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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 1996 to 2006  
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Image: Population Change States and Territories - Includes: Summary of Population Change Findings for the States and TerritoriesPOPULATION CHANGE - STATES AND TERRITORIES

NEW SOUTH WALES
VICTORIA
QUEENSLAND
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
TASMANIA
NORTHERN TERRITORY
AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY



NEW SOUTH WALES

STATE SUMMARY

At June 2006 the estimated resident population of New South Wales (NSW) was 6.82 million. During the five years from June 2001 to June 2006 the population of NSW increased by 242,000 people, at an average annual growth rate of 0.7%.


POPULATION CHANGE IN THE SYDNEY SD

At June 2006, 63% (4.28 million people) of NSW's population resided in the Sydney SD. Population growth in the Sydney SD accounted for 65% (156,100 people) of NSW's total population growth between June 2001 and June 2006. Similar to NSW the Sydney SD had an annual average growth rate of 0.7%. This was lower than the corresponding rate of 1.2% recorded in the previous five-year period.


Growth in Sydney SD

From June 2001 to June 2006, NSW's five largest increases in LGA populations all occurred in the Sydney SD. The inner city LGA of Sydney (C) experienced the largest population increase (34,900 people), followed by the outer suburban LGAs of Baulkham Hills (A) (19,900) and Blacktown (C) (15,000), both located in the north-west of Sydney SD. Liverpool (C) (in western Sydney), and Auburn (A) (in central western Sydney) also recorded large growth, increasing by 11,600 and 9,400 people respectively.


The Sydney (C) LGA was also the fastest growing LGA in NSW, recording an annual average growth rate of 4.9% during the five years to June 2006. Auburn (A) recorded the second fastest growth of LGAs in Sydney SD, increasing at an average annual rate of 3.0% (third fastest in NSW) followed by Strathfield (A) (2.7% per year) and Baulkham Hills (A) (2.6% per year).

LGAs with largest and fastest population growth, New South Wales

ERP AT 30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Growth

Sydney (C)
164 500
34 900
4.9
Baulkham Hills (A)
165 900
19 900
2.6
Blacktown (C)
279 800
15 000
1.1
Liverpool (C)
170 600
11 600
1.4
Auburn (A)
68 100
9 400
3.0

Fastest Growth

Sydney (C)
164 500
34 900
4.9
Palerang (A)
12 900
2 000
3.5
Auburn (A)
68 100
9 400
3.0
Maitland (C)
64 800
8 300
2.8
Strathfield (A)
33 600
4 200
2.7

(a) Average annual growth rate.


Population losses in Sydney SD

Ten of Sydney's 43 LGAs experienced population losses between June 2001 and June 2006. The largest losses were recorded in the south-western LGAs of Campbelltown (C) and Fairfield (C) which decreased by 3,000 and 2,600 people respectively. Campbelltown (C)also had the fastest population decline in the Sydney SD recording an annual average decrease of 0.4%.


POPULATION CHANGE IN THE REMAINDER OF NSW

Most NSW SDs recorded slower rates of growth between June 2001 and June 2006 compared with the preceding five years. In the five years to June 2006, the Hunter SD recorded the largest population increase in the remainder of NSW, increasing by 29,400 people (1.0% per year). The fastest growth rates between June 2001 and June 2006 were recorded in the NSW coastal SDs of South Eastern (1.4% per year) and Richmond-Tweed and Mid-North Coast (both 1.2% per year).


Three SDs in NSW recorded population losses between 2001 and 2006. North Western SD declined by 4,000 people, Far West SD by 1,500 people and Northern SD by 1,400 people. Far West SD recorded the fastest population decline, down 1.3% per year on average.


Coastal change

At June 2006 there were 1.35 million people residing in the 21 NSW coastal LGAs (LGAs outside the Sydney SD that have boundaries adjoining the sea). These residents represented 19.8% of NSW's total population. Combined, these areas recorded a population increase of 63,600 people (an average 1.0% per year) between June 2001 and June 2006.


All coastal LGAs in NSW experienced population growth in the five years to June 2006. However, 15 of these LGAs recorded lower rates of growth than those recorded between June 1996 and June 2001.


The largest and fastest population growth between June 2001 and June 2006 was recorded in Tweed (A), on the state's far north coast, with an increase of 8,400 people (up 2.2% per year). The next largest population increase was recorded in the city of Newcastle (C) (7,000 people), followed by the mid-north coastal LGAs of Hastings (A) (6,000) and Coffs Harbour (C) (5,000). Hastings (A) recorded the second fastest growth of coastal LGAs, increasing by 1.8% per year, followed by Coffs Harbour (C), Eurobodalla (A) (on the south coast) and Port Stephens (in the Hunter region), all increasing by 1.5% per year.


Inland population change

At June 2006, 1.18 million people lived in inland NSW LGAs (LGAs not within Sydney SD nor on the coast), representing 17.3% of the total NSW population. The combined population of these LGAs increased by 22,200 people between June 2001 and June 2006, with an average annual growth rate of 0.4%.


The largest population increases in inland NSW during the five years to June 2006 were recorded in the regional centres of Maitland (C) (8,300 people), Queanbeyan (C) (4,100), Wagga Wagga (C) (3,200), and Albury (C) (3,000). Of the five fastest growing inland LGAs in NSW, three share borders with the ACT. Palerang (A) (3.5% per year), Yass Valley (A) (2.6% per year) and Queanbeyan (C) (2.3% per year) all increased rapidly over the five years to June 2006. Maitland (C) (in the Hunter region) recorded the second fastest population growth of inland LGAs, increasing at an average of 2.8% per year, while Murray (along the border of Victoria) recorded an average annual growth rate of 1.7%.


Many inland areas of NSW which have declined in population in the last five years have been affected by the recent drought. Moree Plains (A) recorded the largest population decline of any LGA in inland NSW, with a decrease of 1,700 people during the five years to June 2006. The five fastest population declines in NSW between June 2001 and June 2006 occurred in inland LGAs, with Bourke (A) (located in North Western SD) recording a decline of 4.0% per year, Central Darling (A) (Far West SD) declining by 3.9% per year and Walgett (A) and Warren (A) (both in North Western SD) both declining by 2.9% per year. Carrathool (A), located in the Murrumbidgee region, recorded an average annual decline of 2.6%.

