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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011-12 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/04/2013   
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MAIN FEATURES


Population change

State and territory highlights

Capital city growth

Outer suburban growth

Inner-city growth

Urban infill

Growth along the coast

Growth in inland areas

Population decline

Population change by Remoteness Areas

Population density

Centre of population


POPULATION CHANGE

Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) reached 22.7 million at 30 June 2012, increasing by 359,600 people or 1.6% since 30 June 2011.

All states and territories experienced population growth between 2011 and 2012, with the largest increases in Australia's three most populous states. Victoria had the greatest growth (up 89,000 people), followed by Queensland (86,000) and New South Wales (78,900). Western Australia was close behind, increasing by 78,000 people.

Western Australia had the fastest growth, increasing by 3.3% in the 12 months to 2012, followed by Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory (both 1.9%). Victoria grew by 1.6%, equal to Australia. The remaining states and territories all had growth below the Australian rate, with the Northern Territory at 1.5%, New South Wales at 1.1%, South Australia at 1.0% and Tasmania at just 0.2%.

Population growth between 2011 and 2012 was most prominent in outer suburbs, inner cities, urban infill areas and along the coast. Areas that have seen decline include well-established suburbs within capital cities, and inland rural areas as can be seen in the following map which shows the population change of Statistical Areas Level 2 (SA2s) over this period.

SA2 POPULATION CHANGE, Australia - June 2011 and June 2012
Diagram: SA2 POPULATION CHANGE, Australia—June 2011 and June 2012



STATE AND TERRITORY HIGHLIGHTS

New South Wales
  • Population growth in Greater Sydney accounted for 78% of the state's total growth in the year to June 2012.
  • Parklea - Kellyville Ridge was the largest and fastest-growing SA2 in New South Wales, up 2,300 people or 10%.


Victoria
  • Greater Melbourne had the largest growth of any capital city in Australia, with an increase of 77,200 people in the 12 months to June 2012.
  • Melbourne - West, with an increase of 22,700 persons, was the SA4 which contributed most to the growth of Greater Melbourne.


Queensland
  • In Greater Brisbane, the inland SA4 of Ipswich experienced both large growth (up 8,700 people) and fast growth (3.0%) in the year to June 2012.
  • Over the same period, the population in the remainder of Queensland increased by 42,700 people. The southern coastal SA4s of Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast accounted for 39% of this growth, while the central coastal SA4s of Townsville, Mackay and Fitzroy accounted for 35%.


South Australia
  • Davoren Park and neighbouring Munno Para West - Angle Vale in Greater Adelaide's north, recorded the largest population growth in South Australia in the 12 months to June 2012, up 710 and 660 people respectively.
  • Munno Para West - Angle Vale was the fastest-growing SA2 within the state, increasing by 8.3% to 8,600 people.


Western Australia
  • Greater Perth was the fastest-growing capital city in Australia, at 3.6%.
  • The fastest-growing SA2 in Western Australia in the year to June 2012 was Forrestdale - Harrisdale - Piara Waters in Greater Perth's south-east, increasing by 24% to reach 9,600 people.


Tasmania
  • Greater Hobart grew by 680 people between June 2011 and June 2012, while the remainder of Tasmania increased by 140 people.
  • The SA2s with the fastest growth were Latrobe (up 2.8%) in the state's north and Margate - Snug (2.7%) in Hobart's south.


Northern Territory
  • Rosebery - Bellamack and Lyons, both in Greater Darwin, were the fastest-growing SA2s in the Northern Territory in the 12 months to June 2012, up 9.6% and 6.3% repectively.
  • The SA2s with the largest growth were Rosebery - Bellamack (up 380 people) and Katherine (260).


Australian Capital Territory
  • The combined population of the Australian Capital Territory's northern SA3s increased by 7,500 people in the year to June 2012 while the southern SA3s decreased by 630.
  • The SA3 with the largest growth was Gungahlin, increasing by 5,100 people.


CAPITAL CITY GROWTH

At June 2012, more than 15.0 million people, close to two-thirds of Australia's population, resided in a capital city. The combined population of capital cities increased by 271,700 people in the year to 2012.

