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Newsletters - Health Statistics News - No 46, March 2003
 
 

CONTENTS


NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY USERS GUIDE

The National Health Survey Australia, 2001 User's Guide provides information relating to the 2001 National Health Survey (NHS) including: survey design and operation, health status indicators, health-related actions, heath risk factors, population characteristics, data quality and interpretation of results, data output and dissemination.

The Guide is now available online. Clients interested in gaining a better understanding of the statistics available from the 2001 National Health Survey are referred to the Users Guide, which was released in April. This link will take you to the 2001 NHS User's guide.

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2003 THEMATIC PUBLICATIONS - HEALTH SECTION

Thirteen theme based publications are planned for release this year. These are summarised in Table 1 and Table 2 below. Most of these publications are electronic only and will be made available for no charge on the ABS website. If you are interested in knowing more please email health@abs.gov.au or phone 1800 060 050. Orders for publications for which there is a charge should be directed via email to Client Services at client.services@abs.gov.au or telephone the National Mail Order Service on (02) 6252 5249.

Table 1 - Thematic publications - National Health Survey 2001

Title
Type of publication
No. of pages
2003 release date
Use of the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale in ABS Health Surveys
Electronic only - information paper
10
May 21
Measuring Dietary Habits in the 2001 National Health Survey
Electronic only - information paper
10
May 23
Long-term health conditions -- a guide to time series comparability from the National Health Survey
Electronic only - information paper
10
June 4
Vaccination Coverage in Australian Children - ABS statistics and the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR)
Electronic only - information paper
10
June 4
Breastfeeding in Australia
Electronic only - information paper
10
September 17
National Health Survey: Private Health Insurance
Electronic only - information paper
10
September 24
Health risk factors
Printed publication
30
November 12
National Health Survey: Injuries Australia 2001
Printed publication
30
November 19
National Health Survey: Mental Health, Australia, 2001
Printed publication
30
November 26

Table 2 - Thematic publications - deaths collection

Title
Type of publication
No. of pages
2003 release date
Information Paper: Suicides, Australia
Electronic only - information paper
22
currently available
Information Paper: Multiple Causes of Death Analysis
Electronic only - information paper
20
July 15
Information paper: Drug-induced Deaths, 1991-2001
Electronic only - information paper
6
July 15
Deaths from External Causes, Australia, 1997-2002
Printed publication
50
December 10


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ACCESS TO HEALTH SURVEY UNIT RECORD DATA

Micro data from the 2001 NHS in the form of confidentialised unit record files is expected to be available on CD-ROM and through the new Remote Access Data Laboratory (RADL) in April 2003. Proposals in regard to the content of these CURFs have been prepared based on the ABS understanding of user requirements.

A submission is also being developed for a second RADL CURF for the NHS to be released mid 2003. This CURF will provide a greater level of detail than the files released in April. Users are being consulted during the development of this submission.


Administrative arrangements for access to CURFs

The ABS is currently in the process of strengthening and streamlining administrative arrangements for access to CURFs. Application and Undertaking documentation have been reviewed, with revised arrangements placing greater responsibility on individual users to personally sign and observe undertakings concerning observance of the terms and conditions under which the information is disclosed. New documentation and procedures will be in effect for the NHS CURF releases in April 2003.


User education is a key element of the ABS strategy for enabling release of unit record files while protecting respondents from being identified. An education program on risk factors and obligations will be implemented from April 2003. All CURF users will be provided with an education manual, the ABS web site will provide training material and responses to frequently asked questions, and a series of awareness raising and training seminars will be held across Australia. A regular audit of compliance with the Undertaking will also be implemented. Consequences such as withdrawal of service, or legal action where appropriate, may follow where users are found to be using micro data inappropriately.

All clients wishing to access the NHS CURFs will need to refer to the ABS Website, Access to CURFS, and read the Responsible Access to ABS Confidentialised Unit Record Files (CURFs) Training Manual, and other relevant information, before downloading the Application and Undertaking to apply for access.


The Remote Access Data Laboratory

Through the RADL, clients can run secure on-line queries on approved CURFs from their desktop using SAS or SPSS software. STATA software is also being considered for inclusion in RADL from mid 2003. While the micro data remains within the confines of the ABS computing environment, clients can submit tailored queries to produce aggregated output and limited viewing of unit records according to their research needs. The RADL features protection and monitoring mechanisms which will allow tracking of user activity and manual clearance of jobs which require greater scrutiny. It is this level of control and user-transparency that will allow the ABS to safely provide CURF files on this system which have a greater level of detail than has previously been possible on CD-ROM. Future features of the RADL may support the analysis of augmented files and the ability to incorporate user-supplied statistical models.

