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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2010-11 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/03/2012   
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MAIN FEATURES


Population change

State and territory highlights

Capital city growth

Inner-city growth

Outer suburban growth

Urban infill

Growth along the coast

Growth in inland areas

Population declines

Population change by Remoteness Areas

Population density

Centre of population


POPULATION CHANGE

Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) reached 22.62 million at 30 June 2011, increasing by 320,800 people since 30 June 2010. This represents an annual growth rate of 1.4%, the lowest since the year ended 30 June 2006 and lower than the annual average growth rate of 1.8% over the five years to June 2011.

All states and territories experienced population growth in 2010-11, with the largest population increases continuing to be in Australia's three most populous states. Victoria had the greatest growth (up by 84,200 people), followed by New South Wales (82,200) and Queensland (74,800). This is only the third time in the last ten years that Queensland has not had the largest growth of all states and territories.

For the fifth consecutive year, Western Australia had the fastest population growth rate at 2.4% in 2010-11, ahead of the Australian Capital Territory (1.9%), Queensland (1.7%), and Victoria (1.5%). The remaining states and territories had population growth rates below the Australian average, with the Northern Territory experiencing the slowest growth at 0.4%.

Population growth continued to be most prominent in inner-city areas, outer suburbs, urban infill areas and along the coast. Areas that have seen decline include inland, rural areas that have been affected by drought in the last few years.

SLA POPULATION CHANGE, Australia - 2010-11
Diagram: SLA POPULATION CHANGE, Australia—2010–11


The following commentary refers mainly to population changes in Local Government Areas (LGAs), however in some cases, selected Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) are referred to particularly where LGAs cover multiple SLAs, such as in Brisbane (C), or don't exist, such as in the Australian Capital Territory.

STATE AND TERRITORY HIGHLIGHTS

New South Wales
  • Sydney SD reached 4.63 million people, an increase of 59,800 (1.3%), and continued to be the most populated capital city in Australia.
  • In 2010-11, the six fastest-growing LGAs in New South Wales were all within Sydney SD, including Canada Bay (A) (3.0%) in the inner west, Camden (A) (2.8%) in the outer south-west, and Parramatta (C) (2.5%) in central western Sydney.
  • Nine of the ten fastest growing LGAs outside Sydney SD were in inland New South Wales, led by Maitland (C) (2.1%) in the Hunter region, and Orange (C) (2.0%) in central western New South Wales.


Victoria
  • Melbourne SD's growth of 66,900 people was the largest of all the Australian capital city SDs in 2010-11.
  • The largest population growth in Victoria in 2010-11 continued to occur in the outer suburban fringes of Melbourne SD. Wyndham (C), located to the south-west of Melbourne's city centre, had the largest growth, increasing by 12,200 people (7.8%). This was followed by Whittlesea (C) (up 8,700 people or 5.6%), located to the north of Melbourne, and Melton (S) (6,000 or 5.6%), to the west.
  • Within regional Victoria, the LGA of Greater Geelong (C), located south-west of Melbourne SD, had the largest increase in population (3,300 people) in 2010-11. This was followed by Ballarat (C) (1,900 people), in Victoria's west, and Greater Bendigo (C) (1,500) in central Victoria.


Queensland
  • At June 2011, the three most populous LGAs in Australia were located in south-east Queensland. They were Brisbane (C), Gold Coast (C) and Moreton Bay (R).
  • The LGA of Brisbane (C) had the largest increase in population in Australia between June 2010 and June 2011, with an increase of 14,100 people.
  • The LGAs with the fastest growth in the state were outside of south-east Queensland, with Cook (S) growing by 6.4% and Gladstone (R) by 3.5%.


South Australia
  • In 2010-11, the LGAs with the largest population growth in the state were Playford (C), in Adelaide's northern suburbs, which increased by 2,400 people, and Onkaparinga (C), in Adelaide's southern suburbs, which increased by 2,000 people.
  • Playford (C) was also the fastest-growing LGA in the state, increasing by 3.0%.


Western Australia
  • Strong population growth continued in 2010-11, especially in the outer suburban fringes of Perth SD. The LGA of Wanneroo (C) increased by 6,200 people and Rockingham (C) by 3,900.
  • South West SD was the state's fastest-growing region (3.0%), followed by Pilbara SD (2.7%) and Perth SD (2.5%).