Greater Melbourne recorded the largest growth of all capital cities in 2011-12, increasing by 77,200 people, followed by Greater Perth (up 65,400 people) and Greater Sydney (61,300). Greater Melbourne grew by an average of nearly 1,500 people per week, while the population of Greater Perth increased by over 1,200 people per week.

The population of Australia's capital cities grew by 1.8% between 2011 and 2012, faster than the remainder of Australia (1.2%). Greater Perth had the fastest growth of all capital cities at 3.6%, ahead of Greater Darwin and Greater Brisbane (both 2.0%). The slowest growth was in Greater Hobart (0.3%).

OUTER SUBURBAN GROWTH

Many areas which experienced strong growth were located on the fringes of capital cities, where more land tends to be available for subdivision and housing development. The four SA2s with the largest growth in the country between 2011 and 2012 were all on the outskirts of Greater Melbourne. The population of South Morang increased by 5,900, followed by Point Cook (4,100), Tarneit (3,600) and Craigieburn - Mickleham (2,900).

In Western Australia, the SA2s of Baldivis, on the southern outskirts of Greater Perth, and Ellenbrook in the north-east, recorded the largest growth in the state in the 12 months to June 2012, increasing by 2,800 and 2,400 people respectively.

The SA2 in New South Wales with both the largest and fastest population increase in 2011-12 was Parklea - Kellyville Ridge, in the north-west growth corridor of Greater Sydney (up 2,300 people, or 10%). Cobbitty - Leppington, in the south-west growth corridor also grew rapidly (up 9.6%).

In Queensland, the largest growth between 2011 and 2012 occurred in the outer suburban SA2 of North Lakes - Mango Hill (up 2,000 people) in the north of Greater Brisbane. Forest Lake - Doolandella, south-west of Brisbane's central business district, also had large growth, increasing by 1,700 people.

Outer suburban areas in the smaller capital cities also experienced some of the strongest growth in their states or territories in 2011-12. The areas with the largest population increases in South Australia were the outer Adelaide SA2s of Davoren Park (up 710 people) and Munno Para West - Angle Vale (660). In the Australian Capital Territory, the neighbouring areas of Bonner and Forde, on the territory's northern fringe increased by 1,700 and 920 people respectively, while on the outskirts of Greater Darwin, Rosebery - Bellamack increased by 380 people. In Tasmania, the outer suburban Margate - Snug had the largest growth in the state, increasing by 190 people.

INNER-CITY GROWTH

The inner-city SA2s of Melbourne and Southbank had population increases among the largest in Australia between June 2011 and June 2012, increasing by 2,000 and 1,300 people respectively. Other inner-city areas to experience large growth included Perth City (up 1,100 people), Sydney - Haymarket - The Rocks (900) and nearby Waterloo - Beaconsfield (800), North Melbourne (710) and Adelaide (600).

Southbank, which adjoins Melbourne's central business district, was the fastest-growing of all inner-city SA2s, increasing by 11% to 13,600 people in the year to June 2012. Civic (up 10% to 3,400 people) in Canberra, and Melbourne (up 9.3% to 23,900) also had rapid growth.

URBAN INFILL

Urban infill is the development of a site within an already-developed area, either by building housing on land that was previously vacant or used for non-residential purposes, or by replacing low-density housing with higher-density dwellings. Infill development is becoming more common on transport corridors, near commercial hubs and in suburbs where there are older houses on large blocks of land.

In addition to some inner-city areas, urban infill contributed to strong population growth in SA2s such as Concord West - North Strathfield and neighbouring Homebush Bay - Silverwater in New South Wales (both up 1,100 people), Dandenong (1,100), Clayton (500) and Maribyrnong (440) in Victoria, and Nollamara - Westminster (910) and Cannington - Queens Park (860) in Western Australia.

GROWTH ALONG THE COAST

Generally, the most prominent growth outside of capital cities occurred along the coast of Australia, particularly in Queensland. The SA2 of Deeragun, west of Townsville's central business district, had the largest increase (up 1,800 people). Several SA2s on Queensland's Gold Coast also experienced large growth in 2011-12, including Upper Coomera - Willow Vale (up 1,700 people), Coomera (850) and Ormeau - Yatala (680).

