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Newsletters - National Centre for Culture and Recreation Statistics (NCCRS) - July Quarter 2003
 
 

CONTENTS

A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR
EMPLOYMENT IN CULTURE
EMPLOYMENT IN SPORT AND RECREATION
WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT VOLUNTEERS
CULTURAL TRADE IN GOODS AND SERVICES
AUSTRALIA'S LEVEL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IS INCREASING
ACCESSING CONFIDENTIALISED UNIT RECORD FILES (CURFS)
NCCRS CONTACT POINTS

A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR

Six months have gone by since our last newsletter, and in that time we have been very busy, with half a dozen publications or reports being released. These are described in this newsletter.

An exciting development in the near future will be the release of the first General Social Survey (GSS), which was conducted by the ABS between March and July 2002. The core content of the GSS brings together a wide range of information to enable it to be linked in ways not previously available. The focus is on the relationships between characteristics from different areas of social concern, rather than in depth information about a particular field. Topics include health, housing, education, work, income, financial stress, broad assets and liabilities, transport, family and community, and crime. It is expected that the new publication, General Social Survey, Australia (ABS cat. no. 4159.0) will provide an overview, through summary tables, for different population groups and selected themes. Surveys on Attendance at Selected Cultural Venues and Events, Sports Attendance, and Participation in Sports and Physical Activities, were conducted as supplements to the GSS. NCCRS has begun work on publications for each of these surveys. We expect to release these publications progressively, soon after the release of the GSS overview publication. If and when resources permit, the GSS will provide us with an opportunity to explore connections between attendance, participation and other aspects of people's lives.

We are pleased to announce that we have successfully negotiated continued funding to the NCCRS from our key clients, being the Standing Committee on Sport and Recreation (SCORS) and the Cultural Ministers Council (CMC). The contribution made by the key government agencies represented on these committees helps the ABS to sustain a national statistical focus on culture and recreation. We also appreciate the time and effort contributed by the staff of these agencies, and particularly those who participate on the statistical working group sub-committees.

We value the input provided from everyone who uses our statistics, and we are always happy to receive feedback. We look forward to ongoing lively debate regarding our statistical program and the use of culture and recreation data in future.

Lisa Conolly
Acting Director


EMPLOYMENT IN CULTURE

The five-yearly Census of Population and Housing provides the finest level of detail available from the ABS about the occupation and industry of each employed person's main job in the week prior to the Census. Using data from the 2001 Census (conducted on 7 August 2001) the NCCRS has produced a publication about people employed in cultural occupations and industries. People who had unpaid involvement in cultural activities, or who worked part-time in cultural activities but who had another job that they regarded as their main job in the week prior to the census, would not be recorded in the census as being in 'cultural' employment.

Of all those employed in Australia in the week prior to the 2001 Census, 259,909 (3.1%) people had their main job in a cultural occupation. By comparison, in 1996, 229,330 (3.0%) persons had their main job in a cultural occupation. Of those employed in a cultural occupation, the largest numbers were Printing tradespersons (27,679) and Graphic designers (21,144). In 2001, 56.1% (145,789) of all persons employed in cultural occupations as their main job were males and 43.9% (114,120) were females. In 1996, the percentage of females employed in cultural occupations (42.8%) was slightly lower.

The total number of persons employed in a cultural industry in their main job in the week prior to the 2001 Census was 299,266 (3.6% of employed persons), compared with 268,826 (3.5% of employed persons) in 1996. The 2001 Census showed that the largest cultural industries, in terms of people employed, were the Newspaper, book and stationery retailing industry (38,016 employed persons), the Architectural services industry (26,723 employed persons), the Advertising services industry (25,794 employed persons) and the Newspaper printing or publishing industry (25,737 employed persons).

People can either work in a cultural occupation in a cultural industry; in a cultural occupation but not in a cultural industry; or in a non-cultural occupation but in a cultural industry. In 2001, over half (51.0% or 132,585 persons) the people who were employed in a cultural occupation worked in a non-cultural industry. A librarian employed in a law firm is an example of a cultural occupation within a non-cultural industry. Of the 299,266 persons employed in a cultural industry, 57.5% (171,942) worked in a non-cultural occupation. A cleaner employed in a museum is an example of a non-cultural occupation within a cultural industry.

