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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011 Quality Declaration 
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Population change

State and territory highlights

Capital city growth

Outer suburban growth

Inner-city growth

Urban infill

Growth along the coast

Growth in inland areas

Population decline

Population change by Remoteness Areas

Population density

Centre of population


POPULATION CHANGE

Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) reached 22.3 million at 30 June 2011, increasing by 2.9 million people or 15% since 30 June 2001.

All states and territories experienced population growth between 2001 and 2011, with the largest increases in Australia's three most populous states. Queensland had the greatest growth (up by 845,200 people), followed by Victoria (729,800) and New South Wales (636,300).

Western Australia had the fastest growth, increasing by 24% in the ten years to 2011, followed by Queensland (23%) and the Northern Territory (17%). Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory grew by 15%, equal to Australia. The remaining states all had growth below the Australian average, with New South Wales at 10% and South Australia and Tasmania both at 8%.

Population growth between 2001 and 2011 was most prominent in outer suburbs, the inner-city, urban infill areas and along the coast. Areas that have seen decline include inland, rural areas that have been affected by drought and well-established suburbs within capital cities, as can be seen in the following map which shows the population change of Statistical Areas Level 2 (SA2s) over this period.

SA2 POPULATION CHANGE, Australia - 2001-11
Diagram: SA2 POPULATION CHANGE, Australia—2001–11


STATE AND TERRITORY HIGHLIGHTS

New South Wales
  • Three-quarters of all population growth in New South Wales between June 2001 and June 2011 was in Greater Sydney.
  • The SA2s with the largest growth were Parklea - Kellyville Ridge (up 18,700 people) and Kellyville (11,900), both in the capital city's north west-growth corridor.


Victoria
  • Greater Melbourne had the largest growth of all the capital cities (up 647,200 people) in the ten years ending June 2011.
  • Growth in the outer suburbs of Greater Melbourne between 2001 and 2011 contributed the most to Victoria's population growth.


Queensland
  • Between June 2001 and June 2011, Greater Brisbane's population increased by 25% (or 432,300 people), the second fastest capital city growth in Australia.
  • Springfield Lakes, in Greater Brisbane, grew from zero population in 2001 to 10,600 people in 2011.


South Australia
  • Pooraka, in Greater Adelaide's north, and inner-city Adelaide recorded the largest population growth in the ten years to June 2011, up 10,100 and 7,000 people respectively.
  • Munno Para West - Angle Vale, north of Adelaide's central business district was the fastest-growing SA2 within Greater Adelaide, increasing by 125% to 7,900 people.


Western Australia
  • Greater Perth had the fastest growth of all capital cities in Australia (26%) in the ten years to June 2011. Most of this growth occurred in the outer suburban fringes of the city.
  • The Pilbara had the largest and fastest population increase (23,300 people or 59%) for an SA3 outside Greater Perth.


Tasmania
  • Greater Hobart grew by 18,000 people between June 2001 and June 2011, while the remainder of state grew by 21,400 people. Tasmania was the only state or territory where the growth in the greater capital city was smaller than that in the rest of the state.
  • The SA2s with the fastest growth were Brighton - Pontville (up 55%), Margate - Snug (37%) and Austins Ferry - Granton (36%), all in Greater Hobart.


Northern Territory
  • Greater Darwin's population increased at nearly twice the rate (21%) of the rest of the Northern Territory (12%) over the ten years to June 2011.
  • The SA2s with the largest growth were Darwin City, Rosebery - Bellamack and Palmerston - North (all increasing by 3,000 people).

Australian Capital Territory
  • The combined population of the northern SA3s increased by 46,000 people in the ten years to June 2011 while the southern SA3s only grew by 2,400.
  • Gungahlin had the largest growth of all SA3s, more than doubling from 24,400 to 49,700 people.


CAPITAL CITY GROWTH

At June 2011, more than 14.7 million people, close to two-thirds of Australia's population, resided in a capital city. The combined population of capital cities increased by 2.1 million people in the ten years to 2011.

Greater Melbourne recorded the largest growth of all capital cities between 2001 and 2011, increasing by 647,200 people, followed by Greater Sydney (up 477,600 people) and Greater Brisbane (432,300). Greater Melbourne grew by an average of more than 1,200 people per week, while the population of Greater Sydney increased by over 900 people per week.

