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Newsletters - National Centre for Culture and Recreation Statistics (NCCRS) - October Quarter 2001
 
 

A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR
DID THE OLYMPICS INCREASE PARTICIPATION LEVELS?
THE ‘AUSTRALIAN CULTURE AND LEISURE CLASSIFICATIONS’ ARE AVAILABLE
THE ‘MEASURING WELLBEING’ REPORT HAS BEEN RELEASED
A SUMMARY OF SPORT AND RECREATION IN AUSTRALIA
A SNAPSHOT OF AUSTRALIAN CULTURAL INDUSTRIES
BOOK PUBLISHING IN AUSTRALIA
FEDERATION FUND PROVIDES BIG BOOST TO ARTS FUNDING
INTERNET SUBSCRIBERS UP
NEW ASSISTANT DIRECTOR FOR NCCRS
NCCRS CONTACT POINTS


A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR

In September, NCCRS celebrated its 10th birthday as a centre of expertise in culture, sport and leisure statistics. NCCRS has grown from 2.5 staff at the outset to its current contingent of 14 staff. Over the decade, NCCRS staff have played a role in the release of countless ABS and non-ABS publications and have worked with a large number of clients. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all those who have supported the work of NCCRS over the years, as well as to acknowledge the efforts of current and past NCCRS staff who have made the achievements over the past decade possible.

It is timely that in this edition of the newsletter, we are able to announce one of the most significant of NCCRS’ achievements to date - the release of three classifications which cover culture and leisure industries, products and occupations. Invaluable advice and financial support for the production of these classifications were provided by the statistical working groups of the Cultural Ministers Council and of the Sport and Recreation Ministers’ Council. In addition, the assistance provided by many other organisations and individuals during the consultation phase of the project is gratefully acknowledged.

In the July edition of our newsletter, we provided information on the results from a number of the Cultural Industries surveys that the ABS undertook in respect of 1999-2000. In this edition, we complete the series by providing information on the following industries: Commercial art galleries, the Performing arts, Film and video production and distribution, and Television services.

In the remainder of this newsletter, a number of other reports and activities are described, including analyses we are currently undertaking on whether the hosting of the Olympics served to increase or decrease physical activity levels of Australians.

In December, NCCRS expects to release the following two publications: Involvement in Organised Sport and Physical Activity, April 2001 (ABS Cat. no. 6285.0) and Work in Selected Culture and Leisure Activities, April 2001 (ABS Cat. no. 6281.0). Key results will be highlighted in the January edition of this newsletter.

Adriana Vanden Heuvel


DID THE OLYMPICS INCREASE PARTICIPATION LEVELS?

No-one would dispute that the Sydney 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games were important sporting events in Australia’s history. We have heard about the success of these games in terms of our medal tallies, the stimulation of the economy and increased tourism. But did the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games have an impact on the level of participation in sport and physical activity of the general Australian population? It has long been suggested that such a ‘trickle down’ effect occurs, whereby people are inspired to become more active due to the successes of Olympic athletes and the staging of such high profile events. However, a counter hypothesis has also been suggested; that is, some have argued that the sporting excellence on display at major sporting events may actually discourage the average person from participating in physical activity due to the perceived gap between their level of ability and that of the elite athlete.

To date, little empirical evidence exists to support either hypothesis. For this reason, the NCCRS is currently investigating this issue using quarterly sport and physical activity participation data that has been collected by the ABS from August 1997 to November 2000. It is expected that the paper will be available in December. For further information, please contact Lisa Conolly by email: lisa.conolly@abs.gov.au


THE ‘AUSTRALIAN CULTURE AND LEISURE CLASSIFICATIONS’ ARE AVAILABLE

Currently a range of data on culture and leisure exists in Australia with these data sourced from a variety of ABS and non-ABS surveys and administrative compilations. Ideally, data from all of these sources would be comparable or complementary. However, this is often not the case as the underlying definitions and concepts used differ between sources. One way of improving coordination and comparability between data collections is to encourage the use of a common set of classifications. With respect to culture and leisure, the Australian Culture and Leisure Classifications (ACLC), which were released by the ABS in August, represent the first step in accomplishing this.

The ACLC consist of three parts: the Industry Classification, the Product Classification and the Occupation Classification. The Industry Classification lists industries consisting of organisations for which the main activity is the production or provision of culture and leisure goods and services. The Product Classification consists of a list of culture and leisure goods and services (together known as products). These products are the primary outputs of the industries listed in the Industry Classification; in addition, they are produced by other industries (for example, museum services may be provided by a business in the mining industry). The Occupation Classification, which is based on the Australian Standard Classification of Occupations (ASCO), lists occupations which are predominantly ‘culture or leisure’ in nature.

These classifications are expected to be adopted widely by users of culture and leisure data in Australia, including those organisations outside of the ABS which need to design a survey, organise administrative data or otherwise collect or collate information. The ABS has already begun to make use of the ACLC; for example, the ABS has incorporated most of the ACLC Product Classification in the new Australian and New Zealand Standard Product Classification (ANZSPC). Furthermore, output from the surveys on sport and recreation industries, currently being undertaken by the ABS, will be aligned with the ACLC Industry Classification.