Some cultural industries are dominated by people employed in cultural occupations, while for others the percentage in cultural occupations is relatively small. Approximately 85.0% (7,941) of those employed in the Creative arts industry and 79.4% (9,102) of those employed in the Libraries industry worked in a cultural occupation. On the other hand, 16.4% of persons working in the Film and video distribution industry and 15.9% of persons working in the Parks and gardens industry were employed in a cultural occupation.

Main features of Employment in Culture, Australia, 2001 (cat. no. 6273.0) are available free of charge on this site.


EMPLOYMENT IN SPORT AND RECREATION

Of all those employed in Australia in the week prior to the 2001 Census, 83,008 persons (1.0%) had their main job in a sport and physical recreation occupation. In the 1996 Census, 68,289 persons (0.9% of all persons employed in Australia) had their main job in a sport and physical recreation occupation. This represents an increase of 21.6% for sport and recreation occupations since 1996, compared to an increase of 8.7% for all occupations. Of those employed in a sport and physical recreation occupation in 2001, the largest numbers were reported for Fitness instructors (12,364 persons) and Greenkeepers (11,928 persons).

For individual occupations, the largest increases, in terms of percentage change, were Outdoor adventure leaders (an increase of 560.2%, from 83 persons in 1996 to 548 persons in 2001), Sail makers (increased by 84.3%, from 235 to 433) and Fitness instructors (increased by 61.2% from 7,669 to 12,364). Fitness instructors also showed the largest growth in terms of the total number of persons employed, with an increase of 4,695 in the number of people who had their main job in this occupation.

A further 282,373 persons (or 3.4% of all persons employed in Australia had their main job in another leisure occupation. By comparison, in 1996, 243,280 persons (3.2%) had their main job in such an occupation. This represents an increase of 16.1% since 1996. The largest other leisure occupation groups in 2001 were Waiters (79,826 persons), Bar attendants (47,442 persons), Restaurant and catering managers (39,076 persons), Chefs (38,927 persons) and Cooks (37,992 persons).

Main features of Employment in Sport and Recreation, Australia, 2001 (cat. no. 4148.0) are available free of charge on this site.


WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT VOLUNTEERS?

In 2000, the ABS conducted a household survey to measure the extent to which Australians undertake voluntary work. A volunteer was defined as someone who willingly gave unpaid help, in the form of time, services or skills, through an organisation or group.

The ABS publication based on this survey, Voluntary Work, Australia, 2000 (cat. no. 4441.0; $22.00) showed that there were 4,395,600 people aged 18 years and over (32% of the population in that age group) who undertook voluntary work in the 12 months before interview. Further analysis by the NCCRS showed that, of these, 280,200 worked for heritage and arts organisations and 1,140,700 worked for sports and physical recreation organisations. For heritage and arts organisations, females outnumbered males (163,100 compared with 117,100), while for sports and physical recreation organisations, males outnumbered females (686,400 compared with 454,300).

Those working for heritage and arts organisations spent a total of 31 million hours in the year working for these organisations. This is the equivalent of about 18,000 people working full-time for an entire year. Volunteers spent a total of 130 million hours working for sports and physical recreation organisations, which is the equivalent of about 70,000 people working full-time for an entire year.

A considerable amount of information is available about these volunteers, for example, their demographic characteristics, their labour force status, the reasons they volunteered, the expenses they incurred, the types of organisations they assisted, the extent of their involvement, and the types of activities they undertook when volunteering. This information for heritage and arts volunteers is contained in the Cultural Ministers Council Statistics Working Group (CMC SWG) publication Australia's Cultural Volunteers 2000, which was prepared by the NCCRS, and can be found on the CMC SWG Web site at http://www.dicta.gov.au/swg. The equivalent information for volunteers working for sports and physical recreation organisations is contained in a report to the Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport and the Recreation and Sport Industry Statistics Group. For more information please contact Chris Giddings on (08) 8237 7326.


CULTURAL TRADE IN GOODS AND SERVICES

In 2000–01, Australia's exports of cultural goods totalled $478 million or 0.4% of all goods exported from Australia. By contrast, its imports of cultural goods were much higher, totalling $3,131 million, or 2.6% of all goods imported into Australia.