On Australia's western seaboard, Busselton in the south and Karratha in the north both grew by 880 people between 2011 and 2012. Australind - Leschenault in Bunbury had the next largest growth, increasing by 830 people or 5.5%. This was the fastest growth in Western Australia outside of Greater Perth.

In Victoria, the coastal SA2 of Torquay in Geelong had the largest growth outside of Greater Melbourne in 2011-12, up 760 people. The nearby SA2s of Lara (up 550 people), Highton (490) and Leopold (480) also had strong growth. In New South Wales, Edgeworth - Cameron Park and Glendale - Cardiff - Hillsborough in Lake Macquarie had large growth, both increasing by 400 people.

GROWTH IN INLAND AREAS

Some inland SA2s outside of capital cities had strong growth in the 12 months to June 2012. In New South Wales, Maitland - West and Maitland - East had the largest increases in population outside of Greater Sydney, increasing by 810 and 440 people respectively. Large inland growth also occurred in Drouin (up 720 people) in Victoria's west Gippsland, and the Queensland towns of Emerald (720) in the Fitzroy region, and Mount Isa (520) in the state's north-west.

Rapid growth also occurred in some of the country's inland SA2s, including Bannockburn (up 5.7%), Drouin (5.3%) and Alfredton (4.9%) in Victoria, and Emerald (5.3%) and Clermont (4.7%) in Queensland.

POPULATION DECLINE

Many of the largest population declines between June 2011 and June 2012 were in well-established areas within Greater Melbourne and Greater Sydney. One explanation for this is that the population of these areas has gotten older and households have moved through the life cycle. The SA2 of Mill Park - North on the north-eastern outskirts of Greater Melbourne had the largest decline in the country, down 320 people. Also on the outskirts of Greater Melbourne, Taylors Lakes and Mill Park - South decreased by 260 and 220 people respectively. In New South Wales, Holsworthy - Wattle Grove, in Greater Sydney's south-west, decreased by 280 people, while St Clair in the outer west declined by 200.

Within the Australian Capital Territory, a number of older suburbs in the south decreased in population in 2011-12. SA2s with large declines included Kambah (down 180 people), Wanniassa (down 160) and Gordon (down 150) while there were fast declines in Macarthur (down 2.5%), Gowrie (down 2.2%) and Isabella Plains (down 2.1%).

Outside of Australia's capital cities, areas with large declines included Moe - Newborough (down 200 people) in Victoria's Latrobe Valley, Stawell (down 140) in the Grampians, Lavington (down 140) in Albury and Bathurst Region (down 130) in New South Wales' Central West.

POPULATION CHANGE BY REMOTENESS AREAS

The Remoteness Structure of the Australian Statistical Geography Standard identifies five Remoteness Area (RA) categories for Australia, ranging from Major Cities to Very Remote. As at June 2012, 70% of the population resided in Australia's major cities. In comparison, just 2.3% lived in remote or very remote Australia. Major cities were the fastest-growing RAs in Australia, up 1.8% in the year to June 2012. The remaining RAs grew slower than Australia as a whole (1.6%), with outer regional areas growing at the slowest rate (1.0%).

The state or territory (excluding the Australian Capital Territory) with the highest proportion of it's population living in the major cities RA was Western Australia at 77%, while Tasmania was the state with the highest proportion living in the inner regional RA (66%), which includes Hobart. Of all the states and territories, the Northern Territory had the highest proportion of it's population in the outer regional RA (56%), which includes Darwin, as well as the remote (21%) and very remote (23%) RAs.

Within the states and territories (excluding the Australian Capital Territory), the major cities RA had the fastest growth between 2011 and 2012 in Queensland, Victoria and New South Wales. In Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania, the inner regional RA was the fastest-growing, while in the Northern Territory, the outer regional RA grew the fastest.