LGAs with largest and fastest population decline, New South Wales

ERP AT 30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Decline

Campbelltown (C)
147 200
-3 000
-0.4
Fairfield (C)
186 400
-2 600
-0.3
Moree Plains (A)
14 600
-1 700
-2.1
Ku-ring-gai (A)
106 000
-1 600
-0.3
Canterbury (C)
136 000
-1 500
-0.2

Fastest Decline

Bourke (A)
3 200
-730
-4.0
Central Darling (A)
2 000
-440
-3.9
Walgett (A)
7 200
-1 100
-2.9
Warren (A)
2 900
-450
-2.9
Carrathool (A)
2 900
-410
-2.6

(a) Average annual growth rate.


CENTRE OF POPULATION FOR NEW SOUTH WALES

At June 2006 the centre of population for NSW was in the LGA of Hawkesbury (C) in the outer west of the Sydney SD. Between June 2001 and June 2006 the centre moved approximately 1.7 kilometres eastward, consistent with the previous five years, when the centre moved around 1.4 kilometres east, reflecting the continued growth in LGAs along the coast of NSW.


The centre of population of the Sydney SD at June 2006 was located in the suburb of Ermington, just north of the Parramatta River.


VICTORIA

STATE SUMMARY

The estimated resident population of Victoria at June 2006 was 5.13 million, an increase of 323,600 people since June 2001. The average annual growth rate was 1.3% compared with 1.1% in the five years to June 2001.


GROWTH IN MELBOURNE

At June 2006 there were an estimated 3.74 million people resident in Melbourne SD, representing an increase of 272,700 people between June 2001 and June 2006. Growth occurred at a higher average annual rate (1.5%) over this period than between June 1996 and June 2001 (1.1%).


Melbourne SD accounted for 73% of Victoria's population at June 2006, compared with 72% at June 2001. Population growth in Melbourne SD between June 2001 and June 2006 equated to 84% of Victoria's total population growth.


Growth in the inner city

Inner-city development was a strong driver of population growth over the five years to June 2006, with Melbourne (C) LGA experiencing the second fastest growth of Victorian LGAs. The Melbourne (C) LGA includes Melbourne's central business district, Docklands, Southbank and inner suburbs such as Carlton, North Melbourne and East Melbourne. Growth accelerated from an average annual rate of 5.0% in the five years to June 2001 to 8.6% in the five years to June 2006, bringing the population to 76,700 people.


The population of the SLA of Melbourne (C) - Southbank-Docklands more than tripled in the five years to 2006, growing by 9,700 people at an average rate of 25.8% each year. The SLA of Melbourne (C) - Inner, covering Melbourne's central business district, also grew rapidly, increasing in population by 6,200 people at an average annual rate of 14.3%. As these two SLAs experienced similarly high growth rates over the previous five-year period this reflects the continued growth of inner city apartment living.


Melbourne (C) - Remainder, the third of the SLAs within Melbourne (C), also experienced rapid growth between June 2001 and June 2006, increasing by 10,100 people at an average annual rate of 4.6%.


Growth in the outer suburbs

Other LGAs in Victoria to experience considerable growth from June 2001 to June 2006 were in the outer suburban areas of Melbourne. This trend began in the early 1990s and has continued through to 2006 with a number of residential housing estates and developments on the urban fringes.


Melton (S), located on the western fringe of the Melbourne SD, was the fastest growing LGA in Victoria between June 2001 and June 2006 with an average annual increase of 8.9%. This represented an increase of 28,100 people for the five years to 2006, the third largest increase among Victorian LGAs.


Wyndham (C), located on the outer south-western fringe of the Melbourne metropolitan area grew by 28,900 people between June 2001 and June 2006 at an average annual rate of 5.9%. Wyndham (C) - South, including suburbs such as Sanctuary Lakes and Point Cook, was the fastest growing SLA in Victoria between June 2001 and June 2006, increasing by 12,800 people at an average annual rate of 34.1%.


Casey (C), located on the outer south-eastern fringe of the Melbourne metropolitan area, experienced the largest growth of Victorian LGAs for both the 1996-2001 and 2001-2006 periods (32,600 and 40,700 respectively). The annual growth rate in Casey (C) increased slightly from 4.0% between June 1996 and June 2001 to 4.1% between June 2001 and June 2006.

LGAs with largest and fastest population growth, Victoria

ERP AT 30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Growth

Casey (C)
222 200
40 700
4.1
Wyndham (C)
116 000
28 900
5.9
Melton (S)
80 900
28 100
8.9
Melbourne (C)
76 700
26 000
8.6
Hume (C)
153 700
17 700
2.5

Fastest Growth

Melton (S)
80 900
28 100
8.9
Melbourne (C)
76 700
26 000
8.6
Wyndham (C)
116 000
28 900
5.9
Cardinia (S)
58 600
11 500
4.5
Casey (C)
222 200
40 700
4.1

(a) Average annual growth rate.


GROWTH IN REGIONAL VICTORIA

The population of regional Victoria (Victoria excluding the Melbourne SD) increased by 50,800 during the five years to June 2006, to 1.4 million people. The average annual rate of population growth of 0.8% for the period was similar to the average rate of 0.9% experienced between June 1996 and June 2001.


Consistent with the previous five years, all SDs in Victoria experienced growth between June 2001 and June 2006, with the exception of Wimmera SD. Barwon SD, including Greater Geelong (C) and Surf Coast (C), grew by 1.2% per year between June 2001 and June 2006 while Loddon SD, including Greater Bendigo (C), grew by 1.0% per year on average and Central Highlands, including Ballarat (C), grew by an average of 0.8% per year during the same period.


Growth on the fringes of Melbourne and Geelong

The fastest growing LGA in regional Victoria between June 2001 and June 2006 was Golden Plains (S) located to the west of Greater Geelong (C) and including the towns of Bannockburn and Meredith. Golden Plains (S) grew on average by 2.5% each year in the five years to June 2006, increasing by 2,000 people over this period to 17,100 people. Within Golden Plains (S), more than 80% of the growth between June 2001 and June 2006 occurred within the SLA of Golden Plains (S) - South East, growing on average by 3.8% per year and increasing by 1,600 people.


