4660.0 - Energy Use, Electricity Generation and Environmental Management, Australia, 2014-15 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 12/07/2016   
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2014-15 KEY POINTS
  • This publication presents information on electricity generation, energy use and environmental management practices of Australian businesses for 2014–15. The estimates are produced from the Energy, Water and Environment Survey (EWES) 2014–15. In the analysis below, the consumption estimates have been converted to gigajoules (GJ) to enable comparability across the varying energy and fuel products. The consumption estimates in the data cubes contain the units of measure as collected in EWES 2014–15. For more information about the scope and methodology please refer to the Explanatory Notes in this issue.
  • This commentary includes analysis by business size, which is defined as follows:
    • large businesses, with over 200 or more employees;
    • medium businesses, with over 20 and less than 200 employees;
    • small businesses, with less than 20 employees.
  • Key energy and fuel products, defined as electricity, natural gas, liquified petroleum gas (LPG), diesel and petrol, are presented in the table below. A total of $46.5 billion (b) was spent on these products in 2014-15, with diesel being the largest contributor at $19.8b. The Mining industry accounted for $7.3b of this expenditure.
  • Other selected industries which consists mainly of non energy intensive industries purchased the largest amount of electricity in the economy, spending $11.3b of the $19.0b spent in the year.
  • Electricity generation from non-renewable sources (including coal, natural gas and petroleum products) comprised 88% of the total electricity produced by Australian businesses in 2014–15. Renewable energy sources accounted for the remaining 12%. Of this, hydro accounted for 5% and wind 4%.
  • Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste services generated the most electricity in 2014–15. This was followed by the Mining and Manufacturing industries, which generated 36% and 14% respectively, of their total electricity consumption.
  • In 2014–15 the Manufacturing industry generated 8.3 million (m) GJ of electricity from renewable sources. Their largest renewable inputs were biofuel and bagasse. For finer level information on electricity generation please refer to the 'Energy consumption, expenditure and generation, Australian, 2014-15' data cube on the Downloads page.


Consumption of and expenditure on electricity, natural gas and other energy inputs, by selected industries, Australia 2014-15


Mining
Manufacturing
Electricity,
Gas, Water and
Waste Services
Transport, Postal and Warehousing
Other selected
industries(c)
Total selected
industries

Energy or fuel type

ElectricityExpenditure
$m
1 980.6
4 149.0
683.9
903.3
11 288.3
19 005.0
Consumption

GJ
77 778 000.0
183 102 840.0
23 348 880.0
20 604 600.0
198 092 880.0
502 927 200.0
Natural gasExpenditure
$m
601.3
1 947.6
1 326.1
50.8
^1 029.0
4 954.9
Consumption

GJ
70 223 941.5
326 647 084.5
335 585 061.5
13 714 973.6
^56 314 719.6
802 485 780.6
LPGExpenditure
$m
31.4
119.7
4.5
*119.0
*263.6
^538.3
Consumption

GJ
1 968.9
6 449.1
216.2
*6 413.8
*13 267.7
^28 315.7
Diesel(a)Expenditure
$m
7 257.4
838.4
753.4
6 211.6
^4 773.7
19 834.7
Consumption

GJ
261 897 140.0
26 799 980.0
23 584 600.0
204 873 360.0
^148 498 060.0
665 653 140.0
Petrol(b)Expenditure
$m
23.3
206.3
^58.4
^210.9
^1 637.1
2 136.0
Consumption
GJ
^615 760.0
5 462 720.0
^1,541,120.0
^5 497 120.0
^41 785 680.0
54 902 400.0


Note: All product consumption data is presented in Gigajoules (GJ) to provide comparability.
(a) Includes biodiesel blends.
(b) Includes E10.
(c) Includes divisions A, E, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R and S. Refer to the Explanatory Notes for a description of ANZSIC.
^ estimate has a relative standard error of 10% to less than 25% and should be used with caution.
* estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to less than 50% and should be used with caution.


ENERGY CONSUMPTION
The following graphs display each industry and product type with its respective contribution to key data items in 2014-15.

Graph Image for Energy use by industry, Australia 2014-15

Source(s): Energy Use, Electricity Generation and Environmental Management, Australia (cat. no.4660.0)



Graph Image for Energy use by product type, Australia, 2014-15

Footnote(s): (a) Includes LPG, fuel oil and compressed natural gas. (b) Includes liquid biofuel, biogas, wood and wood waste and bagasse.

Source(s): Energy Use, Electricity Generation and Environmental Management, Australia (cat. no.4660.0)

  • The Manufacturing and Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste services industries were the two largest energy users in 2014–15, consuming 2.2b and 2.1b GJ of energy respectively. Black coal, crude oil and natural gas were their largest energy sources, with the majority of this energy used to produce electricity and petroleum products for industry and household consumption.
  • Australian businesses consumed 666m GJ of diesel in 2014–15. The Mining and Transport, Postal and Warehousing industries combined accounted for 70% of the total consumption.
  • The Manufacturing industry was the largest user of purchased electricity in 2014–15, using 183m GJ of the 503m GJ used by Australian industry.
  • Of the total purchased electricity consumed by Australian businesses in 2014–15 (excluding self-generation), 71% was used by large businesses, compared with 16% for small and 13% for medium sized businesses. For more information on energy consumption by business please refer to the 'Energy consumption, expenditure and generation, Australian, 2014–15' data cube on the Downloads page.


ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

This graph displays efforts to improve energy and water efficiency by business size in 2014-15.

Graph Image for Environmental management, Australia 2014-15

Source(s): Energy Use, Electricity Generation and Environmental Management, Australia (cat. no.4660.0)

  • Large businesses were more likely to attempt to improve the energy and water efficiency of their business, with 75% reporting they aimed to improve energy efficiency and 58% reporting they aimed to improve water efficiency.
  • Environmental management activities were undertaken by 36% of Australian businesses in 2014-15. Across all business sizes, the top motivators for implementing environmental management improvements were cost saving and compliance with government regulations. For more information on environmental management activities by selected Australian industries please refer to the 'Environmental management, Australia, 2014–15' data cube on the Downloads page.