The population of Australia's capital cities grew by 17% between 2001 and 2011, faster than the remainder of Australia (11%). Greater Perth had the fastest growth of all capital cities at 26%, ahead of Greater Brisbane (25%). The slowest growth was in Greater Hobart (9.1%) and Greater Adelaide (9.4%).

OUTER SUBURBAN GROWTH

Many areas which experienced large growth were located on the fringes of capital cities, where more land tends to be available for subdivision and housing development. The five SA2s with the largest growth in the country between June 2001 and June 2011 were all on the outskirts of Greater Melbourne. The population of South Morang increased by 32,200, followed by Point Cook (up 31,300 people), Caroline Springs (21,400), Tarneit (21,000) and Craigieburn - Mickleham (19,200).

Among the SA2s in New South Wales with the largest population increases over the ten years to 2011 were the adjoining Parklea - Kellyville Ridge (up 18,700 people), Kellyville (11,900), and Rouse Hill - Beaumont Hill (9,300). These areas are all located on the north-western fringes of Sydney.

In Western Australia, the SA2s of Ellenbrook to the north-east of Perth's central business district, and Canning Vale - East to the south, recorded large growth in the ten years to 2011, increasing by 17,700 and 15,600 people respectively.

In Queensland, the largest growth between 2001 and 2011 occurred in the outer suburban SA2 of North Lakes - Mango Hill (up 17,100 people) in the north of Greater Brisbane. Springfield Lakes, south-west of Brisbane's central business district, also had large growth, increasing in population by 10,600.

Outer suburban areas in the smaller capital cities also experienced some of the strongest growth in their states or territories in the ten years to 2011. Among the areas with the largest population increases in South Australia were the outer Adelaide SA2s of Pooraka (up 10,100 people) and Aldinga (6,100). In the Australian Capital Territory, the neighbouring SA2s of Gungahlin and Harrison, on the territory's northern fringe increased by 5,800 and 4,500 people respectively while on the outskirts of Greater Darwin, the population of both Rosebery - Bellamack and nearby Palmertson - North increased by 3,000 people. In Tasmania, the outer suburban Kingston - Huntingfield had the largest growth in the state, increasing by 2,600 people.

INNER-CITY GROWTH

The inner-city SA2s of Melbourne and Perth City had population increases among the largest in Australia between June 2001 and June 2011, increasing by 14,200 and 13,900 people respectively. Other inner-city SA2s to experience large growth included Waterloo - Beaconsfield (up 11,500 people), to the south of Sydney's central business district, and Sydney - Haymarket - The Rocks (10,500). Inner-city areas also had some of the largest growth in the other states and territories. The SA2 of Darwin City had the largest growth in the Northern Territory, increasing by 3,000 people while Adelaide (up 7,000 people) had the second-largest growth in South Australia.

Docklands, which adjoins Melbourne's central business district, was the fastest-growing of all inner city SA2s, increasing from 160 to 6,200 people (or almost 50% per year) in the ten years to 2011. Brisbane City (up from 2,800 to 9,400) and Melbourne (up from 7,700 to 21,900) also had rapid growth.

URBAN INFILL

Urban infill is the development of a site within an already-developed area, either by building housing on land that was previously vacant or used for non-residential purposes, or by replacing low-density housing with higher-density dwellings. Infill development is becoming more common on transport corridors, near commercial hubs and in suburbs where there are older houses on large blocks of land.

In addition to some inner-city areas, urban infill contributed to large population growth in SA2s such as Kingsbury (up 4,800 people) and Maribyrnong (4,700) in Victoria, Pyrmont - Ultimo (8,700) and Parramatta - Rosehill (7,200) in New South Wales and Nollamara - Westminster (4,500) and Stirling - Osborne Park (4,300) in Western Australia.

GROWTH ALONG THE COAST

Generally, the most prominent growth outside of capital cities occurred along the coast of Australia, particularly in Queensland. Several SA2s on Queensland's Gold and Sunshine Coasts experienced large growth in the ten years to June 2011, including Upper Coomera - Willow Vale (up 16,800 people), Pacific Pines - Gaven (11,500) and Caloundra - West (9,900). Deeragun, west of Townsville's central business district, also had a large increase in population, up 8,000 people.