The second fastest growing LGA in regional Victoria between June 2001 and June 2006 was Mitchell (S), on the northern border of Melbourne SD. Mitchell (S) includes the towns of Wallan, Wandong and Kilmore. Mitchell (S) gained 3,600 people over this period at an average annual growth rate of 2.4%. The growth was concentrated within the SLA of Mitchell (S) - South, which gained 4,100 people at an average annual rate of 4.4%. Mitchell (S) - North, the other SLA within Mitchell (S), experienced a population decline of 400 people.


GROWTH ALONG THE COAST

Growth continued along Victoria's coast in the period between June 2001 and June 2006, but at a slower rate than between June 1996 and June 2001. Surf Coast (S), including Torquay and the Great Ocean Road, was one of the fastest growing LGAs in regional Victoria, increasing at an average annual rate of 1.8% in the five years to June 2006, compared to 3.2% per year during the previous five years.


Bass Coast (S), including Phillip Island, increased by 1,900 people between June 2001 and June 2006 at a lower average annual growth rate of 1.4% compared with 3.5% over the previous five years.


GROWTH IN REGIONAL CENTRES

The population of Victoria's regional centres continued to grow over the five years to June 2006. The largest growth occurred in Greater Geelong (C) which increased by 11,500 people at an average annual rate of 1.2% per year, slightly higher than the average growth rate over the five years to June 2001.


Greater Bendigo (C) was the fastest growing Victorian regional centre between June 2001 and June 2006, increasing by 6,300 people at an average rate of 1.4% per year (the same rate as between June 1996 and June 2001). Ballarat (C) also increased by the same average annual rate of 1.1% during both five-year periods.


Warrnambool (C) and Wodonga (RC) both had an average annual growth rate of 1.2% in the five years to June 2006.


Latrobe (C), which includes Traralgon, Morwell and Moe, experienced an average annual growth rate of 0.4% between June 2001 and June 2006 after the population declined between June 1996 and June 2001.


POPULATION DECLINE

A number of areas across Victoria experienced population decline in the five years to June 2006, the majority of which were in the Wimmera region of western Victoria and surrounding areas. The populations of Yarriambiack (S) and Loddon (S) declined at an average annual rate of 1.4% and 1.2% respectively, while Northern Grampians (S), West Wimmera (S) and Hindmarsh (S) each declined by 1.1% per year over the same period.


All LGAs that experienced population decline were located in regional Victoria while all LGAs within the Melbourne SD experienced population growth.

LGAs with largest and fastest population decline, Victoria

ERP AT
30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Decline

Northern Grampians (S)
12 300
-730
-1.1
Yarriambiack (S)
7 700
-570
-1.4
Loddon (S)
8 100
-510
-1.2
Gannawarra (S)
11 700
-390
-0.7
Corangamite (S)
17 200
-390
-0.4

Fastest Decline

Yarriambiack (S)
7 700
-570
-1.4
Loddon (S)
8 100
-510
-1.2
Northern Grampians (S)
12 300
-730
-1.1
West Wimmera (S)
4 600
-270
-1.1
Hindmarsh (S)
6 200
-360
-1.1

(a) Average annual growth rate.


CENTRE OF POPULATION FOR VICTORIA

Victoria's centre of population at June 2006 was located within the SLA of Moreland (C) - North, reflecting the high proportion of the Victorian population living in Melbourne. The centre of population moved approximately 1 kilometre south over the five years to June 2006. In the previous five years the centre of the state's population moved less than half a kilometre to the south-east.


At June 2006, the centre of population of the Melbourne SD was in the suburb of Glen Iris, just east of the Monash Freeway.



QUEENSLAND

STATE SUMMARY

The estimated resident population of Queensland at June 2006 was 4.09 million, an increase of 462,600 people since June 2001. Queensland's average annual growth rate was 2.4% per year for the period June 2001 to June 2006, making Queensland the fastest growing of all the states and territories. This was up from 1.7% average annual growth recorded for the preceding five-year period when Queensland was the second fastest growing state or territory, slightly behind the Northern Territory.


THE SOUTH-EAST - OVERVIEW

The south-east corner of Queensland (the Brisbane, Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast and West Moreton SDs) experienced an increase of 330,600 people between June 2001 and June 2006, accounting for 72% of Queensland's growth for the period. This was a larger increase than that of the five-year period to June 2001, which saw an increase in population of 236,400 people.


Reflecting this growth, the proportion of the Queensland population living in the south-east region has continued to increase steadily, from 64% in June 1996 to 65% in June 2001, and then to 66% in June 2006.


During the five years to June 2006, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast SDs continued to grow strongly, increasing by 85,500 people (at an average rate of 3.7% per year) and 48,000 people (3.6% per year) respectively. These rates surpassed the growth recorded in the previous five-year period, when the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast SDs increased at an average rate of 3.5% and 3.3% per year respectively. The Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast growth rates for the five years to June 2006 were the highest of all SDs in Australia.


The population of Brisbane SD increased by 191,300 people over the five years to June 2006, at an average rate of 2.2% per year. This average annual growth rate was greater than that of the previous five-year period, which was 1.7%. An estimated 1.82 million people lived in Brisbane SD at June 2006, representing 44.5% of Queensland's population, similar to the proportion at June 2001 (44.9%).


Population increases in south-east Queensland - in detail

All of the LGAs within south-east Queensland experienced population growth. The two most populous LGAs in Queensland, Brisbane (C) and Gold Coast (C), experienced the largest population increases in Queensland and Australia from June 1996 to June 2001, and June 2001 to June 2006. During the five years to June 2006 the population of Brisbane (C) increased by 95,500 people (at an average rate of 2.0% per year) while Gold Coast (C) increased by 83,700 people (or 3.7% per year) to surpass the population milestone of half a million people.


People moving into new and growing housing estates, particularly in the south, accounted for the largest increases within the Brisbane (C) LGA. The population of the southern SLA of Parkinson-Drewvale nearly doubled during the five years to June 2006, from 6,300 to 12,200 (an overall increase of 5,900 people at an average rate of 14.1% per year). The nearby SLA of Doolandella-Forest Lake also experienced large growth (up 3,800 people). Other areas to record large population increases were Wakerley in the east (up 2,400 people), Kuraby in the south (up 2,200 people) and the south-western SLAs of Seventeen Mile Rocks and Ellen Grove, which both increased by 2,000 people.


