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3311.0.55.001 - Demography, Australia, 2002  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 05/05/2004   
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OVERVIEW

This release provides a summary of key Australian demographic data for 2002 and with related releases (follow the links below) replaces previous hard copy Demography publications for each State and Territory. More recent data are released quarterly in Australian Demographic Statistics (cat. no. 3101.0).

POPULATION
BIRTHS AND CONFINEMENTS
DEATHS
MIGRATION
MARRIAGES
DIVORCES


Inquiries

For further information about these and related statistics, contact the National Information and Referral Service on 1300 135 070 or Rachael Hill on (02) 6252 6296 or rachael.hill@abs.gov.au.


SUMMARY


POPULATION

In the 12 months to 31 December 2002 the Australian resident population was estimated to have increased by 228,600 persons and reached 19,757,900 (9,810,100 males and 9,947,800 females). Over three-quarters of the population resided in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland in 2002 (comprising 34%, 25% and 19% of the Australian population respectively). The two territories comprised the smallest proportion of the Australian population, with the ACT accounting for 1.6% of the population, and the Northern Territory accounting for 1%.

The rate of growth of the Australian population was 1.2% in 2002. The population in every state and territory in Australia increased during this time, with Queensland experiencing the highest level of growth at 2.3%. Queensland's population increased 85,300 persons, accounting for 37% of Australia's total population growth in 2002. Western Australia and Victoria with growth rates of 1.2% and 1.1% were the only other states to experience growth greater than 1%. The lowest rate of growth was experienced in the Northern Territory (0.1%), followed by Tasmania (0.4%) and South Australia (0.5%).

POPULATION GROWTH, 2002
Graph - Population Growth, 2002



All states experienced positive natural increase and net overseas migration, while Queensland and Victoria were the only states to experience positive net interstate migration. Net overseas migration to Australia accounted for just under half of the total Australian population increase in 2002.

POPULATION, 2002

NSW
Vic.
Qld
SA
WA
Tas.
NT
ACT
Aust.(a)

Estimated resident population('000)
6,662.2
4,885.0
3,754.2
1,522.5
1,936.9
474.3
198.1
322.2
19,757.9

Components of population change(b)
Natural increase(c)no.
40,570
26,031
23,324
5,712
12,263
1,974
2,806
2,650
115,373
Net overseas migrationno.
43,900
26,491
23,326
2,777
15,597
260
368
545
113,249
Net interstate migrationno.
-30,392
1,922
38,656
-1,537
-4,231
-117
-3,069
-1,232
. .
Total increaseno.
54,078
54,444
85,306
6,952
23,629
2,117
105
1,963
228,622

Annual growth rate

%

0.82

1.13

2.33

0.46

1.24

0.45

0.05

0.61

1.17


np - not for publication.
(a) Includes Jervis Bay Territory, Christmas Island and Cocos (Keeling) Islands.
(b) From previous year.
(c) Births and deaths figures used to compile natural increase for population estimates are based on year of occurrence and may differ from births and deaths data based on year of registration displayed in the Births and Confinements table and the Deaths table below.
BIRTHS AND CONFINEMENTS

During 2002 there were 251,000 births registered in Australia, from 246,800 mothers (confinements). The three most populous states accounted for over three-quarters of registered births in 2002 with 86,600 births to mothers usually resident in New South Wales (34% of all births), 61,500 in Victoria (24%) and 47,800 in Queensland (19%). There were 3,700 births to mothers usually resident in the Northern Territory (1.5%), which accounted for the smallest proportion of all births in Australia. The sex ratio for every state and territory in Australia was greater than 100, ranging from 101.1 male births per 100 female births in Tasmania to a rate of 106.3 in the Northern Territory.

The total fertility rate (TFR), that is the average number of babies that a woman could expect to bear during her reproductive lifetime was 1.75 children per woman for Australia. The Northern Territory experienced the highest TFR (2.28 children per woman) and was the only state or territory to experience a TFR equal to or greater than the replacement rate of 2.1. Tasmania had the second highest TFR with a rate of 1.96. While the Australian Capital Territory experienced the lowest TFR, with 1.59. The Northern Territory also experienced the highest crude birth rate with 18.7 births per 1,000 population, this was well above the national rate of 12.8. The lowest crude birth rate was 11.6 in South Australia.

In 2002, there were 172,600 nuptial births, representing 69% of births in Australia in that year. Victoria had the highest proportion of nuptial births of all the states and territories, accounting for 74% of all births in that state. This was followed by the Australian Capital Territory where 73% of all births were nuptial births, and New South Wales with 72%. The proportion of exnuptial births was greatest in the Northern Territory where it accounted for 62% of all births in that state, followed by Tasmania where 47% of births were exnuptial.