More detail on the RADL is available on the ABS Website, Access to CURFs. As the 2001 NHS CURF will be the first new CURF released through the RADL we are keen to receive any feedback from users which can assist us in improving the service.

For further information on the RADL:
Contact: Mike Jones (02) 6252 5698
Email: mike.jones@abs.gov.au


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2003 SURVEY OF DISABILITY, AGEING AND CARERS

Enumeration of the 2003 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) is due to commence in June 2003 and will continue through to November 2003. Results from the survey are expected to be released from late May 2004.

This will be the 5th large scale survey of disability, ageing and carers conducted by the ABS since 1981. At the request of users of the survey data, the 2003 survey will be largely a repeat of the 1998 SDAC, with particular emphasis on maintaining comparability with measurement of 'disability' and 'severity of disability'. The survey will be conducted in about 13,000 private dwellings throughout Australia, and will also include about 800 cared accommodation establishments (hospitals, aged care accommodation, cared components of retirement villages and other homes with a cared component).

The SDAC has been developed in consultation with a range of government, professional, academic, industry and community organisations, to ensure it addresses the highest priority information needs. It seeks information on three key population groups: people aged 60 and over, people with disabilities and their carers. There are other sources of information about services provided to these groups, but this survey is the only source of information on their assistance requirements, the extent to which these requirements are met, and the characteristics of those with unmet need. It also provides information on participation in economic and community activities. The survey is the major source of national statistics on carers and primary carers: numbers and characteristics of carers, care relationships, activities for which informal care is provided, and for primary carers, support available and required, and the effects of the caring role on their lives.


For further information:
Contact : Ken Black (02) 6252 7430
Email:
ken.black@abs.gov.au

or

Contact: Margaret Sherley (02) 6252 5544
Email:
margaret.sherley@abs.gov.au

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DISABILITY AND THE 2006 CENSUS

The ABS recognises the potential value of obtaining disability data from the census and has a strong commitment to the development of a suitable Census question for the 2006 Census of Population and Housing.


Previous development and testing of a disability question for the 1996 and 2001 Census rounds was unsuccessful in terms of data quality. (See Themes - Disability, Ageing and Carers for a detailed report on the testing undertaken for 2001).

In preparation for the 2006 Census a Census Advisory Group on Disability (CAGD) was convened, with representatives from government, professional, academic, industry and community organisations. A key role of the group is to identify and prioritise the key requirements for disability data for small areas, and for a range of population groups, including relatively small subgroups. The first meeting of the CAGD was held in Feb 2003, with a key decision being made to focus development for Census 2006 on the concept of 'need for assistance' rather than the previously tested broader concept of disability. A series of focus group tests are planned for the first half of 2003, to be followed by a large scale test in August 2003, and a further large scale test in 2004.

For further information:
Contact : Ken Black (02) 6252 7430
Email:
ken.black@abs.gov.au

or

Contact: Margaret Sherley (02) 6252 5544
Email:
margaret.sherley@abs.gov.au

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AUSTRALIANS LIVE LONGER: MORTALITY INDICATORS IMPROVE

The latest statistics on mortality in Australia have been released in two ABS publications;
Deaths, Australia 2001 (cat. no. 3302.0) and Causes of Death, Australia 2001 (cat. no. 3303.0).


Mortality Statistics

In 2001, 128,540 deaths (66,830 males and 61,710 females) were registered in Australia, 250 more than in 2000 (128,290). There were 2,100 deaths registered in 2001 where the deceased was identified as being of Indigenous origin (Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or both origins). The median age at death in 2001 was 76 years for males and 82 years for females (an increase of 6 and 5 years respectively on 1981 median ages). The median age at death for Indigenous males was 52 years and 58 years for females.

Since 1981 the number of deaths has increased by an average of around 1% per year. The steady increase over time reflects the increasing size of the population and, in particular, an aging population. The death rate has declined 5% since 2000 and 36% since 1981, after accounting for the differences in the age structure of the population over the period.