The construction and occupancy of new apartment developments resulted in high levels of growth in a number of inner Brisbane SLAs, five of which experienced growth of 2,000 people or more. These included City - Remainder (up 2,800 in the five years to 2006, at an average growth rate of 20.3% per year), Fortitude Valley (up 2,500 people, or 12.5% per year), Newstead and Toowong, which both increased by 2,300 people (12.4% and 3.2% per year, respectively) and Spring Hill, with a population increase of 2,000 (or 9.4% per year). Other central Brisbane SLAs to experience population increases of over 1,000 people since June 2001 were City - Inner, Kangaroo Point, South Brisbane and New Farm.


Of the remaining LGAs in the Brisbane SD, three experienced an increase of greater than 15,000 people. Pine Rivers (S) and Caboolture (S) recorded population increases of 22,600 and 21,000 respectively (representing 3.4% growth per year each), while Ipswich (C) grew by 17,000 (or 2.5% per year). This reflects the new and expanding housing estates in these areas.


Within Gold Coast (C) the largest population increases for the period from June 2001 to June 2006 were also recorded in SLAs with new and expanding housing estates. Since June 2001, the populations of both Kingsholme-Upper Coomera in the north and nearby Pacific Pines-Gaven more than doubled. Kingsholme-Upper Coomera increased by 7,900 people, representing an average annual growth rate of 15.3%. Pacific Pines-Gaven grew by 6,600 people, with an average annual growth rate (17.7%) the highest of all SLAs in the Gold Coast (C) LGA.


The coastal LGAs of Maroochy (S) and Caloundra (C) in Sunshine Coast SD also recorded substantial growth from June 2001 to June 2006. Maroochy (S) increased by 25,500 people (at an average rate of 3.7% per year) while Caloundra (C) increased by 17,000 (4.1% per year).


The largest population increase in the West Moreton SD occurred in the LGA of Laidley (S), which grew by 2,200 people during the five years to June 2006, or 3.2% per year.


POPULATION GROWTH IN THE REMAINDER OF QUEENSLAND

Six of the nine SDs outside south-east Queensland recorded population growth at rates higher than in the previous five-year period. Continuing the trend from 1996 to 2001, Wide Bay-Burnett and Far North SDs had the largest growth of all SDs in the remainder of Queensland, recording respective increases of 32,800 people (2.6% per year) and 23,400 people (2.0% per year). Mackay SD also recorded strong growth of 22,300 people during the five years to June 2006, at an average annual growth rate of 3.1%, which was the fastest annual average growth rate among the Queensland SDs outside of south-east Queensland.


Of the growth that occurred outside south-east Queensland, nearly half was accounted for by five coastal LGAs. Cairns (C) in Far North SD increased by 18,900 people (3.0% on average per year) and Mackay (C) increased by 14,300 people (3.5% per year). Hervey Bay (C) recorded a growth of 11,800 people (4.9% per year), while the adjacent cities of Thuringowa (C) and Townsville (C) in Northern SD increased by 10,200 and 10,000 people, respectively.


Employment in the mining industry contributed to Weipa (T) in Far North SD experiencing the fastest population growth of all LGAs in Queensland over the five years to June 2006. Weipa's population increased at an average rate of 6.9% per year in that period (up 860 people), compared with a population decline during the previous five-year period.

LGAs with largest and fastest population growth, Queensland

ERP AT 30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Growth

Brisbane (C)
992 200
95 500
2.0
Gold Coast (C)
507 400
83 700
3.7
Maroochy (S)
152 700
25 500
3.7
Pine Rivers (S)
144 900
22 600
3.4
Caboolture (S)
135 400
21 000
3.4

Fastest Growth(b)

Weipa (T)
3 000
860
6.9
Crow's Nest (S)
13 300
3 100
5.3
Nebo (S)
2 700
590
5.1
Hervey Bay (C)
55 100
11 800
4.9
Caloundra (C)
93 200
17 000
4.1

(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) Excludes LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2001.


DECLINING POPULATIONS

In the five years to June 2006, the three SDs of North West, Central West and South West each experienced population declines. During the previous five years only two SDs declined in population, North West and Central West (down 90 and 70 people respectively). From June 2001 to June 2006, North West SD's population decreased by 1,100 people, Central West SD by 930 people and South West SD by 600 people. During this period all three SDs experienced severe drought, which may have contributed to the population loss.


The Queensland LGA that recorded the largest decrease in population in the five years to June 2006 was Balonne (S) in the South West SD, down 640 people, or 2.4% per year on average. This decrease was smaller than the decrease recorded by each of the five largest declining LGAs between June 1996 and June 2001 (which declined by between 930 and 1,500 people). Of the LGAs with a population greater than 2,000 people in June 2001, the fastest average decline per year occurred in Cloncurry (S) (2.6%) in the North West SD.

LGAs with largest and fastest population decline, Queensland

ERP AT
30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Decline

Balonne (S)
4 900
-640
-2.4
Cardwell (S)
10 100
-580
-1.1
Burdekin (S)
18 000
-470
-0.5
Cloncurry (S)
3 400
-470
-2.6
Charters Towers (C)
8 500
-280
-0.7

Fastest Decline(b)

Cloncurry (S)
3 400
-470
-2.6
Balonne (S)
4 900
-640
-2.4
Carpentaria (S)
2 100
-210
-1.9
Flinders (S)
1 900
-180
-1.8
Paroo (S)
2 100
-160
-1.5

(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) Excludes LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2001.


CENTRE OF POPULATION FOR QUEENSLAND

The centre of population of Queensland moved approximately 6 kilometres south-eastward since June 2001, and at June 2006 was located in Gayndah (S), which is around 300 kilometres north of Brisbane. The move towards the south-east is consistent with the previous five years, when the centre of Queensland's population moved approximately 10 kilometres south-east, reflecting the population growth in the cities of Brisbane and the Gold Coast.


The centre of population of Brisbane SD at June 2006 was just south of the central business district, in the proximity of the City Botanic Gardens.