EXNUPTIAL BIRTHS, Proportion of total births - 2002
Graph - Exnuptial Births, Proportion of total births - 2002


The median age for mothers giving birth in Australia was 30.2 years. The oldest mothers were recorded in Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory with median ages of 31 years and 30.7 years respectively. The oldest fathers were also recorded in Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory, with median ages of 33 years and 32.8 years respectively. The youngest mothers were in the Northern Territory with a median age of 28.1 years, and in Tasmania with a median age of 28.9 years. Tasmania and the Northern Territory also had the youngest fathers, with median ages of 31.3 years and 31.6 years respectively.

BIRTHS AND CONFINEMENTS(a), 2002

NSW
Vic.
Qld
SA
WA
Tas.
NT
ACT
Aust.(b)

Live births
Numberno.
86,583
61,478
47,771
17,665
23,601
6003
3,724
4,112
250,988
Crude birth raterate
13.1
12.7
12.9
11.6
12.3
12.7
18.7
12.8
12.8
Total fertility raterate
1.796
1.679
1.773
1.723
1.688
1.964
2.281
1.591
1.752
Net reproduction raterate
0.866
0.805
0.853
0.831
0.813
0.972
1.067
0.778
0.843

All confinements
Numberno.
85,178
60,435
46,934
17,354
23,232
5,914
3,675
4,048
246,821
Median age of motheryears
30.3
31.0
29.5
30.4
29.9
28.9
28.1
30.7
30.2

Nuptial confinements
Numberno.
61,213
44,546
29,680
11,362
15,059
3,134
1,390
2,956
169,385
Median age of motheryears
31.0
31.6
30.8
31.6
31.1
30.7
31.3
31.4
31.2
Median age of fatheryears
33.4
33.6
32.8
33.6
33.3
32.8
33.6
33.5
33.3

First nuptial confinements
Numberno.
26,251
19,235
12,044
4,846
6,180
1,275
563
1,284
71,691
Median age of motheryears
29.9
30.5
29.7
30.4
30.1
29.6
30.1
30.4
30.1


(a) Compiled on year of registration basis.
(b) Includes Jervis Bay Territory, Christmas Island and Cocos (Keeling) Islands.


DEATHS

There were 133,700 deaths in Australia in 2002 with 46,400 (35% of total deaths) registered to persons usually resident in New South Wales, 33,800 (25%) in Victoria, and 24,000 (18%) in Queensland. Australia had a sex ratio of 106.3 male deaths per 100 female deaths, and ranged from 92.8 male deaths per 100 female deaths in the ACT to a rate of 110.4 in Queensland.

The crude death rate (CDR) for Australia was 6.8 deaths per 1,000 population in 2002. Similarly the standardised death rate (SDR), which eliminates the effect of the changing age structure of the population was 6.7 deaths per 1,000 standard population. CDRs ranged from 4.3 deaths per 1,000 population in the Australian Capital Territory to 8.4 in Tasmania. The Australian Capital Territory also experienced the lowest SDR which was 5.9 deaths per 1,000 standard population. The Northern Territory experienced the highest SDR at 9.0 deaths per 1,000 standard population, this was 34% higher than the Australian SDR.

DEATH RATES (a), 2002
Graph - Death Rates, 2002
(a) Standardised death rates per 1,000 population.
Standardised to the 2001 Australian total population.


In 2002 life expectancy at birth was 77.4 years for males, and 82.6 years for females. The highest life expectancy for both males and females was in the ACT, where the expectation of life at birth for males was 79.2 years, and 83.3 years for females. The lowest life expectancy for males and females was recorded in the Northern Territory where the expectation of life at birth was 71.3 years and 76.7 years respectively. The median age of death was also lowest in the Northern Territory for both males (55.9 years) and females (55.8 years), well below the national values of 76.2 years for males and 82.2 years for females. The median age at death was highest in South Australia, with 77.2 years for males and 82.7 years for females.

The infant mortality rate (IMR) for Australia was 5 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2002. The Northern Territory had an IMR of 11.3, much higher than any other state of territory. The second highest IMR was 6.2 in Tasmania.

DEATHS(a), 2002

NSW
Vic.
Qld
SA
WA
Tas.
NT
ACT
Aust.(b)

Numberno.
46,384
33,772
23,968
11,987
11,326
3,979
911
1,373
133,707
Crude death raterate
7.0
7.0
6.5
7.9
5.9
8.4
4.6
4.3
6.8
Standardised death raterate
6.6
6.6
6.8
6.7
6.4
7.6
9.0
5.9
6.7

Median age at death
Malesyears
76.2
76.8
75.6
77.2
75.4
76.2
55.9
76.4
76.2
Femalesyears
82.2
82.5
81.9
82.7
81.8
81.9
55.8
81.5
82.2

Infant deaths
Numberno.
397
305
277
90
102
37
42
14
1,264
Infant mortality raterate
4.6
5.0
5.8
5.1
4.3
6.2
11.3
3.4
5.0

Life expectancy at birth
Malesyears
77.3
77.8
77.2
77.3
77.9
76.5
71.3
79.2
77.4
Femalesyears
82.6
82.8
82.4
82.6
82.9
81.3
76.7
83.3
82.6

(a) Compiled on year of registration basis.
(b) Includes Other Territories.