On Australia's western seaboard, Gelorup - Dalyellup - Stratham (up 7,200 people) and Busselton (5,800), both to the south of Greater Perth, and Karratha (6,600) to the north had large growth. Gelorup - Dalyellup - Stratham also had the fastest growth outside of Greater Perth, increasing at an average annual rate of 13% between 2001 and 2011.

In New South Wales, Shellharbour - Flinders had both the largest and fastest increase in population outside of Greater Sydney, increasing by 5,700 people or 69% in the ten years to 2011. Other SA2s with large growth included Wollongong (up 4,700 people) and Tweed Heads - South (4,600). The largest growth in Victoria outside of Greater Melbourne was in the neighbouring Geelong SA2s of Grovedale (up 5,400 people) and Torquay (5,000) while in South Australia, the seaside areas of Victor Harbor and Goolwa - Port Elliott both increased by more than 2,500 people.

GROWTH IN INLAND AREAS

Some inland areas outside of capital cities had strong growth in the ten years to June 2011. Large inland growth occurred in the Highfields SA2 (up 4,900 people) in Queensland's Toowoomba region, Queanbeyan Region (4,200) which borders the Australian Capital Territory, Toowoomba - West (3,800) and Traralgon (3,800) in Victoria's Latrobe Valley.

Rapid growth also occurred in some of the country's inland areas, with a number of SA2s including Highfields in Queensland, Strathfieldsaye and Maiden Gully which surround the town of Bendigo in Victoria, and Newman and Chittering in Western Australia, all increasing by more than 50% between 2001 and 2011.

POPULATION DECLINE

Population declines between June 2001 and June 2011 were most prominent in inland, rural areas, particularly in New South Wales and Victoria, and well-established areas within capital cities.

The largest declines in the ten years to 2011 were in the SA2s of Broken Hill (down 2,000 people) in far west New South Wales, and Griffith Region (down 1,700) in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area. Also in New South Wales, Walgett - Lightning Ridge, Moree and Orange each declined by more than 1,400 people. In north-west Victoria, the SA2s of Gannawarra and Yarriambiack, declined by 1,200 and 1,100 people respectively. Many of these areas have been affected by drought during this ten year period.

A number of well-established areas within capital cities also had large declines in population. This can happen as the population of these areas gets older and households move through the life cycle. The SA2 of Modbury Heights in Greater Adelaide's north-east declined by 1,700 people between 2001 and 2011. Other established areas with large declines over this period included Minto - St Andrews (down 1,600 people) in Greater Sydney's outer south-west and Wheelers Hill (down 1,600) and Kings Park (down 1,500) within Greater Melbourne.

Some of the fastest population declines in the country occurred inland, including the rural SA2s of Outback (down 27%) in South Australia, Mildura Region (down 21%) in north-west Victoria, and Narrabri Region (down 20%) in northern New South Wales.

POPULATION CHANGE BY REMOTENESS AREAS

The Remoteness Structure of the Australian Standard Geographical Classification breaks Australia down into five Remoteness Area (RA) categories, ranging from Major Cities to Very Remote. As at June 2011, 69% of the population resided in Australia's major cities. In comparison, just 2.3% lived in remote or very remote Australia. Major cities were the fastest-growing RAs in Australia, up 17% in the ten years to June 2011. The remaining RAs grew slower than Australia as a whole (15%), with remote areas growing at the slowest rate (3.8%).

The Australian Capital Territory (99.8%), Victoria (76%) and New South Wales and South Australia (both 73%) had the greatest proportion of their populations living in the major cities RA while Tasmania had the highest percentage (65%) living in inner regional Australia, which includes Hobart. The Northern Territory had the highest proportion of its population living in outer regional Australia (56%), which includes Darwin, as well as remote and very remote Australia (both 22%).

Between 2001 and 2011, major cities were the fastest-growing RAs in Queensland (27%), Victoria (18%) and New South Wales (11%), while inner regional areas were the fastest-growing in Western Australia (41%), South Australia (16%) and Tasmania (8.6%). Outer regional RAs had the fastest growth in the Northern Territory (21%).