SOUTH AUSTRALIA

STATE SUMMARY

The estimated resident population of South Australia (SA) at June 2006 was 1.57 million people, an increase of 56,500 since June 2001. The average annual growth rate during this period was 0.7%, which was higher than the average annual growth between June 1996 and June 2001 (0.5%).

POPULATION GROWTH IN ADELAIDE

Adelaide SD

The population of Adelaide SD at June 2006 was 1.15 million people. This was an increase of 38,100 people since June 2001. While Adelaide SD continued to account for 73% of the South Australian population at June 2006 (as it did in June 1996 and June 2001), the percentage of SA's population growth attributable to Adelaide SD was 68% in the five years to June 2006, compared with 79% between June 1996 and June 2001.


The three LGAs with the largest population growth in SA between June 2001 and June 2006 were all in the Adelaide SD. Salisbury (C) experienced the largest growth, with an increase of 7,600 people, followed by Port Adelaide Enfield (C) and Adelaide (C) (both up 4,400 people). Adelaide (C) was also the fastest growing LGA in SA, with an average annual growth rate of 5.9% over the five years to June 2006. The only LGA within the Adelaide SD to experience population decline during that period was Tea Tree Gully (C), which lost 250 people.


Outer Adelaide SD

From June 2001 to June 2006, Outer Adelaide SD recorded the most rapid growth of all South Australian SDs, increasing by 2.5% per year on average, or 14,900 people over the five-year period.


Outer Adelaide SD contained the three fastest growing SSDs in South Australia: the Fleurieu SSD, in which the population increased at an average annual rate of 3.0%; Barossa SSD (2.6%); and Mount Lofty Ranges (2.2%).


The fastest growing LGA in Outer Adelaide SD during the five years to June 2006, was Light (RegC) (which incorporates part of the Barossa Valley), recording an average annual growth rate of 4.0%, with a total increase of 2,300 people. The second fastest growing LGA was Alexandrina (DC) (which includes the south coast and hills of the Fleurieu Peninsula), with an average annual growth rate of 3.4% (or 3,300 people). Mount Barker (DC), situated in the Mt Lofty Ranges just east of Adelaide, experienced the largest growth of LGAs in the Outer Adelaide SD from June 2001 to June 2006, increasing by 3,800 people, and also recorded the third fastest growth rate of LGAs in Outer Adelaide (3.0% per annum).

LGAs with largest and fastest population growth, South Australia

ERP AT 30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Growth

Salisbury (C)
122 200
7 600
1.3
Adelaide (C)
17 700
4 400
5.9
Port Adelaide Enfield (C)
106 400
4 400
0.8
Mount Barker (DC)
27 600
3 800
3.0
Onkaparinga (C)
154 400
3 400
0.4

Fastest Growth

Adelaide (C)
17 700
4 400
5.9
Light (RegC)
12 800
2 300
4.0
Alexandrina (DC)
21 500
3 300
3.4
Roxby Downs (M)
4 300
660
3.4
Mount Barker (DC)
27 600
3 800
3.0

(a) Average annual growth rate.


POPULATION CHANGE IN THE REMAINDER OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Population Growth

Population growth for LGAs in the remainder of South Australia between June 2001 and June 2006 was generally smaller than the growth experienced in Adelaide and Outer Adelaide SDs. The regional centre of Murray Bridge (RC), which is about 80 km south-east of Adelaide, recorded the largest population increase of all LGAs outside Adelaide and Outer Adelaide SDs, growing by 1,300 people during the five years to June 2006. Other South Australian LGAs to experience large population growth were Mount Gambier (C), in the state's south-east (990 people), Copper Coast (DC) in the north of Yorke Peninsula (860) and the mining area of Roxby Downs (M) (660). Roxby Downs (M) was also the fastest growing LGA outside the Adelaide and Outer Adelaide SDs during the five years to June 2006, with an average annual population growth of 3.4%.


Population Decline

The only South Australian SD to experience population decline in the five years to June 2006 was Northern SD, although population decline slowed from an average annual rate of 0.8% between June 1996 and June 2001, to 0.4% in the more recent five-year period. Of the LGAs to experience population decline between June 2001 and June 2006, the majority were located in the remainder of the state (outside of Adelaide SD or Outer Adelaide SD).


The two LGAs which had the largest and fastest population declines in South Australia in the five years to June 2006 were Anangu Pitjantjatjara (AC) and Coober Pedy (DC) in the far north of the state, which lost 470 and 430 people respectively, both at an average annual rate of 3.8%.

LGAs with largest and fastest population decline, South Australia

ERP AT
30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Decline

Anangu Pitjantjatjara (AC)
2 200
-470
-3.8
Coober Pedy (DC)
2 000
-430
-3.8
Tea Tree Gully (C)
99 500
-250
-
Loxton Waikerie (DC)
12 100
-150
-0.2
Le Hunte (DC)
1 400
-90
-1.2

Fastest Decline(b)

Coober Pedy (DC)
2 000
-430
-3.8
Anangu Pitjantjatjara (AC)
2 200
-470
-3.8
Southern Mallee (DC)
2 200
-60
-0.5
Peterborough (DC)
2 000
-50
-0.5
Mount Remarkable (DC)
2 900
-70
-0.5

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) Excludes LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2001.

CENTRE OF POPULATION FOR SOUTH AUSTRALIA

At June 2006, South Australia's centre of population was in the SLA of Port Adelaide Enfield (C) - East. The centre of the state's population moved 1.5 kilometres during the five years to June 2006, from Salisbury (C) to Port Adelaide Enfield (C). The move towards the south-east reflects the population growth in Adelaide (C) and south-east areas of Outer Adelaide SD, as well as population decline in the Northern SD.


The centre of population of the Adelaide SD at June 2006 was in the parklands, just east of the Adelaide Oval.




WESTERN AUSTRALIA

STATE SUMMARY

The estimated resident population of Western Australia (WA) was 2.06 million at June 2006, an increase of 157,900 people since June 2001. Between June 2001 and June 2006, Western Australia's population grew at an average annual rate of 1.6%, a slightly higher rate than that recorded for the period from June 1996 to June 2001 (1.5%).