Australia's 1999-2001 life expectancy at birth of 77 years for males and 82.4 years for females is amongst the highest in the world. Indigenous life expectancy at birth was approximately 20 years less than for the total population, at 56 years for Indigenous males and 63 years for Indigenous females. Regional life expectancy at birth in 1999-2001 for males and females varied across the regions of Australia by up to 11 years. Australia's more rural and remote populations had higher mortality rates and consequently lower life expectancy than populations living in capital cities and other urban areas.


Causes of Death

Malignant neoplasms (cancer) and ischaemic heart diseases accounted for almost half of the total deaths (29% and 20% respectively of all deaths). There were 2,454 deaths attributed to intentional self-harm (suicide) registered in 2001, 91 (3.9%) higher than the 2000 figure. The total number of drug induced deaths was 1,038, a 34% decrease in the number reported in 2000 (1,569).

For the 128,54 deaths registered, there were 364,473 causes reported (including 15,827 injuries) giving a mean of 2.8 causes per death. In 21% of all deaths, only one cause was reported. Of the 3,078 deaths where diabetes mellitus was assigned as the underlying cause, ischaemic heart diseases was an associated cause in 51% of these cases.

In 2001, there were 2,092 perinatal deaths registered at a rate of 8.4 per 1,000 to all relevant births, comprising of 1,290 fetal deaths and 802 neonatal deaths. This represented a marginal increase over the number of perinatal deaths and the rate registered in 2000 (2076 and 8.4 respectively)

While the majority of Causes of Death, Australia shows details on the causes for deaths that were registered in 2001, this issue also includes a new section and summary table showing the major causes of deaths that occurred in 2000, the latest year available. In Australia, 95% of deaths occurring in a particular year are registered in that year. However variations in this proportion can occur in certain sub-sets of the population and for particular causes of death. For instance, although 95% of the total 128,784 deaths that occurred in 2000 were registered in 2000, only 88% of the 2,111 Indigenous deaths and 93% of deaths due to external causes were registered in that year. The balance of these deaths that occurred in 2000 were registered in 2001.

For further information on Deaths, Australia 2001:
Contact: Jacqui Cristiano (02) 6252 5117
Email jacqui.cristiano@abs.gov.au

For further information on Causes of Death, Australia 2001:
Contact: Peter Burke (07) 3222 6069
Email: peter.burke@abs.gov.au

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MORTALITY DATA CUBES

In Australia, as in most other countries, the principal method of ensuring ready access of mortality data to the general community has traditionally been via paper publications, and more recently, electronic versions of these paper publications. Data is also available, on request, in non-identified unit record files, as well as special ad-hoc tabulations and is usually accessed by major key clients who have on going specialised data needs and the applications required to analyse these data sets.

With the advent of more user-friendly computer products, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), has investigated various methods by which it can make more statistical data readily available to a general audience. This has resulted in the development of a number of multidimensional datasets (known as data cubes), which can be easily manipulated by SuperTABLE (developed by Space-Time Research Pty Ltd), a powerful and extremely user-friendly electronic tabulation package.

ABS recognises that data cubes cannot fulfil total client needs. Major users of mortality data will still require finely disseminated data for all or most available variables and these needs are only satisfied by complete deaths files. Data cubes do however, address the data needs for a number of users who require more detail than that available in the hardcopy publication format.

As part of its mortality dissemination policy, ABS has loaded annual mortality data cubes to its website. These data cubes are produced as companions to Causes of Death, Australia 2001 (cat. no. 3303.0). They contain death counts for each ICD 3 digit code by age (5 year spans), sex and state and territory of usual residence. These cubes have been supplemented by a series of "thematic" or topic based data cubes for suicides and drug-induced deaths. Causes of Death, Australia 2001, Data Cube is available on the ABS website.

For further information:
Contact: Peter Burke (07) 3222 6069
Email: peter.burke@abs.gov.au

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MORTALITY ATLAS

Mortality Atlas, Australia (cat. no. 3318.0) is a new ABS publication. It is designed to highlight the differing spatial patterns of death rates across Australia and to explore the relationships between certain causes of death.The atlas presents maps showing geographic distribution of leading causes of death and other major causes for the period 1997-2000. It includes maps for selected ages, sex, underlying and multiple causes of death and combinations of causes using ABS mortality data. It highlights the differing spatial patterns of death rates across Australia and explores the relationships between certain causes of death. The causes of death in this publication are calculated on four years of aggregated data (deaths for years 1997 to 2000) classified to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems Tenth Revision (ICD10).