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION BY REMOTENESS STRUCTURE(a)

ERP AT 30 JUNE
CHANGE
2011pr
2012p
2011pr-2012p
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Major Cities
5 327 695
5 395 212
67 517
1.3
Inner Regional
1 401 348
1 411 527
10 179
0.7
Outer Regional
443 112
444 247
1 135
0.3
Remote
30 762
30 808
46
0.1
Very Remote
8 551
8 551
-
-
Total
7 211 468
7 290 345
78 877
1.1
Vic.
Major Cities
4 214 469
4 291 705
77 236
1.8
Inner Regional
1 070 317
1 081 461
11 144
1.0
Outer Regional
244 962
245 596
634
0.3
Remote
4 778
4 730
-48
-1.0
Total
5 534 526
5 623 492
88 966
1.6
Qld
Major Cities
2 767 344
2 824 102
56 758
2.1
Inner Regional
907 773
923 908
16 135
1.8
Outer Regional
661 086
672 561
11 475
1.7
Remote
78 615
79 900
1 285
1.6
Very Remote
59 280
59 588
308
0.5
Total
4 474 098
4 560 059
85 961
1.9
SA
Major Cities
1 199 324
1 212 757
13 433
1.1
Inner Regional
177 128
179 258
2 130
1.2
Outer Regional
201 543
202 178
635
0.3
Remote
45 176
45 468
292
0.6
Very Remote
15 061
15 117
56
0.4
Total
1 638 232
1 654 778
16 546
1.0
WA
Major Cities
1 797 336
1 860 348
63 012
3.5
Inner Regional
209 612
217 334
7 722
3.7
Outer Regional
181 414
184 642
3 228
1.8
Remote
99 396
101 699
2 303
2.3
Very Remote
64 457
66 229
1 772
2.7
Total
2 352 215
2 430 252
78 037
3.3
Tas.
Inner Regional
334 969
335 731
762
0.2
Outer Regional
165 317
165 510
193
0.1
Remote
8 459
8 368
-91
-1.1
Very Remote
2 450
2 410
-40
-1.6
Total
511 195
512 019
824
0.2
NT
Outer Regional
129 062
131 678
2 616
2.0
Remote
48 512
48 878
366
0.8
Very Remote
53 757
54 280
523
1.0
Total
231 331
234 836
3 505
1.5
ACT
Major Cities
367 144
373 993
6 849
1.9
Inner Regional
608
665
57
9.4
Total
367 752
374 658
6 906
1.9
Australia(b)
Major Cities
15 673 312
15 958 117
284 805
1.8
Inner Regional
4 102 142
4 150 274
48 132
1.2
Outer Regional
2 026 496
2 046 412
19 916
1.0
Remote
315 698
319 851
4 153
1.3
Very Remote
206 285
208 919
2 634
1.3
Total
22 323 933
22 683 573
359 640
1.6

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) See paragraphs 18,19 and 21 of the Explanatory Notes.
(b) Includes Other Territories.


POPULATION DENSITY

Population density varies greatly across Australia, ranging from very low in very remote areas to very high in inner-city areas. Australia's population density at June 2012 was 3.0 people per square kilometre (sq km). Among the states and territories, the Australian Capital Territory had the highest population density at 160 people per sq km, followed by Victoria with 25, New South Wales with 9.1 and Tasmania with 7.5. The remaining states and territories all had population densities below the Australian figure, with the Northern Territory having the lowest at just 0.2 people per sq km.

Population density at June 2012 was highest within capital cites, particularly in Greater Sydney. Eight of the country's top ten most densely-populated SA2s were in Greater Sydney, including Pyrmont - Ultimo, which had the highest population density in Australia, at 13,900 people per sq km, Potts Point - Woolloomooloo (13,600), Darlinghurst (13,200) and Surry Hills (13,100). These areas all surround Sydney's central business district.

Within Greater Melbourne, the SA2s with the greatest population densities were inner-city Melbourne (10,100 people per sq km) and neighbouring Carlton (8,400). In Greater Brisbane, New Farm (6,000 people per sq km) and Kangaroo Point (5,800) had the highest population densities.

At the other end of the scale, over 200 SA2s in Australia had population densities of less than one person per sq km at June 2012, the majority of which were in Queensland, Western Australia and New South Wales.

In the year to 2012, the SA2 with the largest increase in population density was Melbourne, which added an extra 860 people per sq km. This was followed by Bonner (up 620 people per sq km), Forde (480) and Crace (450), which are all new suburbs in the north of the Australian Capital Territory.