The Perth SD (up 126,500 people) experienced the largest growth of all Western Australian SDs in the five years to June 2006, followed by the South West SD (up 23,700 people) while the Midlands SD and Upper Great Southern SD experienced small decreases in population.


PERTH SD

The population of Perth SD at June 2006 was 1.52 million people and accounted for 74% of the Western Australian population. All LGAs in the Perth SD grew in population between June 2001 and June 2006.


The strong growth in metropolitan fringe areas of the Perth SD between June 1996 and June 2001 continued in the five years to June 2006. Wanneroo (C) to the north of Perth recorded the largest increase in WA and the fifth largest increase of all LGAs in Australia (up 31,400 people). The largely coastal LGA of Rockingham (C) to the south of Perth, grew by 13,500 people. The inland LGAs of Gosnells (C) in the south-east and Swan (C) in the east metropolitan parts of Perth also recorded large population increases (12,200 people each).


The inner city area of Perth (C) was the fastest growing LGA in Australia between June 2001 and June 2006, increasing from 7,800 to 12,600 people at an average annual growth rate of 10.0%. The growth in Perth (C) has been largely driven by the substantial rise in the number of high-density dwellings built during the period.

LGAs with largest and fastest population growth, Western Australia

ERP AT 30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Growth

Wanneroo (C)
115 500
31 400
6.5
Rockingham (C)
87 500
13 500
3.4
Gosnells (C)
95 700
12 200
2.8
Swan (C)
97 300
12 200
2.7
Stirling (C)
186 500
9 900
1.1

Fastest Growth(b)

Perth (C)
12 500
4 700
10.0
Capel (S)
10 600
3 500
8.4
Wanneroo (C)
115 500
31 400
6.5
East Pilbara (S)
7 200
1 500
4.9
Chittering (S)
3 700
750
4.6

(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) Excludes LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2001.


GROWTH IN REGIONAL WESTERN AUSTRALIA

South West SD

People continue to be attracted to the South West SD due to factors such as proximity to Perth and Bunbury, housing affordability and the popularity of living near the coast. While the South West SD grew at a slower rate between June 2001 and June 2006 (2.3%) compared with the previous five-year period (3.0%), it was the second fastest growing SD in WA. Over this period the population of the South West SD increased from 194,100 to 217,800 people. Most LGAs (81%) in the South West SD experienced population increases, with the strongest growth occurring in coastal areas. Mandurah (C), the largest population centre in the South West (58,500 people at June 2006) recorded the largest increase in the five years to June 2006 (9,600 people). The LGAs of Capel (S) (8.4% average growth per year) and Dardanup (S) (3.8%), adjacent to the City of Bunbury (C), experienced the fastest growth in the South West SD.


Pilbara SD

The strong growth in the mining industry saw the Pilbara SD reverse the population decline experienced between June 1996 and June 2001 (at an average annual rate of 0.5%) to become the fastest growing SD in WA between June 2001 and June 2006 (2.4% per year). The shire of Roebourne (S) recorded the largest growth (up 2,600 people) and the shire of East Pilbara (S), with an average annual growth rate of 4.9%, recorded the fastest growth in the Pilbara SD.


DECLINES IN REGIONAL WESTERN AUSTRALIA

There were 59 LGAs (42%) in WA which experienced population decline in the five years to June 2006. The LGA with the largest population loss was Derby-West Kimberley (S) which fell by 800 people. This decline was, in part, caused by the closure of the Curtin Detention Centre late in 2002 which resulted in the relocation of 800 people. Another LGA in the Kimberley SD, Halls Creek (S), recorded a loss of 200 people.


Two-thirds of the LGAs in the largely agricultural Midlands SD recorded a population loss between June 2001 and June 2006. Dalwallinu (S) (down 440 people) and Merredin (S) (down 330 people) recorded the largest decreases over the period. A significant exception was Chittering (S), located on the outskirts of Perth SD, which recorded one of the fastest average annual growth rates in WA (4.6%).


Over three-quarters of the LGAs in the Central SD experienced population decline between June 2001 and June 2006. The coastal shire of Carnarvon (S) (down 560 people) recorded the largest population loss in the Central SD and the second largest decline in the state. Other areas to record substantial population decline were the centrally located shires of Mount Magnet (S) and Meekatharra (S). The shire of Greenough (S) near Geraldton was a major exception in this region, increasing by 2,200 people with an average annual growth rate of 3.2% in the five years to June 2006.

LGAs with largest and fastest population decline, Western Australia

ERP AT
30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Decline

Derby-West Kimberley (S)
7 500
-780
-1.9
Carnarvon (S)
6 200
-560
-1.7
Manjimup (S)
9 800
-540
-1.1
Leonora (S)
1 500
-470
-5.2
Dalwallinu (S)
1 400
-440
-5.2

Fastest Decline(b)

Derby-West Kimberley (S)
7 500
-780
-1.9
Merredin (S)
3 400
-330
-1.8
Carnarvon (S)
6 200
-560
-1.7
Exmouth (S)
2 200
-130
-1.2
Narrogin (T)
4 500
-250
-1.1

(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) Excludes LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2001.


CENTRE OF POPULATION FOR WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Western Australia's centre of population at June 2006 was located in the SLA of Toodyay (S), approximately 60 kilometres north-east of Perth. The centre of population moved approximately five kilometres south-westward between June 2001 and June 2006, in line with the previous five-year period, when the centre of population moved 1.7 kilometres south-westward, reflecting the large growth occurring in Perth SD and South West SD.


The centre of population of the Perth SD at June 2006 was located in the Swan River, directly south of the Perth central business district.



TASMANIA

STATE SUMMARY

The estimated resident population of Tasmania at June 2006 was 489,900 people. Between June 2001 and June 2006 Tasmania's population increased by 18,100 people, at an average rate of 0.8% per year. This compares with the period between June 1996 and June 2001 when the population declined by 2,600 people, albeit at a low average annual rate of 0.1%.


REGIONAL CHANGES

In the five years to June 2006, all four of Tasmania's SDs increased in population. Greater Hobart gained 8,300 people, Northern gained 5,600, Mersey-Lyell gained 2,700 and Southern gained 1,500. In contrast, in the five years to June 2001, only the Greater Hobart and Southern SDs increased in population (1,600 and 100 people respectively). Northern lost 930 people and Mersey-Lyell lost 3,400 in the same period.