Mortality Atlas, Australia is available in hardcopy format only by contacting ABS bookshops or information services on 1300 135 070. For more information about cause of death statistics or data concepts contact Peter Burke on 1800 620 963.

For further information on the Mortality Atlas:
Contact: Tim Heywood (07) 3222 6047
Email: tim.heywood@abs.gov.au

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SUICIDES INFORMATION PAPER

Information Paper: Suicides, Australia, 2001 (cat. no. 3309.0.55.001) was released in February 2003. Using data derived from causes of death statistics, this new electronic publication provides an update on summary statistics regarding suicides registered in Australia in 2001. Data are presented separately by age and sex, method of suicide, and state or territory of usual residence. Numbers of deaths and standardised death rates for 1991 to 2001 (by year of registration and by year of occurrence) are shown for comparison.

For further information:
Contact: Chris Gordon (02) 6252 7318
Email: chris.gordon@abs.gov.au

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DRUG INDUCED DEATHS

An Information Paper: Drug-induced Deaths - A Guide to ABS Causes of Death Data (cat. no. 4809.0) was released on 9 September 2002.

This publication provides a guide to data on deaths resulting from drug use. It is designed to assist researchers and analysts in using causes of death data produced by the ABS. The information paper does not propose a uniform national standard; rather, it defines ABS terminology and classifications used to code drug deaths to specific causes and discusses problems associated with the identification of specific drugs of interest.

The process of defining deaths involving drugs is not straightforward. There are inconsistent definitions used in papers reporting drug related deaths; for example, some sources of information may refer to illicit drugs only, while other data may include pharmaceuticals in addition to illicit substances.

Comparing data from different sources presents problems as a result of the definitions used. In response to this problem and due to the demand for data on deaths caused by drugs, the ABS consulted with researchers to determine the most appropriate way of defining information relating to drug induced deaths. The Guide explains the ABS definition of drug-induced deaths and discusses issues which influence the definition.

For further information:
Contact: Peter Burke (07) 3222 6069
Email: peter.burke@abs.gov.au

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REVIEW OF SOCIO-ECONOMIC INDEXES FOR AREAS (SEIFA), 2001

The Review of SEIFA is now complete. After an extensive consultation process, the Review team released a Position Paper in January, which summarised the comments they had received and came to a position based on these comments. This paper was open for comment until the 7th February and positive feedback has been received from many users.

The new indexes which have now been calculated went to an ABS internal board meeting on the 10 March and are now going to an expert group and state ABS offices for validation. The final indexes with a user guide are due to be released in September 2003.

For further information:
Contact: Robert Tanton (02) 6252 5506
Email: robert.tanton@abs.gov.au

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2002-2101 AUSTRALIAN POPULATION PROJECTIONS

The Demography Section of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has commenced work on the 2002-2101 population projections for Australia, the states and territories, and for each capital city and balance of state/territory. It is proposed that the projections for Australia go out to the year 2101 while the state/territory and the capital city/balance of state/territory projections go out to 2051. The Population Projections, Australia (cat. no. 3222.0) publication is scheduled for release in July/August 2003.

The ABS uses the cohort-component method for these projections, which requires various assumptions to be made on future levels of fertility, mortality, overseas migration and interstate migration. This method begins with a base population for each sex by single years of age and advances it year by year by applying these assumptions. These assumptions are formulated on the basis of past demographic trends, both in Australia and overseas.


Proposed assumptions:


Fertility

It is proposed that there be three assumptions for Australia's future levels of fertility. They are;

1. Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) will increase to a high rate (1.9 babies per woman),
2. The TFR will decline slightly to a medium rate (1.6), or
3. The TFR will decline substantially to a low rate (1.4).

These rates are made in the context of recent trends in the TFR, especially those of the last decade.


Mortality

The trend in mortality has been a steady rise in the expectation of life at birth for both males and females. For the purpose of population projections the long-term mortality assumption is that life expectancy at birth will increase from the 1999-2001 level of 77.0 years for males and 82.4 years for females to 84.1 years for males and 87.6 years for females in 2050-2052. An alternative assumption is that the 1999-2001 life expectancy at birth will increase to 92.3 years for males and 95.2 years for females in 2050-2052.