POPULATION DENSITY BY SA2, Australia - June 2012
Diagram: POPULATION DENSITY BY SA2, Australia—June 2012



CENTRE OF POPULATION

The centre of population is one way in which the spatial distribution of Australia's population can be described. This point marks the average latitude and longitude around which the population is distributed.

Australia's centre of population at June 2012 was 34 kilometres east of the small service town of Ivanhoe, in western New South Wales. This reflects the concentration of population in south-east Australia. The centre of population moved 5.1 kilometres west between 2011 and 2012. This shift reflects rapid population growth in Western Australia over this period.

CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia - June 2011 and June 2012
Diagram: CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia—June 2011 and June 2012


ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION, States and Territories - Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (GCCSAs)

ERP AT 30 JUNE
CHANGE
2011pr
2012p
2011pr-2012p
GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Greater Sydney
4 605 992
4 667 283
61 291
1.3
Rest of NSW
2 605 476
2 623 062
17 586
0.7
Total
7 211 468
7 290 345
78 877
1.1
Vic.
Greater Melbourne
4 169 103
4 246 345
77 242
1.9
Rest of Vic.
1 365 423
1 377 147
11 724
0.9
Total
5 534 526
5 623 492
88 966
1.6
Qld
Greater Brisbane
2 146 577
2 189 878
43 301
2.0
Rest of Qld
2 327 521
2 370 181
42 660
1.8
Total
4 474 098
4 560 059
85 961
1.9
SA
Greater Adelaide
1 262 940
1 277 174
14 234
1.1
Rest of SA
375 292
377 604
2 312
0.6
Total
1 638 232
1 654 778
16 546
1.0
WA
Greater Perth
1 832 114
1 897 548
65 434
3.6
Rest of WA
520 101
532 704
12 603
2.4
Total
2 352 215
2 430 252
78 037
3.3
Tas.
Greater Hobart
216 276
216 959
683
0.3
Rest of Tas.
294 919
295 060
141
-
Total
511 195
512 019
824
0.2
NT
Greater Darwin
129 062
131 678
2 616
2.0
Rest of NT
102 269
103 158
889
0.9
Total
231 331
234 836
3 505
1.5
Australian Capital Territory
367 752
374 658
6 906
1.9
Other Territories
3 116
3 134
18
0.6
Australia(a)
Greater Capital City
14 729 816
15 001 523
271 707
1.8
Rest of Australia
7 594 117
7 682 050
87 933
1.2
Total
22 323 933
22 683 573
359 640
1.6

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) Includes Other Territories.

SA3s WITH LARGEST AND FASTEST POPULATION GROWTH IN 2011-2012

ERP at 30 June
Change
2011pr
2012p
2011pr-2012p
National rank & SA3(a) GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

LARGEST GROWTH

1 Wyndham Greater Melbourne
170 691
183 513
12 822
7.5
2 Whittlesea - Wallan Greater Melbourne
172 591
181 934
9 343
5.4
3 Wanneroo Greater Perth
160 332
169 223
8 891
5.5
4 Stirling Greater Perth
189 944
196 619
6 675
3.5
5 Melton - Bacchus Marsh Greater Melbourne
127 813
133 622
5 809
4.5
6 Casey - South Greater Melbourne
131 760
137 121
5 361
4.1
7 Gungahlin Australian Capital Territory
49 734
54 864
5 130
10.3
8 Melbourne City Greater Melbourne
100 603
105 696
5 093
5.1
9 Rockingham Greater Perth
109 101
114 172
5 071
4.6
10 Swan Greater Perth
108 572
113 525
4 953
4.6
11 Ormeau - Oxenford Rest of Qld
96 481
101 253
4 772
4.9
12 Townsville Rest of Qld
180 461
184 768
4 307
2.4
13 Sydney Inner City Greater Sydney
188 920
193 144
4 224
2.2
14 Cardinia Greater Melbourne
75 739
79 944
4 205
5.6
15 Gosnells Greater Perth
112 244
116 292
4 048
3.6
16 Cockburn Greater Perth
92 909
96 818
3 909
4.2
17 Armadale Greater Perth
65 281
69 108
3 827
5.9
18 Mandurah Greater Perth
87 528
91 272
3 744
4.3
19 Tullamarine - Broadmeadows Greater Melbourne
139 077
142 505
3 428
2.5
20 North Lakes Greater Brisbane
52 919
56 315
3 396
6.4