Most of Australia's trade in cultural goods was limited to a small number of countries. The two largest export markets were New Zealand (mainly books and magazines) and the United States of America (mainly artistic works, audio and video media, and books and magazines). The major countries supplying Australia with cultural goods were the United States of America and the United Kingdom (both mainly books and magazines), and Malaysia, China and Japan (mainly radios, TVs and hi-fi equipment).

Since 1994-95, the value of exports of cultural goods has generally increased each year, with the figure in 2000-01 being 55% higher than in 1994-95. By comparison, the value of exports of all goods from Australia was 78% higher. Since 1994-95, the value of imports of cultural goods has increased in almost all years. In 2000–01, the value of cultural goods imported was 36% higher than in 1994-95, while the value of imports of all goods into Australia was 58% higher.

In 2000-01, Australia earned $1,298 million through the provision of cultural and recreation services to the rest of the world. However, this figure was inflated by the inclusion of the sale of television rights to the Sydney 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games ($1,025 million). Payments to the rest of the world for the provision of cultural and recreational services (mainly royalties for television programs, films, videotapes and music) amounted to $944 million in 2000-01. Most trade in cultural and recreation services was with the United States of America.

Further information on cultural trade, such as the types of goods traded and the countries involved, as well as time series data, is contained in the Cultural Ministers Council Statistics Working Group publication Australia's Trade in Culture, 2000-01, which was prepared by the NCCRS. An electronic copy of the publication can be found on the CMC SWG web site at www.dcita.gov.au/swg.


AUSTRALIA'S LEVEL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IS INCREASING

The National Health Survey (NHS) collects information on levels of physical activity in the Australian population aged 18 years and over. Specifically, it asks questions about physical activity undertaken for exercise or recreation in the past two weeks. To date, this survey has been conducted in 1990, 1995 and 2001.

In a report recently prepared for the Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport, NCCRS analysed the changes over time of physical activity rates recorded in the 1990, 1995 and 2001 surveys. The 'physical activity rate' derived from the NHS is the proportion of the population aged 18 years and over who reported that they had done some physical activity in the past two weeks. NCCRS tested the statistical significance of changes in physical activity rates between each NHS reference period.

Results from the three survey years show that from 1990 to 2001 there had been a significant increase in the physical activity rate for all persons aged 18 years or over, from a rate of 64% in 1990 to 69% in 2001. Physical activity rates increased for both males (from 65% to 69%) and females (from 64% to 68%) in this 11-year period. Analysis was also undertaken for the states and the ACT, and similar increases were found. Data were not available for the Northern Territory.

The next NHS is currently scheduled to be conducted in 2004-05, with results to be available in the following year.

For further information on physical activity contact Colin Speechley on (08) 8237 7363.


ACCESSING CONFIDENTIALISED UNIT RECORD FILES (CURFS)

People wishing to undertake their own analysis of aspects of physical activity, or other issues covered by the 2001 National Health Survey can do so by accessing the confidentialised unit record file (CURF), which was released on 8 April 2003. The CURF is available on CD-ROM and via the new Remote Access Data Laboratory (RADL), a system which allows approved clients access to CURF data at their desktop via a secure Internet link. In addition to state and territory information, the RADL file also contains more detailed information than the CD-ROM file for a range of other variables. More information on the data content of both formats is available in the 2001 NHS CURF Information Paper, which can be downloaded from the ABS website.

With the release of the RADL, the ABS introduced new arrangements for accessing CURFs, including the requirement for both organisations and individual CURF users to submit applications and undertakings. The RADL is now available for clients to access all CURFs previously released on CD-ROM, in addition to the expanded version of the 2001 NHS CURF described above.

For further information, contact the ABS CURF Management Unit on (02) 6252 5731 or email intermediary.management@abs.gov.au.


NCCRS CONTACT POINTS

Email: nccrs@abs.gov.au

Culture Topics: Chris Giddings on (08) 8237 7326

Sport Topics: Colin Speechley on (08) 8237 7363

Director: Lisa Conolly on (08) 8237 7402

Fax: (08) 8237 7366

Address:
National Centre for Culture and Recreation Statistics
Australian Bureau of Statistics
GPO Box 2272
ADELAIDE, SA, 5001

ABS Internet site: http://www.abs.gov.au



Commonwealth of Australia 2008

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