These assumptions are based on the trend in life expectancy at birth during 1986-2001 for males and females. The first assumption assumes an increase in life expectancy at birth of 0.30 years for males and 0.25 years for females per year, continuing until 2006-2008 and then gradually declining over time. The alternative assumption is that the assumed rate of mortality improvement will continue through to 2051-2053.


Overseas migration

Given the high Migration Program numbers from 2002-03 together with the movement of New Zealander people to and from Australia, it is proposed that three assumptions will have net overseas migration reaching the levels of the 70,000, 100,000, and 125,000 by 2005-06. These levels will then remain constant for future years.


Interstate Migration

For state and territory population projections, three assumptions will also be made on interstate migration, they are: large movements between states and territories, medium movement and low movement.

For further information:
Contact: Katrina Phelan (02) 6252 6573
Email: katrina.phelan@abs.gov.au

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2001 CENSUS BASED ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION

The preliminary estimated resident population of Australia at September 2002, was 19,727,500 persons. The population increased by 252,000 persons (1.3%) since September 2001.


The September Quarter 2002 issue of Australian Demographic Statistics (cat. no. 3101.0), issued on 20 March 2003, contains estimates of the resident populations of Australia and the states and territories based on the results of the 2001 Census of Population and Housing. Quarterly estimates from September 1996 to June 2001 have been revised and are now final. Estimates for September 2001 to June 2002 have been revised to take account of this new information while estimates at September 2002 are preliminary.

For further information:
Contact: Anne Ward (02) 6252 6296
Email: anne.ward@abs.gov.au

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EXPERIMENTAL INDIGENOUS POPULATION ESTIMATES BASED ON 2001 CENSUS DATA

The ABS published the 30 June 2001 experimental estimate of the resident Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) population in Australian Demographic Statistics, September Quarter 2002 (cat. no. 3101.0). The estimated Indigenous population as at 30 June 2001 was 458,500 persons. This represents 2.4% of the total population (19,413,200). New South Wales had the largest Indigenous population at 30 June 2001, with 134,900, or 29.4% of the total Indigenous population, followed by Queensland with 27.5%.

The Indigenous population of the Northern Territory comprised 28.8% (56,900) of the total Northern Territory population at 30 June 2001. This is the highest proportion of any state or territory. The lowest was 0.6% (27,800) for Victoria.

For further information:
Contact: Moham Shahidullah (02) 6252 5129
Email: m.shahidullah@abs.gov.au

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SEXUAL ASSAULT INFORMATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN

An information paper - Sexual Assault Information Development Plan (cat. no. 4518.0) - is due for release in April 2003. The paper; contains an information development plan for data relating to sexual assault; provides a conceptual framework; identifies key policy issues and information needs; lists data sources available; identifies gaps in data; and proposes strategies to fill these gaps.

For further information:
Email: crime.justice@abs.gov.au.

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GENERAL SOCIAL SURVEY DATA

The initial release of data from the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) will occur with the publication of General Social Survey, Australia (cat. no. 4159.0), scheduled for June 2003.

The GSS is the first survey of its type conducted by the ABS. Rather than exploring a particular area of social concern in some detail, the GSS provides a wide range of information about the same individuals, therefore making it possible to examine linkages between different areas. For example, it will allow the exploration of the relationship between an individual's health status and their financial circumstances.

Among the topics covered in the GSS are health and disability; crime and safety; family and community; transport; education; work; income; financial stress; household assets and liabilities; and housing.

Where possible questions included in the GSS interview are identical (or very similar) to those included in other ABS surveys, enabling links back to more detailed data included in those surveys. Both national and state level estimates will be available from the survey. State level data will be available on the ABS website. A GSS Confidentialised Unit Record File (CURF) is expected for release in July 2003. A Remote Access Data Laboratory (RADL) is also expected to be available for the GSS. In addition, the ABS can provide customised GSS output on a fee for service basis.