Three of the four SDs increased their share of the Tasmanian population in 2006 compared to 2001, while Mersey-Lyell experienced a slight decrease in its share. At June 2006, Greater Hobart comprised 42% of the population, Northern comprised 28%, Mersey-Lyell comprised 22%, and Southern comprised 7% of the population.


At the SSD level only Lyell, a mining region, experienced a population loss over the five years to June 2006, losing 350 people.


LARGEST AND FASTEST POPULATION GROWTH IN LGAS

Of Tasmania's 29 LGAs, 24 increased in population in the five years to June 2006. Kingborough (M), located within commuting distance of the capital city, experienced the largest increase in population (2,300), followed by Launceston (C) and Hobart (C). Fastest growth occurred in Brighton (M) and Sorell (M) (2.1% and 2.0% average annual growth respectively), which are also located within commuting distance of the capital.

LGAs with largest and fastest population growth, Tasmania

ERP AT
30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Growth

Kingborough (M)
31 700
2 300
1.5
Launceston (C)
64 600
2 300
0.7
Hobart (C)
49 600
2 100
0.9
Brighton (M)
14 300
1 400
2.1
West Tamar (M)
21 500
1 300
1.2

Fastest Growth

Brighton (M)
14 300
1 400
2.1
Sorell (M)
12 100
1 100
2.0
Glamorgan/Spring Bay (M)
4 300
340
1.6
Kentish (M)
6 000
470
1.6
Kingborough (M)
31 700
2 300
1.5

(a) Average annual growth rate.


POPULATION DECLINE IN LGAS

Of the LGAs experiencing no growth in population in the five years to June 2006, the largest declines occurred in the mining area of West Coast (M) (350 people) and Dorset (M) (90), which is a north-east coastal farming area. Populations remained relatively steady in Central Highlands (M), Flinders (M) and King Island (M).


West Coast (M) also experienced the fastest population decline in the five years to June 2006, followed by Dorset (M), with average annual rates of decline of 1.3% and 0.2% respectively. However, the rate of decline for West Coast (M) had slowed compared with the period June 1996 to June 2001 when the average annual population decline was 2.8%.

LGAs with largest and fastest population decline, Tasmania

ERP AT
30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
LGA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Decline

West Coast (M)
5 200
-350
-1.3
Dorset (M)
7 300
-90
-0.2

Fastest Decline(b)

West Coast (M)
5 200
-350
-1.3
Dorset (M)
7 300
-90
-0.2

(a) Average annual growth rate.
(b) Excludes LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2001.


POPULATION INCREASE IN TASMANIAN CITIES

All of Tasmania's six city LGAs increased in population over the five years to June 2006, with Launceston (C) growing the most (2,300 people), followed by Hobart (C) (2,100) and Clarence (C) (1,200). By comparison, the only Tasmanian cities to increase in population in the June 1996 to June 2001 period were Hobart (C) (550 people) and Clarence (C) (40). The fastest growing cities over the June 2001 to June 2006 period were Hobart (C), with a 0.9% average annual increase, Burnie (C) (0.8%) and Launceston (C) (0.7%). Glenorchy (C) had the smallest population increase (180 people) and slowest population growth (0.1% average annual increase) over the same period.


CENTRE OF POPULATION FOR TASMANIA

Tasmania's centre of population at June 2006 was in the SLA of Central Highlands (M) and had moved approximately 0.5 kilometres south-eastward since June 2001, compared with a move of 1.5 kilometres towards the south-east in the five years to June 2001.


The centre of population of the Greater Hobart SD at June 2006 was in the proximity of the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens.


NORTHERN TERRITORY

NORTHERN TERRITORY SUMMARY

The estimated resident population of the Northern Territory (NT) at June 2006 was 210,700 people, an increase of 12,900 since June 2001. The average annual growth rate over this period was 1.3%, compared to 1.7% in the five years ending June 2001.


DARWIN SD

Between June 2001 and June 2006 the population of the Darwin SD grew by 7,500 people to 114,400. Darwin SD's average annual growth rate of 1.4% over this period was slightly higher than that recorded for the remainder of the NT (1.2%). At June 2006, Darwin SD accounted for 54.3% of the NT's total population.


All three SSDs within the Darwin SD experienced population growth between June 2001 and June 2006. Palmerston-East Arm grew by an average of 2.8% per year, Litchfield Shire by 1.2% per year and Darwin City SSD by 0.9% per year.


Population change in Darwin City SSD

The population of Darwin City SSD at June 2006 was 71,900 people, an increase of 3,200 people since June 2001. The highest average annual growth rates during this period were recorded in the SLAs of Stuart Park and City - Inner (both 5.0%), with Bayview-Woolner also experiencing large growth (up 1,100 people). Growth in these areas was mainly due to continued residential development.


Despite the overall increase in the Darwin City SSD population since 2001, decreases occurred in a number of SLAs. In general, these declines were in the older, more established SLAs of the northern suburbs, such as Leanyer, Malak and Marrara. The SLA of City - Remainder (which includes both RAAF Base Darwin and Defence Establishment Berrimah) recorded the largest decline in population of SLAs in the NT, declining by 470 people between June 2001 and June 2006.


Large population growth in Palmerston-East Arm SSD

Palmerston-East Arm SSD experienced the largest growth in population of SSDs in the NT between June 2001 and June 2006, increasing by 3,300 people at an average growth rate of 2.8% per year to reach 25,900 people at June 2006. This increase accounted for 25.8% of the NT's population growth between June 2001 and June 2006, which, although not as high as the percentage of NT's growth between June 1996 and June 2001 (57.9%), may still be attributed to the fact that Palmerston-East Arm SSD is an expanding residential area, which provides a range of housing options attractive to a broad range of socioeconomic groups.


Within the Palmerston-East Arm SSD, the largest growth occurred in the SLAs of Palmerston (C) Bal (1,400 people) and Gunn-Palmerston City (1,300 people), while the longer-established SLAs in Palmerston experienced much smaller growth or population decline, following previous large growth. For example, the population of Driver increased by 400 people between June 1996 and June 2001, but decreased by 180 in the five years ending June 2006.