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION BY REMOTENESS STRUCTURE(a)

ERP AT 30 JUNE
CHANGE
2001
2011pr
2001-2011pr
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Major Cities
4 756 671
5 295 728
539 057
11.3
Inner Regional
1 326 844
1 436 745
109 901
8.3
Outer Regional
449 102
442 387
-6 715
-1.5
Remote
37 368
32 191
-5 177
-13.9
Very Remote
5 232
4 417
-815
-15.6
Total
6 575 217
7 211 468
636 251
9.7
Vic.
Major Cities
3 561 468
4 195 976
634 508
17.8
Inner Regional
990 245
1 087 651
97 406
9.8
Outer Regional
247 799
246 455
-1 344
-0.5
Remote
5 214
4 444
-770
-14.8
Total
4 804 726
5 534 526
729 800
15.2
Qld
Major Cities
2 140 027
2 715 743
575 716
26.9
Inner Regional
789 856
958 313
168 457
21.3
Outer Regional
562 459
661 321
98 862
17.6
Remote
85 456
87 172
1 716
2.0
Very Remote
51 148
51 549
401
0.8
Total
3 628 946
4 474 098
845 152
23.3
SA
Major Cities
1 099 813
1 198 438
98 625
9.0
Inner Regional
173 002
201 501
28 499
16.5
Outer Regional
178 682
177 911
-771
-0.4
Remote
43 821
45 757
1 936
4.4
Very Remote
16 410
14 625
-1 785
-10.9
Total
1 511 728
1 638 232
126 504
8.4
WA
Major Cities
1 355 276
1 676 314
321 038
23.7
Inner Regional
221 166
310 794
89 628
40.5
Outer Regional
186 134
200 259
14 125
7.6
Remote
90 913
99 167
8 254
9.1
Very Remote
47 670
65 681
18 011
37.8
Total
1 901 159
2 352 215
451 056
23.7
Tas.
Inner Regional
304 811
331 136
26 325
8.6
Outer Regional
156 763
169 934
13 171
8.4
Remote
7 610
7 675
65
0.9
Very Remote
2 611
2 450
-161
-6.2
Total
471 795
511 195
39 400
8.4
NT
Outer Regional
107 693
130 050
22 357
20.8
Remote
44 434
50 358
5 924
13.3
Very Remote
45 641
50 923
5 282
11.6
Total
197 768
231 331
33 563
17.0
ACT
Major Cities
318 661
367 136
48 475
15.2
Inner Regional
656
616
-40
-6.1
Total
319 317
367 752
48 435
15.2
Australia(b)
Major Cities
13 231 916
15 449 335
2 217 419
16.8
Inner Regional
3 807 122
4 327 143
520 021
13.7
Outer Regional
1 888 632
2 028 317
139 685
7.4
Remote
314 816
326 764
11 948
3.8
Very Remote
170 754
192 374
21 620
12.7
Total
19 413 240
22 323 933
2 910 693
15.0

(a) See paragraphs 21 and 22 of the Explanatory Notes.
(b) Includes Other Territories


POPULATION DENSITY

Population density varies greatly across Australia, ranging from very low in remote areas to very high in inner-city areas. Australia's population density at June 2011 was 2.9 people per square kilometre (sq km). Among the states and territories, the Australian Capital Territory had the highest population density at 160 people per sq km, followed by Victoria with 24, New South Wales with 9.0 and Tasmania with 7.5. The remaining states and territories all had population densities below the Australian figure, with the Northern Territory having the lowest at just 0.2 people per sq km.

Population density at June 2011 was highest within capital cites, particularly in Greater Sydney. Eight of the top ten most densely-populated SA2s were in Greater Sydney, including Pyrmont - Ultimo and Potts Point - Woolloomooloo, which had the highest population densities in Australia (both 13,500 people per sq km), and Darlinghurst and Surry Hills (both 12,800). These areas all surround Sydney's central business district.

Within Greater Melbourne, the SA2s with the greatest population densities were inner-city Melbourne (9,200 people per sq km) and the neighbouring Carlton (8,400). In Greater Brisbane, New Farm (5,900) and Kangaroo Point (5,800) had the highest population densities.

At the other end of the scale, there were over 200 SA2s in Australia which had population densities of less than one person per sq km at June 2011, over two-fifths of which were in Queensland and Western Australia.

In the ten years to 2011, the SA2 with the largest increase in population density was inner-city Melbourne, which added an extra 6,000 people per sq km. This was followed by Pyrmont - Ultimo (5,800) and Waterloo - Beaconsfield (3,200), both in Greater Sydney.