For further information:
Contact: Graeme Groves (02) 6252 5943
Email: graeme.groves@abs.gov.au

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INDIGENOUS SOCIAL SURVEY

Enumeration of the first Indigenous Social Survey (ISS) commenced in August 2002 and was completed in April 2003. Information was collected by personal interview from Indigenous people aged 15 years and over throughout Australia, including those living in remote and very remote areas. The ISS will provide a range of information relating to the social, health and economic circumstances and cultural participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The topics included in the ISS are:
  • housing
  • education
  • employment
  • transport and mobility
  • health
  • sport
  • family and community
  • information technology
  • culture
  • crime and justice
  • income

Items included in the health topic are self-assessed health status, disability status, smoker status, alcohol consumption and substance use. At the broader level the ISS will allow the exploration of relationships between various dimensions of social concern such as health, housing, education and employment. The ISS shares many data items with the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) which will enable comparisons with the broader Australian population. It also has data items in common with the 1994 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey (NATSIS), making it possible to analyse changes over time.

Initial Results from the ISS will be published in a summary publication in November 2003. A summary of key issues will also be available on the ABS website.

For further information:
Contact: Grazyna Majchrzak-Hamilton (02) 6252 5055
Email: graz.hamilton@abs.gov.au.

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PUBLICATIONS RELEASED

APRIL 2001 - FEBRUARY 2003

3101.0Australian Demographic Statistics, September Quarter 2002 ($24.00)
3201.0 Population by Age and Sex, 2001 ($27.00)
3201.0.55.001Population by Age and Sex, Australian States and Territories, 2001 ($27.00)
3301.0Births, Australia, 2001 ($29.00)
3302.0Deaths, Australia, 2001 ($31.00)
3303.0Causes of Death, Australia, 2001 ($27.00)
3309.0. 55.001Information Paper Suicides, Australia (Free)
3318.0Mortality Atlas, Australia, 1997-2000 ($28.00)
4160.0Measuring Wellbeing: Frameworks for Australian Social Statistics, 2001 ($56.00)
4364.0National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2001 ($33.00)
4387.3Safety in the Home, Queensland, 2001 ($19.00)
4390.0Private Hospitals, Australia, 2001 ($22.00)
4390.0.40.001Private Health Establishments: Acute and Psychiatric Hospitals Data Report on Hardcopy, 2000-2001 ($505.00)
4390.0.40.002Private Health Establishments: Free Standing Day Hospital Facilities Data Report on Hardcopy, 2000-2001 ($200.00)
4443.1Disability, New South Wales, 2001 ($39.00)
4704.0The Health and Welfare of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, 2001 ($44.00)
4711.0Occasional Paper: Hospital Statistics, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, 1999 to 2000 ($28.00)
4715.0National Health Survey: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Results, Australia, 2001 ($30.00)
4808.0Illicit Drug Use, Sources of Australian Data, 2001 ($32.00)
4809.0Information Paper: Drug-Induced Deaths - A Guide to ABS Causes of Death Data ($10.00)
6285.0Involvement in Organised Sport and Physical Activity, Australia, 2001 ($22.00)
6324.0Work-Related Injuries, Australia, 2001 ($19.50)
8689.0Private Medical Practitioners, Australia, 2002 ($20.00)

These and all publications are available from ABS book shops in each capital city:

ABS Book ShopTelephone No.
Canberra:(02) 6252 6627
Adelaide:(08) 8237 7582
Sydney:1300 135 070
Hobart:(03) 6222 5811
Darwin:(08) 8943 2110
Melbourne:(03) 9615 7367 or (03) 9615 7998
Brisbane:(07) 3222 6350
Perth:(08) 9360 5360

Alternatively all ABS publications are available through the National Mail Order Service on (02) 6252 5249 or the Subscription Service on 1300 366 323 or by email: client.services@abs.gov.au. Publications are also available on the ABS website; www.abs.gov.au.

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ABOUT THIS NEWSLETTER

Health Statistics News is a quarterly publication from the Australian Bureau of Statistics Health Section, Canberra, available to interested individuals or organisations.

If you or your organisation would like to be placed on the Health Statistics Newsletter mailing list, please contact Tahlia Delmenico or Samuel Pietsch at the address shown below and provide your email address.

The Health Statistics Newsletter is also available through the ABS website.

Published by:

Australian Bureau of Statistics
Health Section
3N
PO Box 10
BELCONNEN ACT 2616

Contact: Tahlia Delmenico
Ph: (02) 6252 6317
Fax: (02) 6252 7784
Email: tahlia.delmenico@abs.gov.au

or

Contact: Samuel Pietsch
Ph: (02) 6252 6129
Fax: (02) 6252 7784
Email: samuel.pietsch@abs.gov.au

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