8m or 5% in 2001-02 to reach $4,676.8m. This latest financial year's data continued a trend that has been apparent for the last four years, especially in the lead up to the Centenary of Federation celebrations, where government expenditure on culture grew by almost $900m or 23% between 1998-99 and 2001-02. Cultural funding per person by all levels of government totalled $238.60 for every person in Australia in 2001-02.

The state and territory governments led the way in 2001-02 contributing 47% ($2,215.2m) of total government funding while the Commonwealth provided 35% ($1,619.6m) and local governments 18% ($841.9m). The majority of Commonwealth and state and territory government funding was allocated to Broadcasting and film ($988.9m), Nature parks and reserves ($977.4m), Other museums ($493.7m) and Libraries and archives ($466.7m).

With the winding down of Federation Fund projects, the Commonwealth Government's expenditure on culture fell 2% in 2001-02 while the state and territory governments' funding of culture rose by 16% when compared to the previous financial year. In particular, the Commonwealth Government cut spending on Other museums (down $79.5m to $227.4m), Community cultural activities (down $28.6m to $21.8m) and Other arts n.e.c. (down $17.1m to $44.5m) although spending increased in the areas of Libraries and archives (up $28.4m to $111.4m) and Broadcasting and film (up $52.6m to $914.0m).

The state and territory governments increased spending on Art museums (up $82.1m to $176.5m), Libraries and archives (up $39.7m to $355.3m), Performing arts venues (up $68.2m to $161.7m) and Broadcasting and film (up $31.1m to $74.9m).

These findings were published in Cultural Funding by Government, Australia, 2001-02 . A slightly more detailed report on this collection of data, Cultural Funding in Australia, Three Tiers of Government, 2001-02, has been prepared by NCCRS for the Cultural Ministers Council Statistics Working Group and is expected to become available on their web site at <http://www.dcita.gov.au/swg>.

LINK YOUR WEB SITE TO OURS!

Do you think that readers of your web site will find these statistics interesting? If so, we encourage you to add a link (or links) from your web site to the ABS web site. For some more information about linking to the ABS web site, or ideas on where to link to, visit the ABS Disclaimer page.

NCCRS CONTACT POINTS

Email: <nccrs@abs.gov.au>

Culture Topics: Chris Giddings on (08) 8237 7326

Sport Topics: Colin Speechley on (08) 8237 7363

Director: Lisa Conolly on (08) 8237 7402

Fax: (08) 8237 7366

Address:
National Centre for Culture and Recreation Statistics
Australian Bureau of Statistics
GPO Box 2272
ADELAIDE, SA, 5001

ABS Internet site: <http://www.abs.gov.au>



Commonwealth of Australia 2008

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.