POPULATION DENSITY BY SA2, Australia - June 2011
Diagram: POPULATION DENSITY BY SA2, Australia—June 2011


CENTRE OF POPULATION

The centre of population is one way in which the spatial distribution of Australia's population can be described. This point marks the average latitude and longitude around which the population is distributed.

Australia's centre of population at June 2011 was 39 kilometres east of the small service town of Ivanhoe, in western New South Wales. This reflects the concentration of population in south-east Australia. The centre of population moved 21 kilometres north-west in the ten years from 2001 to 2011. This shift reflects strong population growth in Queensland and Western Australia over this period.

CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia - June 2001 and June 2011
Diagram: CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia—June 2001 and June 2011

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION, States and Territories - Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (GCCSAs)

ERP AT 30 JUNE
CHANGE
2001
2011pr
2001-2011pr
GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Greater Sydney
4 128 347
4 605 992
477 645
11.6
Rest of NSW
2 446 870
2 605 476
158 606
6.5
Total
6 575 217
7 211 468
636 251
9.7
Vic.
Greater Melbourne
3 521 939
4 169 103
647 164
18.4
Rest of Vic.
1 282 787
1 365 423
82 636
6.4
Total
4 804 726
5 534 526
729 800
15.2
Qld
Greater Brisbane
1 714 320
2 146 577
432 257
25.2
Rest of Qld
1 914 626
2 327 521
412 895
21.6
Total
3 628 946
4 474 098
845 152
23.3
SA
Greater Adelaide
1 154 742
1 262 940
108 198
9.4
Rest of SA
356 986
375 292
18 306
5.1
Total
1 511 728
1 638 232
126 504
8.4
WA
Greater Perth
1 452 058
1 832 114
380 056
26.2
Rest of WA
449 101
520 101
71 000
15.8
Total
1 901 159
2 352 215
451 056
23.7
Tas.
Greater Hobart
198 296
216 276
17 980
9.1
Rest of Tas.
273 499
294 919
21 420
7.8
Total
471 795
511 195
39 400
8.4
NT
Greater Darwin
106 842
129 062
22 220
20.8
Rest of NT
90 926
102 269
11 343
12.5
Total
197 768
231 331
33 563
17.0
Australian Capital Territory
319 317
367 752
48 435
15.2
Other Territories
2 584
3 116
532
20.6
Australia(a)
Greater Capital City
12 595 861
14 729 816
2 133 955
16.9
Rest of Australia
6 817 379
7 594 117
776 738
11.4
Total
19 413 240
22 323 933
2 910 693
15.0

(a) Includes Other Territories

SA3s WITH LARGEST AND FASTEST POPULATION GROWTH IN 2001-2011

ERP at 30 June
Change
2001
2011pr
2001-2011pr
National rank & SA3(a) GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

LARGEST GROWTH

1 Wyndham Greater Melbourne
91 749
170 691
78 942
86.0
2 Wanneroo Greater Perth
84 132
160 332
76 200
90.6
3 Melton - Bacchus Marsh Greater Melbourne
65 516
127 813
62 297
95.1
4 Casey - South Greater Melbourne
76 823
131 760
54 937
71.5
5 Sydney Inner City Greater Sydney
133 993
188 920
54 927
41.0
6 Ormeau - Oxenford Rest of Qld
46 857
96 481
49 624
105.9
7 Whittlesea - Wallan Greater Melbourne
126 083
172 591
46 508
36.9
8 Melbourne City Greater Melbourne
55 742
100 603
44 861
80.5
9 Townsville Rest of Qld
144 824
180 461
35 637
24.6
10 Rockingham Greater Perth
74 018
109 101
35 083
47.4
11 Tullamarine - Broadmeadows Greater Melbourne
107 233
139 077
31 844
29.7
12 Springfield - Redbank Greater Brisbane
38 021
68 534
30 513
80.3
13 Blacktown - North Greater Sydney
47 327
77 345
30 018
63.4
14 Stirling Greater Perth
160 251
189 944
29 693
18.5
15 Swan Greater Perth
79 794
108 572
28 778
36.1
16 Gosnells Greater Perth
83 474
112 244
28 770
34.5
17 Cardinia Greater Melbourne
47 157
75 739
28 582
60.6
18 Mandurah Greater Perth
59 012
87 528
28 516
48.3
19 North Lakes Greater Brisbane
24 520
52 919
28 399
115.8
20 Cockburn Greater Perth
66 605
92 909
26 304
39.5

