Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
Newsletters - Demography News - September 1999
 
 


In this issue

1 Australia's population reaches 19 million
2 Population growth hanging in the balance
3 Interstate migration in 1998
4 Marriages and divorces
5 Households
6 Understanding Demographic Data
7 Population projections for Statistical Local Areas
8 Tourism
9 Demography data on the ABS web site
10 Do you need data in a spreadsheet immediately after a publication has been released?
11 ABS Demography working papers on ABS's web site
12 University access to ABS data
13 Demography conferences
14 What the ABS Demography Program produces
15 Key contacts



1 Australia's population reaches 19 million

In August 1999 Australia's population was projected to reach 19 million. For the very latest population figure on Australia's population, see the Australian Population Clock.

The increase in population from 18 to 19 million has taken four years and five months. During that time, natural increase contributed just over half of population growth and net overseas migration the balance.

ABS population projections suggest that it will take six years to add the next million people to Australia's population and that growth will continue to slow down as natural increase falls and migration levels remain steady. The population could be between 24 and 26 million by 2051.

Back to top of page

2 Population growth hanging in the balance

Population changes in two ways - from natural increase (births minus deaths) and from net overseas migration (the difference between permanent and long-term arrivals and departures with an adjustment for category jumping).

Over the last twenty years both natural increase and net overseas migration have made a positive contribution to population growth. However, net overseas migration has fluctuated more widely in response to changing economic conditions at home and abroad and variations in the size of the annual Migration Program set by the Government. With an ageing population, an increase in deaths is projected to reduce natural increase to zero sometime in the 2030s.

Further information on population growth is available in the article Population Growth - Hanging in the Balance published in Australian Demographic Statistics, December Quarter 1998 (Catalogue no. 3101.0, $19.50).

Back to top of page

3 Interstate migration in 1998

For the first time during the 1990s, Victoria had a net interstate migration gain of 2,800 in 1998. This was a major turnaround on the peak loss of 28,700 in 1993. Queensland and Western Australia were the only other States to experience net interstate migration gains in 1998 of 16,000 and 3,900 respectively. However, Queensland's gain was the smallest this decade, after a peak of 48,800 in 1993.

South Australia's net loss of 2,700 was the smallest since 1992. In the first two years of the decade, South Australia experienced small gains from net interstate migration. In contrast, Tasmania's net loss of 4,100 was the largest this decade. Like South Australia, it had small net gains in the early 1990s. After consistent net gains between 1990 and 1993, the Australian Capital Territory continued a period of net population losses, amounting to 2,000 in 1998. The Northern Territory also lost a net 700 people through interstate migration, after three years of net gains.

For further information see Australian Demographic Statistics, December Quarter 1999 (Catalogue no. 3101.0, $19.50). For details on how ABS estimates interstate migration, see Demography working paper 99/2 - Estimating Interstate Migration, 1996 - 2001.

Back to top of page

4 Marriages and divorces

There was a slight upward movement in the marriage rate in Australia in 1998. At the same time the divorce rate declined for the second year in succession. The marriage rate trend has been in a long-term decline and the divorce rate in a long-term upward trend. However it is too early to say whether the 1998 changes will continue. For further information see Marriages and Divorces, Australia, 1998 (Catalogue No. 3310.0, $27). (Click here to see main features from the publication.)

Back to top of page

5 Households

At June 1998, there were an estimated 7.1 million households in Australia. Over the past 22 years, while the number of households has continued to increase, the average size of households has fallen significantly from 3.1 persons in 1976 to 2.6 persons in 1998. Moreover, all States and Territories have experienced a decline in household size.

Reasons for this fall include the increase in the number of one person households, due largely to the ageing of the population, changes in the living arrangements of people and couples having smaller families.

Further information on household size is available in the article Average Household Size published in Australian Demographic Statistics, December Quarter 1998 (Catalogue no. 3101.0, $19.50).

Information about households, families and living arrangements of the projected population will be available when ABS releases a new publication Household and Family Projections, 1996-2021 (Catalogue no. 3236.0) scheduled for release in late October 1999. An overview of the proposed method for producing household and family projections has been released as a Demography Working Paper 99/1, Projections of households, families and living arrangements.

Back to top of page

6 Understanding Demographic Data

Understanding Demographic Data is a one day course which describes the demographic data framework and the processes which shape the population. It covers such topics as population projections, estimating population for small areas and wider uses of demographic data. It includes practical exercises in the analysis of demographic data.

Courses have already been run this year in Sydney, Brisbane, Darwin and Canberra. The next courses are planned for Melbourne on 15 and 16 September and Hobart on 19 October at a cost of $300 per participant. For information about the Melbourne courses contact Christine Holland on (03) 9615 7982, email christine.holland@abs.gov.au For information about the Hobart course contact Christina Campbell on (03) 6222 5854, email christina.campbell@abs.gov.au

Back to top of page

7 Population projections for Statistical Local Areas

To complement published population projections for capital cities/ balances of States in Population Projections, 1997-2051 (Catalogue no. 3222.0) (see Media Release), population projections for Australia's 1,300 Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) can be undertaken for clients by ABS. Under standard arrangements, the projections are to 2017 and have as a base the estimated resident population in each SLA at June 1997. While ABS takes responsibility for the method employed, the assumptions used are the responsibility of the client and the projections are not official ABS population statistics.