FASTEST GROWTH

1 Gungahlin Australian Capital Territory
49 734
54 864
5 130
10.3
2 Serpentine - Jarrahdale Greater Perth
18 531
20 019
1 488
8.0
3 Wyndham Greater Melbourne
170 691
183 513
12 822
7.5
4 Kwinana Greater Perth
30 671
32 667
1 996
6.5
5 North Lakes Greater Brisbane
52 919
56 315
3 396
6.4
6 Armadale Greater Perth
65 281
69 108
3 827
5.9
7 Cardinia Greater Melbourne
75 739
79 944
4 205
5.6
8 Wanneroo Greater Perth
160 332
169 223
8 891
5.5
9 Whittlesea - Wallan Greater Melbourne
172 591
181 934
9 343
5.4
10 Melbourne City Greater Melbourne
100 603
105 696
5 093
5.1
11 Ormeau - Oxenford Rest of Qld
96 481
101 253
4 772
4.9
12 Rockingham Greater Perth
109 101
114 172
5 071
4.6
13 Springfield - Redbank Greater Brisbane
68 534
71 668
3 134
4.6
14 Swan Greater Perth
108 572
113 525
4 953
4.6
15 Melton - Bacchus Marsh Greater Melbourne
127 813
133 622
5 809
4.5
16 Mandurah Greater Perth
87 528
91 272
3 744
4.3
17 Forest Lake - Oxley Greater Brisbane
66 049
68 856
2 807
4.2
18 Cockburn Greater Perth
92 909
96 818
3 909
4.2
19 Palmerston Greater Darwin
29 208
30 423
1 215
4.2
20 Casey - South Greater Melbourne
131 760
137 121
5 361
4.1

(a) National rank based on population change between June 2011 and June 2012. See paragraphs 25 and 26 of the Explanatory Notes.
(b) Excludes SA3s with a population of less than 1,000 at June 2011.

SA3s WITH LARGEST AND FASTEST POPULATION DECLINES IN 2011-2012

ERP at 30 June
Change
2011pr
2012p
2011pr-2012p
National rank & SA3(a) GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

LARGEST DECLINES

1 Tuggeranong Australian Capital Territory
89 131
87 950
-1 181
-1.3
2 Glenelg - Southern Grampians Rest of Vic.
36 411
36 154
-257
-0.7
3 West Coast Rest of Tas.
18 833
18 633
-200
-1.1
4 Hobart Inner Greater Hobart
50 499
50 324
-175
-0.3
5 Manningham - East Greater Melbourne
26 635
26 462
-173
-0.6
6 Grampians Rest of Vic.
59 894
59 745
-149
-0.2
7 Coffs Harbour Rest of NSW
84 266
84 135
-131
-0.2
8 North East Rest of Tas.
37 946
37 822
-124
-0.3
9 Wangaratta - Benalla Rest of Vic.
44 692
44 609
-83
-0.2
10 Lower Murray Rest of NSW
12 796
12 718
-78
-0.6

FASTEST DECLINES

1 Tuggeranong Australian Capital Territory
89 131
87 950
-1 181
-1.3
2 Fyshwick - Pialligo - Hume Australian Capital Territory
1 530
1 511
-19
-1.2
3 West Coast Rest of Tas.
18 833
18 633
-200
-1.1
4 Glenelg - Southern Grampians Rest of Vic.
36 411
36 154
-257
-0.7
5 Manningham - East Greater Melbourne
26 635
26 462
-173
-0.6
6 Lower Murray Rest of NSW
12 796
12 718
-78
-0.6
7 Hobart Inner Greater Hobart
50 499
50 324
-175
-0.3
8 North East Rest of Tas.
37 946
37 822
-124
-0.3
9 Grampians Rest of Vic.
59 894
59 745
-149
-0.2
10 Weston Creek Australian Capital Territory
23 218
23 171
-47
-0.2

(a) National rank based on population change between June 2011 and June 2012. See paragraphs 25 and 26 of the Explanatory Notes.

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