FASTEST GROWTH

1 North Lakes Greater Brisbane
24 520
52 919
28 399
115.8
2 Ormeau - Oxenford Rest of Qld
46 857
96 481
49 624
105.9
3 Gungahlin Australian Capital Territory
24 398
49 734
25 336
103.8
4 Melton - Bacchus Marsh Greater Melbourne
65 516
127 813
62 297
95.1
5 Wanneroo Greater Perth
84 132
160 332
76 200
90.6
6 Wyndham Greater Melbourne
91 749
170 691
78 942
86.0
7 Melbourne City Greater Melbourne
55 742
100 603
44 861
80.5
8 Springfield - Redbank Greater Brisbane
38 021
68 534
30 513
80.3
9 Casey - South Greater Melbourne
76 823
131 760
54 937
71.5
10 Blacktown - North Greater Sydney
47 327
77 345
30 018
63.4
11 Cardinia Greater Melbourne
47 157
75 739
28 582
60.6
12 Pilbara Rest of WA
39 461
62 736
23 275
59.0
13 Serpentine - Jarrahdale Greater Perth
11 748
18 531
6 783
57.7
14 Adelaide City Greater Adelaide
13 289
20 950
7 661
57.6
15 Robina Rest of Qld
30 270
47 235
16 965
56.0
16 Brisbane Inner Greater Brisbane
39 491
61 589
22 098
56.0
17 Rocklea - Acacia Ridge Greater Brisbane
36 584
55 981
19 397
53.0
18 Rouse Hill - McGraths Hill Greater Sydney
18 646
28 103
9 457
50.7
19 Jimboomba Greater Brisbane
25 478
38 259
12 781
50.2
20 Mandurah Greater Perth
59 012
87 528
28 516
48.3

(a) National Rank based on population change between June 2001 and June 2011. See paragraphs 26 and 27 of the Explanatory Notes.

SA3s WITH LARGEST AND FASTEST POPULATION DECLINES IN 2001-2011

ERP at 30 June
Change
2001
2011pr
2001-2011pr
National rank & SA3(a) GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

LARGEST DECLINES

1 Bourke - Cobar - Coonamble Rest of NSW
30 826
26 733
-4 093
-13.3
2 Moree - Narrabri Rest of NSW
30 338
26 981
-3 357
-11.1
3 Grampians Rest of Vic.
62 937
59 894
-3 043
-4.8
4 Murray River - Swan Hill Rest of Vic.
40 735
37 753
-2 982
-7.3
5 Lachlan Valley Rest of NSW
59 467
56 565
-2 902
-4.9
6 Broken Hill and Far West Rest of NSW
24 403
21 976
-2 427
-9.9
7 Outback - South Rest of Qld
22 403
20 562
-1 841
-8.2
8 Tuggeranong Australian Capital Territory
90 875
89 131
-1 744
-1.9
9 Griffith - Murrumbidgee (West) Rest of NSW
49 958
48 296
-1 662
-3.3
10 Tea Tree Gully Greater Adelaide
95 433
93 976
-1 457
-1.5

FASTEST DECLINES

1 Bourke - Cobar - Coonamble Rest of NSW
30 826
26 733
-4 093
-13.3
2 Moree - Narrabri Rest of NSW
30 338
26 981
-3 357
-11.1
3 Broken Hill and Far West Rest of NSW
24 403
21 976
-2 427
-9.9
4 Lower Murray Rest of NSW
14 134
12 796
-1 338
-9.5
5 Outback - South Rest of Qld
22 403
20 562
-1 841
-8.2
6 Murray River - Swan Hill Rest of Vic.
40 735
37 753
-2 982
-7.3
7 Loddon - Elmore Rest of Vic.
12 116
11 271
-845
-7.0
8 Gascoyne Rest of WA
10 306
9 621
-685
-6.6
9 Lachlan Valley Rest of NSW
59 467
56 565
-2 902
-4.9
10 Grampians Rest of Vic.
62 937
59 894
-3 043
-4.8

(a) National Rank based on population change between June 2001 and June 2011. See paragraphs 26 and 27 of the Explanatory Notes.


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