MIGRATION

In 2002 Australia gained 113,200 persons through net overseas migration (NOM). This was the result of 362,000 permanent and long-term arrivals outnumbering 222,900 permanent and long-term departures. Every state and territory increased its population through NOM. The largest gain was to New South Wales, with an increase of 43,900 persons (this accounted for 39% of the Australian NOM). While the smallest increase was to Tasmania, gaining 260 persons.

In 2002 it was estimated that 399,400 persons moved interstate. Queensland and Victoria were the only two states to experience a net interstate migration gain in 2002. The greatest increase was in Queensland gaining 38,700 persons, followed by Victoria which gained 1,900 persons due to net interstate migration. All other states and territories experienced net interstate losses of varying magnitude, with the largest loss recorded by New South Wales (30,400 persons). Tasmania had the smallest population loss due to net interstate migration, losing 120 persons.

NET MIGRATION, 2002
Graph - Net Migration, 2002


The largest interstate flows in 2002 were between New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland. The most common move was from New South Wales to Queensland (63,500 persons or 16% of all interstate movers). This flow was much greater than the next largest flow, from Queensland to New South Wales (38,200 persons or 10% of all interstate movers). Queensland continued to be the most popular destination for Australian moving interstate, receiving the largest number of arrivals during 2002 (119,600 persons). Over half of Queensland arrivals came from New South Wales (53%), followed by Victoria (21%) and Western Australia (7.5%). Migrants from South Australia and Tasmania were most likely to move to Victoria. Similarly migrants to South Australia and Tasmania were most likely to come from neighbouring Victoria. There was a high degree of movement between the Australian Capital Territory and surrounding New South Wales.

MIGRATION, 2002

NSW
Vic.
Qld
SA
WA
Tas.
NT
ACT
Aust.(a)

Overseas migration
Permanent and Long-term movement(b)
Arrivalsno.
146,436
86,338
62,708
14,082
39,960
2,722
2,590
7,137
361,988
Departures no.
93,614
49,992
36,804
9,696
21,800
2,217
2,367
6,421
222,940
Net Overseas Migration(c)no.
43,900
26,491
23,326
2,777
15,597
260
368
545
113,249

Interstate migration
Arrivalsno.
94,982
75,681
119,562
30,092
29,869
14,560
15,113
19,575
399,434
Departuresno.
125,374
73,759
80,906
31,629
34,100
14,677
18,182
20,807
399,434
Net interstate migrationno.
-30,392
1,922
38,656
-1,537
-4,231
-117
-3,069
-1,232
. .


(a) Includes Other Territories.
(b) Based on stated intention on arrival or departure.
(c) Includes migration adjustment. Please refer to the Explanatory Notes for further details.


MARRIAGES

There were 105,400 marriages registered in Australia in 2002, of these 66% were marriages in which neither party had been previously married and 15% involved both parties remarrying. The proportion of marriages in which neither party had been previously married ranged from 61% in Tasmania to 68% in New South Wales and Victoria. Tasmania had the highest proportion of marriages in which both parties were remarrying (19%), while New South Wales had the lowest (14%).

The crude marriage rate for Australia was 5.4 marriages per 1,000 population. The lowest crude marriage rate was in the Northern Territory (3.8 marriages) and the highest was in Queensland (5.7 marriages).

The median age for brides and bridegrooms was highest in the Northern Territory, 29.4 years and 32.3 years respectively, well above the national median ages of 28.9 years for brides and 31 years for bridegrooms. The lowest median age for brides was 28.6 years in New South Wales, while the lowest median age for bridegrooms was 30.7 years in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory.

MARRIAGES, 2002

NSW
Vic.
Qld
SA
WA
Tas.
NT
ACT
Aust.(a)

Number registeredno.
36,321
25,058
21,264
7,373
10,484
2,605
747
1,583
105,435
Crude marriage raterate
5.5
5.2
5.7
4.9
5.4
5.5
3.8
4.9
5.4

Median age at marriage
Bridegroomyears
30.7
30.9
31.1
31.1
31.6
31.6
32.3
30.7
31.0
Brideyears
28.6
29.1
29.0
28.8
29.3
29.1
29.4
28.7
28.9

(a) Includes Other Territories.

DIVORCES

Divorce data for 2002 is not yet available. Please see Paragraph 21 of the Explanatory Notes for more information.


RELATED LINKS

3101.0 Australian Demographic Statistics
3201.0 Population by Age and Sex, State and Territories
3218.0 Regional Population Growth, Australia and New Zealand
3222.0 Population Projections, Australia
3230.0 Experimental Estimates of the Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Population
3231.0 Experimental Projections of the Indigenous Population
3236.0 Household and Family Projections, Australia
3301.0 Births, Australia
3302.0 Deaths, Australia
3303.0 Causes of Death, Australia
3412.0 Migration, Australia
3105.0.65.001 Australian Historical Population Statistics

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