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Newsletters - National Children and Youth Statistics - Issue 7, August 2006
 
 

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WELCOME

Welcome to the seventh edition of Children & Youth News, the newsletter of the ABS’ National Children and Youth Statistics Unit. Children & Youth News is designed to highlight developments in children and youth related statistics and provides links to recent data releases relevant to the field.


UPDATE ON THE INFORMATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Work on an Information Development Plan for the children and youth field is nearing completion-refer to Issue 2 of Children and Youth News for a description of the Plan. A draft Plan, Improving Statistics on Children and Youth: An Information Development Plan, was available for stakeholder comment in early 2006. Feedback was sought on this draft during extensive consultation with state and territory government departments, non-government organisations and multi-jurisdictional bodies. This feedback was used to confirm and refine the data sources, data development needs and data development actions previously identified through consultation with federal government departments and national research organisations. A workshop with key stakeholders was also held in March of this year to identify the priority areas for data development action.

The Information Development Plan is expected to be available by the end of 2006. For more information on the Plan contact Lesley Martin on lesley.martin@abs.gov.au or (08) 9360 5320.


UPDATE ON THE NATIONAL DATA NETWORK

The National Data Network (NDN) will provide a distributed library of data holdings relevant to policy analysis and research. The NDN is in a "demonstration" phase, and will remain so throughout 2006. During this phase the range of statistical information and services available via the NDN, from any particular source organisation, will generally be limited. Since the NDN update in Issue 6 of Children & Youth News nodes have been created by Cystic Fibrosis Australia and the Telethon Institute of Child Health Research. The themes of these nodes are families and children.

For more information visit the NDN website.


LATEST FINDINGS


NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY, 2004-05

Drinking Behaviours of Youth Aged 18-24 Years

Recent data from the 2004-05 National Health Survey shows that 61% of youth aged 18-24 years consumed alcohol in the week prior to the interview. Males were more likely to consume alcohol than females, 65% compared with 56% respectively. The most popular alcoholic drinks for males were full strength beer (42%) followed by spirits/liqueurs (37%), wine (8%) and mid strength beer (5%), whereas the most popular for females were spirits/liqueurs (37%) followed by wine (19%), full strength beer (11%) and champagne/sparkling wine (6%).

The National Health Survey 2004-05 also collected data on alcohol risk levels and binge drinking which are independent measures of drinking behaviours.

Risk levels are based on those developed by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). High risk is defined as more than 75mls of pure alcohol per day for males, and more than 50mls per day for females. Risky is defined as more than 50-75mls per day for males, and more than 25-50mls per day for females. Results from the survey show that 14% (or 265,000) of young people aged 18-24 years consumed alcohol at risky or high risk levels in the week prior to interview. More youth were consuming at risky/high risk levels in 2004-05 than in previous surveys-11% in 2001 and 9% in 1995. Males were more likely to consume alcohol at risky or high risk levels than females, 15% compared with 13% respectively.


PERCENTAGE OF YOUTH AGED 18-24 YEARS
CONSUMING ALCOHOL AT RISKY OR HIGH RISK
LEVELS
graph: Percentage of Youth Aged 18-24 Years Consuming Alcohol at Risk or High Risk Levels


Data on binge drinking was collected in the National Health Survey 2004-05 for the first time. Respondents were asked how often in the last 12 months they had consumed five or more standard drinks (for females) or seven or more standard drinks (for males) in a day. Males aged 18-24 years were more likely to report binge drinking in the previous year than females of the same age, 68% compared with 58% respectively. Males were more likely to report binge drinking at least once per week than females, 19% compared to 11% respectively.

For further information and analyses of the National Health Survey 2004-05 see National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05 (cat. no. 4364.0).


AUSTRALIAN SOCIAL TRENDS

The Australian Social Trends, 2006 publication includes a number of articles relevant to children and youth.

Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples
Children Living Apart from One Parent
Social Participation of Young People
Education of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Young People
Boys’ Schooling
Housing for Young Adult Households


RECENT RELEASES


JULY

Aspects of Social Capital, Australia (cat. no. 4911.0)


JUNE

Population by age and sex, Australia, 2005 (cat. no. 3235.0.55.001)


MAY

Child Care, Australia (cat. no. 4402.0)


APRIL

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey, 2004-05 (cat. no. 4715.0)
Crime and Safety, Australia, Apr 2005 (cat. no. 4509.0)
Household Wealth and Wealth Distribution, Australia, 2003-04 (cat. no. 6554.0)


MARCH

Causes of Death, Australia, 2004 (cat. no. 3303.0)
Suicides, Australia, 1994 to 2004 (cat. no. 3309.0)


FEBRUARY

National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05 (cat. no. 4364.0)
Demography, Australia, 2004 Final (cat. no. 3311.0.55.001)


UPCOMING RELEASES


AUGUST

Personal Safety Survey, Australia (cat. no. 4906.0)
The Personal Safety Survey (PSS) will expand on the 1996 Women's Safety Survey and will include men for the first time. The survey measures the nature and extent of violence against men and women and the effects of this violence. It also provides information on experience of physical and sexual abuse as a child and since the age of 15, harassment and on people's feelings of safety within the home and in the community.

Labour Mobility, Australia (cat. no. 6209.0)
Provides information about people aged 15 years and over who had worked at some time during the year ending February. Details of changes in jobs between employers/businesses for up to three jobs, and for those people, who have been with their employer/business for the last 12 months, the changes in their job including promotion, transfer, changes in duties or change in full-time/part-time status.


NOVEMBER

Births, Australia (cat. no. 3301.0)
Provides detailed statistics on confinements and live births - male and female births, births of Indigenous children, age and birthplace of parents, duration of marriage, previous issue of the current relationship, nuptial and exnuptial births, single and multiple births, usual residence of mother (by state or territory) and regional comparisons.


NON-ABS RESEARCH


JUVENILE JUSTICE NATIONAL MINIMUM DATA SET

The report, Juvenile Justice in Australia 2000-01 to 2003-04, is based on the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set (NMDS), a joint project between the Australasian Juvenile Justice Administrators (AJJA) and the AIHW, and is designed to provide nationally comparable information on the juvenile justice system. It examines periods of time young people across Australia spent in detention and under community-based supervision and how those periods were managed.

To view the full report, visit the AIHW website


GROWING UP IN AUSTRALIA: THE LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN CHILDREN

Growing Up in Australia: the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) aims to examine the impact of Australia’s unique social and cultural environment on the next generation and will further the understanding of early childhood development and inform social policy debate. The study commenced in 2004 with two cohorts of children-the first cohort aged 0-1 years and the second 4-5 years. Follow-up data collection from both cohorts will occur every two years until 2010.

The second wave of interviews for Growing Up in Australia is now underway, with the study returning to hear from children and families about the children's development and progress since the last interview.

Further information on the Growing Up in Australia study can be found at http://www.aifs.gov.au/growingup/ or email growingup@aifs.gov.au


CHILDREN AND YOUTH THEME PAGE

A Children and Youth Statistics Theme page on the ABS website highlights the type and range of data available for analysis of children and youth issues. This page is updated to advise users of new data releases as they become available.


CONTACT US

For information about the full range of ABS data:
National Information and Referral Service
telephone: 1300 135 070
email: client.services@abs.gov.au
fax: 1300 135 211

For further information on the NCYSU and its activities:
Lesley Martin
telephone: (08) 9360 5320
email: lesley.martin@abs.gov.au



Commonwealth of Australia 2008

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