Tasmania
  • Latrobe (M) (up 2.3%) in the north and Kingborough (M) (2.0%) in the south were the fastest-growing LGAs in Tasmania.
  • The LGAs with the largest growth were Kingborough (M) (up 680 people), Clarence (C) (660) and Brighton (M) (310), all within commuting distance of Hobart.


Northern Territory
  • While Darwin SD had the slowest growth of all the Australian capital city SDs at 0.5%, it accounted for 75% of the territory's population growth, and was home to 56% of its population.
  • Litchfield (M) recorded the largest growth of all Northern Territory LGAs, increasing by 320 people.


Australian Capital Territory
  • In 2010-11, population growth was largest in northern suburban Canberra, especially in the SLAs of Franklin (1,200 people), Forde (1,000), Bonner (920) and Casey (870).
  • For the fourth year in a row, the combined population of the northern SSDs (191,700 people) was greater than that of the combined southern SSDs (173,900).


CAPITAL CITY GROWTH

At 30 June 2011, more than 14.50 million people, close to two-thirds of Australia's population, resided in a capital city Statistical Division (SD). The combined population of capital city SDs increased by 224,400 in the 12 months to June 2011.

In 2010-11, Melbourne recorded the largest growth of all capital city SDs, increasing by 66,900 people, followed by Sydney (59,800), Perth (42,800), and Brisbane (34,800). Population growth in Melbourne SD equated to an average increase of close to 1,300 people per week, while the population of Sydney SD increased by over 1,100 people per week.

Population growth in Australia's capital city SDs occurred at a rate of 1.6% in 2010-11, faster than that in the remainder of Australia (1.2%). Perth SD had the fastest growth of all capital cities (up 2.5%), ahead of Canberra SD (1.9%) and Brisbane SD (1.7%). The slowest growth rates were in Darwin SD (0.5%), Adelaide SD (0.9%) and Greater Hobart SD (1.0%).

INNER-CITY GROWTH

The inner-city LGAs of Sydney (C) and Melbourne (C) had population increases among the largest in Australia in 2010-11, increasing by 3,500 and 2,500 people respectively. Perth (C) was the fastest-growing of all the inner capital city LGAs, increasing in population from 18,000 to 18,600 people or 3.7%. Within the Brisbane (C) LGA, the SLA of City - Inner was among the fastest-growing, increasing by 6.6%.

The 2010-11 growth rates in all capital city LGAs were lower than their average annual growth rates over the five years to June 2011.

OUTER SUBURBAN GROWTH

Many LGAs which had large and/or rapid growth were located on or near the boundaries of capital city SDs, where more land tends to be available for subdivision and housing development. In Melbourne SD, the population of outer suburban Wyndham (C) increased by 12,200 (7.8%) in the 12 months to June 2011. This was both the largest and fastest increase of all Victorian LGAs, and the fastest in the country. Strong growth was also experienced in Whittlesea (C) (up 8,700 people or 5.6%) and Melton (C) (6,000 people or 5.6%).

Among the New South Wales LGAs with the largest population increases in 2010-11 were outer suburban Blacktown (C) (up 5,800 people), Liverpool (C) (3,400) and The Hills Shire (2,600).

The LGAs of Wanneroo (C) and Rockingham (C), on the northern and south-western outskirts of Perth SD recorded strong growth in the year to June 2011, increasing by 6,200 and 3,900 people respectively.

In the Brisbane SD, the largest growth in 2010-11 occurred in the outer suburban SLAs of Ipswich (C) - East (2,900 people), Griffin-Mango Hill (1,800) and Ipswich (C) - Central (1,700).

Outer suburban areas in the smaller capital city SDs also experienced some of the strongest growth in their states or territories. The largest population increases of all LGAs in South Australia in 2010-11 were the outer Adelaide LGAs of Playford (C) (up 2,400) and Onkaparinga (C) (2,000). On the outskirts of Darwin, the population in the SLA of Palmerston (C) Bal increased by 480 and in Lee Point-Leanyer Swamp by 310. In Greater Hobart, the outer LGA of Kingborough (M) increased by 680 people, the largest increase in Tasmania; and in Canberra, the SLAs of Franklin and Forde had the largest growth, increasing by 1,200 and 1,000 people respectively.