The SLA projections are available at a cost from $250 depending on the number of SLAs and age-sex detail required. Projections for New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and ACT can now be produced. Projections for Northern Territory can be undertaken from October; Western Australia in November and Victoria and Queensland in December 1999. For more information contact Jim Elliott on (02) 6252 5580, email jim.elliott@abs.gov.au

Back to top of page

8 Tourism

The quarterly publication Tourism Indicators, Australia (Catalogue no. 8634.0) contains data from the Survey of Tourist Accommodation (STA) and Overseas Arrivals and Departures (OAD) collections. From the STA collection, seasonal and trend data and takings data at constant prices as well as operating ratios are presented. From the OAD collection, market-segmentation data are included. Analytical articles relating to both collections are also included along with regular articles relating to other ABS tourism-related collections and a section of brief articles relating to statistics and developments in the tourism field. For more information visit the tourism theme page on the ABS web site or contact Dianne Bourke on (02) 6252 6348, email dianne.bourke@abs.gov.au

The monthly publication Overseas Arrivals and Departures, Australia (Catalogue no. 3401.0) contains the latest information on persons arriving in, and departing from, Australia. This includes data on the number and characteristics of travellers as well as feature articles. For more information contact Amanda Dobson on (02) 6252 5640, email amanda.dobson@abs.gov.au

Interested in the environmental impact of tourism? The July 1999 issue of Overseas Arrivals and Departures, Australia contains an article on Australia's stock of people. Account is taken of overseas visitors temporarily in Australia and Australian residents temporarily overseas in coming up with stock of people estimates.

Back to top of page

9 Demography data on the ABS web site

ABS's web site now incorporates themes to facilitate access to data. For Demography data, see http://www.abs.gov.au and access Themes/Demography. Two new additions to Demography data on the ABS web site are LGA population estimates and the Australian Population Clock. Suggestions for enhancements are welcome - please send to john.paice@abs.gov.au

Back to top of page

10 Do you need data in a spreadsheet immediately after a publication has been released?

We often get requests for data which are not included in our publications or for which special analysis is required. We can send the data you require by email as a spreadsheet when the relevant publication is released enabling you to view and analyse the information virtually straight away.

If you would like more information or a quote, please contact Amanda Dobson on (02) 6252 5640, email amanda.dobson@abs.gov.au

Back to top of page

11 ABS Demography working papers on ABS's web site



Back to top of page

12 University access to ABS data

To support academic research and teaching in Australian universities the ABS has entered into an agreement with the Australian Vice Chancellors Committee to make available Confidentialised Unit Record Files. For more information see ABS/AVCC CURF Agreement.

For research which accords with ABS priorities, ABS is prepared to consider awarding research fellowships. To discuss possible research fellowships involving Demography data, please contact John Paice on 02 6252 6411 or john.paice@abs.gov.au

Back to top of page

13 Demography conferences

    14-15 October 1999
    The Transformation of Australia’s Population 1970-2030

    29 November-1 December 1999:
    International Migration into the 21st Century
      Conducted by the Centre for Migration and Development Studies, University of Western Australia in Perth. More information from asiddqu@ecel.uwa.edu.au

    30 November-2 December 1999
    Geodemographics of Ageing in Australia Symposium
      The Australian Population Association and the Royal Geographical Society are jointly hosting a national symposium in Brisbane. ABS is a sponsor.

          The symposium will emphasise the geography of the ageing, moving from the international scale through the national scale to the urban and rural scale. A number of national and international experts will be speaking at the symposium, including Charles Longino, the author of many papers and books on the migration of the ageing in North America, and Gary Andrews, presently the Head, International Year of Older Persons at the United Nations in New York. Further information can be obtained from the Royal Geographical Society of Queensland (RGSQ) by phone on (07) 3252 3856 or at their web site http://www.rgsq.gil.com.au/

Back to top of page

14 What the ABS Demography Program produces

The demography program produces estimates of the total population by age, sex, birthplace, marital status and geographical distribution, estimates of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population and estimates of households and the household population. Regular statistics are also produced on births, deaths, marriages, divorces, overseas arrivals and departures, and internal migration. Projections of the population according to specified demographic assumptions are published on a regular basis and produced for individual clients. Benchmarks are provided for ABS and other population surveys. In addition to reporting on these statistics, courses on understanding demographic data are conducted and an email newsletter is sent to major clients.

Back to top of page

15 Key contacts

If you are seeking demographic or other ABS data, as well as what is available on this web site, you can contact the ABS by email - client.services@abs.gov.au, telephone or visit us in each capital city.

To subscribe to publications on a regular basis, please call 1300 366 323.

To order particular ABS publication(s), please call (02) 6252 5249.

If you wish to discuss demographic issues, please contact the following people.

      Fertility
    (02) 6252 6557
      Mortality
    (02) 6252 7612
      International migration
    (02) 6252 6522
      Internal migration
    (02) 6252 6141
      Registered marriages and divorces
    (02) 6252 6296
      Households and families
    (02) 6252 6141
      Population estimates
    (02) 6252 6420
      Indigenous population estimates and projections
    (02) 6252 7083
      Population projections
    (02) 6252 5580
      Household estimates
    (02) 6252 6027
      Service population estimates
    (08) 9360 5935
      Other
    (02) 6252 6639
      .
    (02) 6252 6411

Back to top of page



Commonwealth of Australia 2008

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.