Continued growth in Litchfield Shire SSD

The population of Litchfield Shire SSD continued to grow in the five years to June 2006 (1.2% per year), although at a slower rate than the previous five-year period (2.8% per year). During the five years to June 2006, the vast majority of the population growth took place in the SLA of Litchfield (S) - Pt B (which includes Howard Springs and Humpty Doo), which increased by 1,200 people (1.6% per year on average).


POPULATION CHANGE IN OTHER MAJOR NT TOWNS

In contrast to the population declines recorded in the five years to June 2001, the populations of Tennant Creek (T) increased by 330 people, Jabiru (T) by 70 people and Katherine (T) by 60 people in the five years to June 2006.


Between June 1996 and June 2006 the population of Alice Springs (T) increased from 25,000 to 26,200, an average annual increase of 0.5%.

SLAs with largest population growth and decline, Northern Territory

ERP AT
30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
SLA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Growth

Palmerston (C) Bal
3 000
1 400
13.4
East Arnhem - Bal
7 700
1 300
3.8
Gunn-Palmerston City
2 500
1 300
14.7
Litchfield (S) - Pt B
15 200
1 200
1.6
Bayview-Woolner
1 900
1 100
20.9

Largest Decline

City - Remainder
2 500
-470
-3.4
Tanami
2 900
-340
-2.2
Gulf
730
-250
-5.7
Nyirranggulung Mardrulk Ngadberre (CGC)
1 100
-210
-3.4
Driver
2 900
-180
-1.2

(a) Average annual growth rate.


CENTRE OF POPULATION FOR NORTHERN TERRITORY

During the five years to June 2006, the Northern Territory's centre of population was in the SLA of Elsey, moving approximately 10 kilometres north since June 2001, continuing the trend of the previous five years when the centre of the population moved around 7 kilometres north. This movement reflects the population growth in the northern areas such as Darwin City SSD, Palmerston-East Arm SSD and East Arnhem SSD.

The centre of population of the Darwin SD at June 2006 was located in the suburb of Berrimah, south of the Stuart Highway.




AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY

AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY SUMMARY

The estimated resident population of the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) at June 2006 was 334,200 people, an increase of 14,900 people since June 2001. The ACT's average annual growth rate for the five years to June 2006 was 0.9%, which was higher than the corresponding growth rate of 0.7% for the five years to June 2001.

STATISTICAL SUBDIVISIONS

From June 2001 to June 2006, the majority (55%) of ACT's population growth occurred in the suburban fringe SSD of Gungahlin-Hall, which increased by 8,200 people (or by an average of 5.9% per year). However, growth in this region has slowed compared with the five years to June 2001 when the population grew by an average of 14.0% per year. Smaller growth was recorded in North Canberra (up 5,200 people since June 2001), Belconnen (up 1,600 people), South Canberra (1,300 people) and Woden Valley (760 people). The largest decline in population between June 2001 and June 2006 occurred in the SSD of Tuggeranong on Canberra's southern edge, which lost 1,200 people (or an average of 0.3% per year). Weston Creek-Stromlo recorded a smaller decline, losing 780 people.


POPULATION GROWTH

SLA growth in the ACT

High-density development in the new SLA of Gungahlin has led to an increase of 3,900 people in the five years since June 2001. Also partly due to development, the next largest population increase occurred in Dunlop, in the north-western fringe of the Belconnen SSD, which increased by 3,200 people. Amaroo, in the north of Gungahlin-Hall recorded the third largest increase (up 2,300 people since 2001). The inner northern SLA of Turner recorded the fourth largest growth (up 1,300 people), and the outer southern SLA of Banks the fifth largest (up 1,200).


The long-established SLA of Kambah, located on the southern fringes of Canberra, remains the ACT's most populous SLA with 16,100 people, although it has experienced a decline from June 2001 when it recorded a population of 17,100 people. Ngunnawal, located in the northern fringes of Canberra remains the second largest SLA, in terms of population, with 9,200 people, and Wanniassa the third largest with 8,200 people. Since 2001, Gordon has replaced Kaleen to become the fourth most populous SLA (8,100 people) and Kaleen is now the fifth (7,900).


Growth in the surrounding region

Due partly to their proximity to Canberra, the NSW LGAs of Palerang (A), Yass Valley (A) and Queanbeyan (C) all experienced high growth in the five years to June 2001. Palerang (A) overtook Queanbeyan (C) to record the fastest growth of all inland NSW LGAs, with an average annual growth rate of 3.5% (or 2,000 people). Yass Valley (A) recorded the third fastest growth of all inland NSW LGAs, increasing by an average of 2.6% per year, and Queanbeyan (C) the fourth fastest, growing by an average of 2.3% per year.


SLA DECLINE

More than half of the SLAs in the ACT lost population over the five-year period to June 2006. The three SLAs in the ACT experiencing the largest decreases were all part of the Tuggeranong SSD. Kambah remained the SLA to record the largest decrease of 930 people, followed by Wanniassa with a decrease of 510 people and Chisholm, which decreased by 390 people.


The SLA of Duntroon changed from recording the second largest population decline in the five years to June 2001, to recording an increase of 460 people over the following five years.

SLAs with largest population growth and decline, Australian Capital Territory

ERP AT
30 JUN
Population Change
2006p
2001-2006p
SLA
no.
no.
%(a)

Largest Growth

Gungahlin
3 900
3 900
. .
Dunlop
6 000
3 200
17.0
Amaroo
5 700
2 300
11.2
Turner
3 100
1 300
11.0
Banks
5 000
1 200
5.9

Largest Decline

Kambah
16 100
-930
-1.1
Wanniassa
8 200
-510
-1.2
Chisholm
5 500
-390
-1.4
Evatt
5 700
-390
-1.3
Kaleen
7 900
-360
-0.9

. . not applicable
(a) Average annual growth rate.


CENTRE OF POPULATION FOR AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY

At June 2006 the ACT's centre of population was in the suburb of Yarralumla, south-east of the Royal Adelaide Golf Course, and had moved approximately 0.5 kilometres north since June 2001. This followed the trend of the previous five years, when the centre of population also moved around 0.5 kilometres north. This movement reflects the large growth occurring in the north, in particular Gungahlin-Hall SSD.


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