URBAN INFILL

Urban infill is the development of a site within an already-developed area, either by building housing on land that was previously vacant or used for non-residential purposes, or by replacing low-density housing with higher-density dwellings. Infill development is becoming more common on transport corridors, near commercial hubs and in suburbs where there are older houses on large blocks of land.

In 2010-11, urban infill contributed to a large population increase in Parramatta (C) (up 4,300 people), Canada Bay (A) (2,400) and Auburn (1,900). These LGAs are all located along the Parramatta River in western Sydney.

In Victoria, urban infill contributed to a large increase in population in a number of LGAs including Monash (C), located to the east of Melbourne, which increased by 1,600 people in the 12 months to June 2011.

GROWTH ALONG THE COAST

Outside of capital city SDs, the largest population growth generally occurred along the Australian coast in 2010-11. Several LGAs on Queensland's seaboard had large population increases including the Gold Coast (C) (up 9,600 people) and Sunshine Coast (R) (5,000) in south-east Queensland, and Townsville (C) (4,500) and Cairns (R) (2,600) in the north.

In the 12 months to June 2011, the neighbouring seaside LGAs of Lake Macquarie (C) and Newcastle (C) in the New South Wales Hunter region experienced the state's largest growth outside of Sydney SD (both up 1,800 people). Shoalhaven (C), on the coast to the south, also had large growth (up 1,300 people).

Many coastal LGAs in Western Australia were also among the fastest-growing in Australia in 2010-11, with rapid population growth occurring in Mandurah (C) (5.3%), Exmouth (S) (4.3%) and Capel (S) (4.0%).

GROWTH IN INLAND AREAS

Some LGAs in inland areas outside of capital city SDs also grew rapidly in the 12 months to June 2011. Moorabool (S) in Victoria to the west of Melbourne SD, experienced the fastest increase of all inland LGAs (up 3.0%). Other fast growing inland LGAs include Somerset (R) which adjoins Brisbane SD to the west, Chittering (S) which is north of Perth SD and Mitchell (S) which is north of Melbourne SD (all up 2.9%).

Large inland growth occurred in the LGA of Toowoomba (R) (up 2,200 people), to the west of Brisbane, and the regional cities of Ballarat (C) (1,900) and Greater Bendingo (C) (1,500), to the north-west of Melbourne.

POPULATION DECLINES

The largest declines in population were in the LGAs of Alice Springs (T) (down 370 people) in central Australia, and Wellington (A) (down 140) in western New South Wales. This was followed by Gannawarra (S) (down 130), in north-west Victoria, and Katherine (T) (also down 130), south of Darwin SD.

Other population losses mainly occurred in inland rural Australia, particularly in north-western parts of Victoria. These are agricultural areas that may have been affected by flooding or drought in the last few years, or mining areas and include Yarriambiack (S) and Northern Grampians (S) (both down 100), and Buloke (S) (down 90).

The fastest decline in population occurred in the LGA of West Coast (M) (down 2.1%), which contains many of Tasmania's mines, followed by Barunga West (DC) (1.9%) in South Australia, and Wellington (A) (1.5%) in New South Wales.

POPULATION CHANGE BY REMOTENESS AREAS

As at June 2011, 68.8% of the population resided in Australia's major cities, as defined in the Remoteness Structure of the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (cat. no. 1216.0). In comparison, just 2.2% lived in remote or very remote Australia. Major cities and inner regional areas were the fastest-growing remoteness areas (RAs) in Australia (both 1.5%) in the 12 months to June 2011. The remaining RAs grew slower than Australia as a whole (1.4%), with remote areas growing at the slowest rate (0.7%).

The Australian Capital Territory had the greatest proportion of its population living in the major cities RA (99.8%) while Tasmania had the highest percentage (64.9%) living in inner regional Australia, which includes Hobart. The Northern Territory had the highest proportion of its population living in outer regional Australia (56.1%), which includes Darwin, as well as remote (20.9%) and very remote (23.0%) Australia.

In 2010-11, major cities were the fastest-growing RAs in the Australian Capital Territory (1.9%), Queensland (1.7%) and New South Wales (1.3%), while inner regional areas were the fastest-growing in Western Australia (3.7%), South Australia (1.1%) and Tasmania (0.8%). Victoria's major cities and inner regional areas each had growth of 1.6%. Very remote RAs had the fastest growth in the Northern Territory (1.1%).

