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3412.0 - Migration, Australia, 2010-11 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 15/08/2012   
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Contents >> Net Interstate Migration >> Net Interstate Migration

NET INTERSTATE MIGRATION

Net interstate migration (NIM) is the net gain or loss of population through the movement of people from one state or territory of usual residence to another. It is an important component required to calculate Australia's estimated resident population at the state and territory level, see Australian Demographic Statistics Quarterly (cat. no. 3101.0). During 2010-11, it was estimated that 337,900 people moved interstate. This is a 2% increase from the number of people who moved in the previous year (331,400 persons).

3.1 Interstate migration flows - 2010-11(a)
Graph: 3.1 Interstate migration flows—2010–11(a)


Net interstate migration can be a source of population gain or loss for a state. In the year ended 30 June 2011, it was a source of population loss for New South Wales, South Australia, the Northern Territory and Tasmania, with net losses of 13,200 persons, 2,600 persons, 2,500 persons and 50 persons respectively. Those states and territories where NIM contributed positively to population growth were Queensland (7,200 persons), Western Australia (6,200 persons), Victoria (3,800 persons), and the Australian Capital Territory (1,400 persons).

3.2 NET INTERSTATE MIGRATION(a) - 2001-02 to 2010-11

NSW
Vic.
Qld
SA
WA
Tas.
NT
ACT

2001-02
-25 102
3 609
30 035
-1 308
-3 582
-1 423
-1 998
-197
2002-03
-32 467
-743
37 984
-1 191
-1 972
1 993
-2 768
-802
2003-04
-31 098
-3 051
35 498
-2 910
2 095
2 574
-1 487
-1 586
2004-05
-26 321
-3 070
30 371
-3 226
2 241
267
610
-842
2005-06
-25 576
-1 831
26 607
-2 711
3 933
-82
-553
258
2006-07
-27 404
-2 418
27 044
-3 658
5 188
-926
253
1 921
2007-08
-21 937
-2 736
23 088
-4 499
4 808
344
1 197
-265
2008-09
-19 831
698
18 388
-4 676
4 825
672
746
-822
2009-10
-10 540
2 555
9 576
-2 964
1 962
322
-842
-69
2010-11
-13 218
3 759
7 150
-2 613
6 163
-47
-2 549
1 355
Annual average 2001-02 to 2010-11
-23 349
-323
24 574
-2 976
2 566
369
-739
-105

(a) Estimates for 2006-07 to 2010-11 are preliminary - see Explanatory Notes 9-10.


Over the decade ending June 2011, Queensland consistently recorded an annual NIM gain from the rest of the country. However, over the last 10 years the gain in NIM has gradually declined. In 2002-03, Queensland gained 38,000 persons compared with a net gain of 7,200 persons in 2010-11.

Western Australia recorded an average net gain in the past 10 years due to the gains recorded from 2003-04 onwards; gains which ranged between 2,000 persons in 2009-10 to 6,200 persons in 2010-11. In the first two years of the past decade, NIM losses ranging between 2,000 persons and 3,600 persons were recorded in Western Australia.

Tasmania's NIM fluctuated throughout the past decade with slightly more net gains than net losses. Tasmania experienced high net losses in the first year of the past decade and in 2006-07. Since 2002-03, Tasmania has generally had more positive flows into the state.

The remaining states and territories recorded NIM losses with New South Wales recording the largest annual average net loss (23,300 persons) followed by South Australia (3,000 persons), the Northern Territory (740 persons), Victoria (320 persons) and the Australian Capital Territory (100 persons).


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