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4147.4.55.001 - Culture and Recreation News, Sep 2012  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 25/09/2012   
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PERSPECTIVES ON SPORT


Latest edition of Perspectives on Sport

The Perspectives on Sport series aims to address topical issues within sport and physical recreation in Australia. The following articles were featured in the recent release Perspectives on Sport, July 2012 (cat. no. 4156.0.55.001):

  • Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation by People with a Disability
  • What are the Odds? Variables affecting Children's Participation in Organised Sport and Dancing
  • Children's Participation in Organised Sports and Dancing, A Pseudo-Longitudinal Analysis 2000 to 2009

'Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation by People with a Disability' used data from the 2010 iteration of the General Social Survey, Australia, to compare sport and physical activity participation rates of people with, and without, a disability. Key findings include:
  • In 2010, over two thirds of people with a disability were participating in sport and physical recreation activities (68% or 4.6 million), compared with just over three quarters of people without a disability (79% or 7.9 million).
  • People with an intellectual disability, or a head injury, stroke or brain damage related disability, had lower participation rates (55% and 53% respectively), than people with other types of disability.

'What are the Odds? Variables affecting Children's Participation in Organised Sport and Dancing' used data from Children's Participation in Cultural and Leisure Activities, Australia, April 2009 (cat. no. 4901.0) and multiple logistic regression analysis to determine relationships between selected variables. Key findings include:
  • Children who participated in extra-curricular activities such as playing a musical instrument, singing or drama, were more likely to be physically active.
  • Putting the nerd stereotype to rest, 71% of children who did homework were also involved in sports compared with only 56% of students who did not do homework activities.

'Children's Participation in Organised Sports and Dancing, A Pseudo-Longitudinal Analysis 2000 to 2009' used survey data for the years 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2009 from Children's Participation in Cultural and Leisure Activities, Australia (cat. no. 4901.0). This article provided an update of the findings of the pseudo-longitudinal dataset presented in Research Paper: Children’s Participation in Organised Sporting Activity, Oct 2009 (cat. no. 1351.0.55.028). Key findings include:
  • Participation was found to increase to a peak at 9-11 years before declining with age.
  • In 2009 the overall participation rate (70%) for children aged 6-14 years was significantly higher than in 2000 (67%).

Please refer to Perspectives on Sport, July 2012 (cat. no. 4156.0.55.001) for more information.


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