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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2003  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/01/2003   
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Contents >> Transport >> Domestic passenger activity

People travel within Australia for many reasons, including school, business, recreation and travel to and from work. This section provides details of rail and air passenger activity within Australia.

Rail passenger activity

The number of passengers carried by private and government rail operators is shown in table 23.17. Since 1992-93 there have been annual increases in the number of rail passengers, urban and non-urban passengers increasing by 27.3% and 65.7% respectively. Heavy rail has consistently accounted for more than three-quarters of urban rail passenger operations.


23.17 RAIL PASSENGER OPERATIONS(a)

Urban

Heavy rail
Tram and light rail
Total
Non-urban
Total
million persons
million persons
million persons
million persons
million persons

1992-93
396
103
498
7
505
1993-94
402
106
507
8
516
1994-95
420
111
530
9
539
1995-96
441
116
556
9
566
1996-97
456
118
574
10
584
1997-98
457
121
578
10
588
1998-99
463
123
585
10
595
1999-2000
482
137
619
11
629
2000-01
498
137
634
12
646

(a) Excludes historical and tourist services. There are no rail passenger services in Tas., NT or ACT.

Source: Australasian Railway Association Inc.


Air passenger activity

As at 30 June 2002 there were two major domestic carriers operating in Australia, Qantas and Virgin Blue. A third major domestic carrier, Ansett Australia, ceased operations in September 2001. As at 30 June 2002, 27 regional operators provided regular public transport air services to about 170 airports in Australia.

The Aircraft fleet section provides details of domestic fleets.

Total passenger departures increased by 13.4% over the five years to 2001, with the largest increase (7.3%) occurring between 1999 and 2000 (table 23.18). The major domestic and regional airlines both increased their number of passengers over these five years. In 2001, the major domestic airlines accounted for 82.1% of total Australian domestic passenger departures. Over the five years to 2001, the regional airlines increased their share of passenger departures from 16.8% in 1997 to 17.9% in 2001.

The major domestic airlines reduced the overall ratio of vacant seat kilometres to distance travelled between 1997 and 2000. In 2000 the ratio was 22.6%, down from 25.6% in 1997. However, in 2001 this ratio increased to 23.5%.


23.18 DOMESTIC AIRLINE ACTIVITY

Units
1997
1998
1999
2000(a)
2001(a)

Passenger departures(b)
Domestic airlines
'000
23,375
23,575
24,392
25,660
26,152
Regional airlines
'000
4,713
4,851
5,039
5,929
5,700
Total
'000
28,088
28,426
29,431
31,590
31,852
Other activity (domestic airlines only)
Passenger kilometres performed(c)
million
26,357
26,774
27,853
29,601
30,410
Seat kilometres available(d)
million
35,403
35,467
36,119
38,232
39,739
Percentage of vacant seat kilometres
%
25.6
24.5
22.9
22.6
23.5

(a) Includes estimates for regional airlines data.
(b) The unit of measurement is traffic on board (which includes transit traffic). Includes revenue passengers only.
(c) The sum for all flights of the number of passengers on each flight multiplied by the distance travelled.
(d) The sum for all flights of the number of seats on a flight multiplied by distance travelled.

Source: Department of Transport and Regional Services.


Table 23.19 shows the number of passengers boarding or departing by major domestic and regional airlines at the main airports. In 2001 all capital city airports except Darwin, Canberra and Perth recorded increased passenger movements compared with 2000. Hobart recorded the strongest growth (with 42.9%), followed by Brisbane (12.9%), Adelaide (5.8%), Melbourne (2.9%) and Sydney (1.8%). Sydney airport recorded 16.6 million passenger movements, Melbourne airport 13.3 million movements and Brisbane almost 10 million movements. Of the smaller airports Launceston recorded the highest growth in movements between 2000 and 2001 (72.2%), followed by Townsville (23.7%).

By contrast, passenger movements at Darwin airport dropped by 6.5% over the same period, and movements at Canberra and Perth airports both fell by 3.5%.


23.19 PASSENGER MOVEMENTS(a) WITH MAJOR DOMESTIC AND REGIONAL AIRLINES AT PRINCIPAL AIRPORTS

1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
Airport
'000
'000
'000
'000
'000

Sydney
14,070
(b)14,276
(b)14,879
16,265
(b)16,565
Melbourne
11,228
11,429
(b)11,902
12,939
(b)13,308
Brisbane
7,470
(b)7,438
(b)7,833
8,811
(b)9,951
Adelaide
3,636
(b)3,789
(b)3,869
3,982
(b)4,212
Perth
3,153
3,236
3,258
3,463
3,342
Canberra
1,788
1,805
1,901
2,041
(b)1,970
Hobart
832
(b)856
(b)878
928
(b)1,326
Darwin
823
854
(b)879
907
(b)848
Cairns
1,918
1,916
(b)2,023
2,133
(b)2,025
Coolangatta
1,918
1,889
(b)1,938
1,918
(b)1,795
Townsville
686
(b)704
(b)740
772
(b)955
Launceston
559
536
(b)545
532
(b)916

(a) The number of passengers on board arriving at or departing from each airport. Includes passengers in transit who are counted as both arrivals and departures at airports through which they transit.
(b) Includes estimates for unreported data.

Source: Department of Transport and Regional Services.


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