The Australian Culture and Leisure Classifications (Cat. no. 4902.0) are available from ABS bookshops for $42.00. The ACLC may also be found free of charge in the Statistical Concepts Library on this site. Comments on the classifications and queries about their use or interpretation may be emailed to nccrs@abs.gov.au. Any comments on potential future developments, such as the need for additional classifications, are also welcome.


THE ‘MEASURING WELLBEING’ REPORT HAS BEEN RELEASED

A comprehensive explanation of the way social statistics are organised by the ABS was released recently to assist informed analysis of social issues. The publication, Measuring Wellbeing: Frameworks for Australian Social Statistics, covers nine areas of concern: population, family and community, health, education and training, work, economic resources, housing, crime and justice, and culture and leisure.

The ‘Culture and Leisure’ chapter of this publication was prepared by ABS staff in Canberra with the assistance of NCCRS staff. It incorporates: proposed definitions of culture and leisure; commentary on the connections between culture and leisure and the difficulties that exist with definitional boundaries; discussion of the importance of culture and leisure to individual and societal wellbeing; and commentary on key social issues related to culture and leisure. A framework of culture and leisure participation is presented and described; it could be viewed as a simplified component of the broader information model being developed by NCCRS. Details of the activity classification used in the ABS Time Use collections, the Australian Culture and Leisure Classifications and key measures used within the culture and leisure area are also provided. Finally, information is provided on a number of ABS and non-ABS culture and leisure data sources.

Measuring Wellbeing: Frameworks for Australian Social Statistics (Cat. no. 4160.0) is a 300-page volume available from ABS bookshops for $56.00, and is available on-line as an acrobat file free of charge in this site. It is expected to be made available in the Statistical Concepts Library on the web site within a few weeks.


A SUMMARY OF SPORT AND RECREATION IN AUSTRALIA

The NCCRS has produced a brochure entitled Sport and Recreation in Australia on behalf of the Sport and Recreation Ministers’ Council (SRMC). The brochure contains selected data extracted mainly from recent surveys undertaken by the ABS. The topics - all of which deal with sport and/or recreation - include: participation by adults and children; attendance; time spent on sport and recreation; household expenditure; economics of the sector; exports and imports; government funding; employment; and volunteers, including 2000 Olympic Games volunteers.

If you would like a free copy of this brochure, please email your request to nccrs@abs.gov.au.


A SNAPSHOT OF AUSTRALIAN CULTURAL INDUSTRIES


COMMERCIAL ART GALLERIES GENERATE $218 MILLION IN SALES OF ARTWORKS

At the end of June 2000, there were 514 commercial art gallery businesses operating in Australia, including 31 which identified the main activity of their business as being an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art centre. There were over 1,400 people employed by these businesses. In 1999-2000, the commercial art gallery businesses had total sales of artworks of $218 million. The sale of artworks by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists was $36 million (17% of total sales), while the sale of artworks by other Australian artists was $168 million (77% of total sales). The remaining $14 million was for sales of artworks by overseas artists.

The total income of commercial art gallery businesses in 1999-2000 was $132 million. Income from the sale of artworks owned by the commercial art gallery businesses accounted for $73 million or 55% of the total income. Commission income from the sale of artworks on behalf of others was $43 million (an increase of 69% since June 1997). Other sources of income included the sale of craftworks ($3 million), framing where it was separately invoiced ($1 million), and Government funding ($5 million). Most of the Government funding (61%) was received by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art centres.

Main features of Commercial Art Galleries, 1999-2000 are available free of charge on this site.


FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION INDUSTRIES EMPLOY OVER 15,000

At the end of June 2000, there were 1,975 businesses in the film and video production industry, employing a total of 15,195 people (an increase of 58% since June 1997). The total income of businesses in the film and video production industry during 1999-2000 was $1,474 million - the main source being from the production of television programs ($472 million), representing 32% of industry income.

At the end of June 2000, there were 58 businesses operating in the film and video distribution industry, employing a total of 1,426 people. The total income of businesses in the film and video distribution industry during 1999-2000 was $1,142 million, with income from the rental or lease of pre-recorded video tapes, DVDs, films and video games contributing $581 million (an increase of 34% since June 1997). A further $260 million was obtained from the sales of pre-recorded video tapes, DVDs and films.

Main features of Film and Video Production and Distribution, 1999-2000 are available free of charge on this site.


PERFORMING ARTS GENERATE $1,634 MILLION IN INCOME

At the end of June 2000, there were 1,437 employing organisations in the performing arts industries, employing a total of 16,429 people. A further 20,752 people worked as volunteers. There were 705 organisations in the music and theatre production industry and 125 organisations in the performing arts venue industry.

The total income of organisations in the performing art industries in Australia during 1999-2000 was $1,634 million, with music and theatre production organisations generating $505 million, followed by performing arts venues businesses ($316 million). Other services to the arts businesses generated $710 million. The main income sources were box office takings ($461 million) and Government funding ($470 million).

Main features of Performing Arts Industries, 1999-2000 are available free of charge on this site.


PRIVATE SECTOR BROADCASTERS GENERATE INCOME OF $4,182 MILLION

At the end of June 2000, there were two public television broadcasters and 41 private sector television broadcasters consisting of 34 commercial free-to-air businesses and 7 pay television services. There were 7,807 people employed by commercial free-to-air broadcasters and 2,861 employed by pay television broadcasters, which represented increases of 16% and 37% respectively since June 1997.

During 1999-2000, the private sector broadcasters had a total income of $4,182 million, an increase of 38% since 1996-97. The total income comprised $3,271 million from commercial free-to-air broadcasters and $911 million from pay television broadcasters. The three main networks accounted for 98% of the income of the commercial free-to-air broadcasters. The main income of commercial free-to-air broadcasters was from the sale of airtime ($2,821 million), while the main income of pay television broadcasters was subscription and membership fees ($789 million).

Main features of Television Services, 1999-2000 are available free of charge on this site.


BOOK PUBLISHING IN AUSTRALIA

The 1999-2000 Book Publishers Survey was the first of five annual surveys of book publishers to be conducted as part of the Commonwealth Government’s Book Industry Assistance Plan. The results of the survey suggest that for 1999-2000, there were 199 businesses which had book publishing as their main activity while a further 8 businesses, which were mainly involved in other activities, made a major contribution to book publishing activity in Australia. There were 4,747 people employed by these 207 book publishing businesses.

The survey found that 126 million books with a value of $1,200 million were sold during 1999-2000 by these businesses. Of the $1,200 million in book sales, 50% was for new titles published during 1999-2000. Imported books made up 39% of the value of book sales. Of the 199 book publishers, the 20 with the largest income accounted for 73% of the books sold by the book publishers and 71% of their value.

These results were released on 9 August in Book Publishers, Australia, 1999-2000 (ABS Cat. no. 1363.0; $21.00).

The Book Industry Assistance Plan also includes funding for four annual surveys of book retailers. The first of these, the 2000-01 Book Retailers Survey, is currently being conducted and it is expected that results will be available by mid 2002. The results of the second annual Book Publishers Survey will also be available at that time.


FEDERATION FUND PROVIDES BIG BOOST TO ARTS FUNDING

During 1999-2000, government funding of arts and cultural activities amounted to $3,977.7 million. Compared with 1998-99, funding rose for all levels of government. Commonwealth funding increased by 12.4% since 1998-99 due in part to a significant injection from the Federation Fund. State and Territory Governments reported a modest increase of 0.3% since the previous year while local government funding rose by 8.5% after falling in the previous two years.

These results were released on 26 July in Cultural Funding, Australia, 1999-2000 (ABS Cat. no. 4183.0) ($17.00). The publication provides estimates of public funding of arts and cultural activities for the three levels of government in Australia. A more comprehensive report, Cultural Funding in Australia - Three Tiers of Government 1999-2000, a Cultural Ministers Council Statistics Working Group (CMC SWG) publication, is due for release in November.


INTERNET SUBSCRIBERS UP

While there has been a fall in the number of Internet Service Providers (ISPs) since the March quarter 2001, the number of registered Internet subscribers has continued to increase. At the end of the June quarter 2001 there were 628 ISPs (a decrease of 6.0%) supplying Internet access services to 4.2 million (an increase of 5.4%) active Internet subscribers across Australia. Of the 628 ISPs, 5 very large ISPs provided Internet access to 57% (2.4 million) of all Internet subscribers. Of the 4.2 million Internet subscribers in Australia, 3.7 million were household subscribers and 508,000 were business and government subscribers.

Main features of Internet Activity Australia, June Quarter 2001 are available free of charge on this site.


NEW ASSISTANT DIRECTOR FOR NCCRS

Lisa Conolly joined our team in August 2001 to head up our Sport and Recreation Unit. Lisa has an Honours Degree in Psychology, and began her career in research roles at Macquarie University in Sydney, and later in state government in NSW. Lisa moved to Adelaide in 1990 and since then she has worked mostly in local government. Throughout her career, Lisa has gained a lot of experience as a ‘client’ of the ABS, using a wide range of ABS data; she also has solid experience in undertaking survey research and analysis activities. Lisa is a keen touring cyclist who once pushed the pedals 2000km from Sydney to Adelaide. Lisa is enjoying her new focus on sport and recreation statistics.


NCCRS CONTACT POINTS
Email: nccrs@abs.gov.au

Culture Topics: Chris Giddings on (08) 8237 7326

Sport Topics: Nigel Williams on (08) 8237 7427

Director: Adriana Vanden Heuvel on (08) 8237 7399

Fax: (08) 8237 7366

Address:
National Centre for Culture and Recreation Statistics
Australian Bureau of Statistics
GPO Box 2272
ADELAIDE, SA, 5001

ABS Internet site: http://www.abs.gov.au



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