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION BY REMOTENESS STRUCTURE(a)

ERP AT 30 JUNE
CHANGE
2010r
2011p
2010r-2011p
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Major Cities
5 270 367
5 336 485
66 118
1.3
Inner Regional
1 459 075
1 473 709
14 634
1.0
Outer Regional
453 162
454 655
1 493
0.3
Remote
32 932
32 856
-76
-0.2
Very Remote
4 484
4 469
-15
-0.3
Total
7 220 020
7 302 174
82 154
1.1
Vic.
Major Cities
4 165 093
4 230 795
65 702
1.6
Inner Regional
1 107 802
1 125 695
17 893
1.6
Outer Regional
259 451
260 042
591
0.2
Remote
4 714
4 678
-36
-0.8
Total
5 537 060
5 621 210
84 150
1.5
Qld
Major Cities
2 694 160
2 740 712
46 552
1.7
Inner Regional
989 448
1 005 595
16 147
1.6
Outer Regional
683 994
694 895
10 901
1.6
Remote
87 064
87 972
908
1.0
Very Remote
50 767
51 108
341
0.7
Total
4 505 433
4 580 282
74 849
1.7
SA
Major Cities
1 195 911
1 206 534
10 623
0.9
Inner Regional
202 053
204 218
2 165
1.1
Outer Regional
184 933
184 970
37
-
Remote
46 461
46 541
80
0.2
Very Remote
14 092
14 036
-56
-0.4
Total
1 643 450
1 656 299
12 849
0.8
WA
Major Cities
1 632 548
1 671 569
39 021
2.4
Inner Regional
307 121
318 413
11 292
3.7
Outer Regional
205 472
208 413
2 941
1.4
Remote
98 686
100 507
1 821
1.8
Very Remote
49 660
50 423
763
1.5
Total
2 293 487
2 349 325
55 838
2.4
Tas.
Inner Regional
328 584
331 270
2 686
0.8
Outer Regional
168 259
168 907
648
0.4
Remote
7 857
7 784
-73
-0.9
Very Remote
2 581
2 558
-23
-0.9
Total
507 281
510 519
3 238
0.6
NT
Outer Regional
128 471
129 154
683
0.5
Remote
48 618
48 246
-372
-0.8
Very Remote
52 379
52 969
590
1.1
Total
229 468
230 369
901
0.4
ACT
Major Cities
358 203
364 982
6 779
1.9
Inner Regional
641
639
-2
-0.3
Total
358 844
365 621
6 777
1.9
Australia(b)
Major Cities
15 316 282
15 551 077
234 795
1.5
Inner Regional
4 395 119
4 459 939
64 820
1.5
Outer Regional
2 083 742
2 101 036
17 294
0.8
Remote
326 332
328 584
2 252
0.7
Very Remote
176 040
177 658
1 618
0.9
Total
22 297 515
22 618 294
320 779
1.4

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) See paragraphs 21 to 23 and paragraph 30 of the Explanatory Notes. Also see the Population Estimates by Remoteness Area Data Cube in the Downloads tab.
(b) Includes Other Territories.


POPULATION DENSITY

Population density varies greatly across Australia, ranging from very low in remote areas to very high in inner-city areas. Australia's population density at June 2011 was 2.9 people per square kilometre (sq km). Among the states and territories, the Australian Capital Territory had the highest population density at 160 people per sq km, followed by Victoria with 25, New South Wales with 9.1 and Tasmania with 7.5. The remaining states and territories all had population densities below the Australian figure, with the Northern Territory having the lowest at just 0.2 people per sq km.

Population density at June 2011 was highest in capital city SDs, particularly in Sydney SD. Six of the top ten most densely-populated SLAs were in Sydney SD, including Sydney (C) - East, which had the highest population density in Australia (8,900 people per sq km), the neighbouring Sydney (C) - West (8,000) and Waverley (A) (7,600), which is located just east of the Sydney (C) LGA and contains the beach-side suburbs of Bondi and Bronte.

Within Melbourne SD, the SLAs with the greatest population densities were Melbourne (C) - Inner (8,200 people per sq km) and nearby Port Phillip (C) - St Kilda (6,500). In Brisbane SD, New Farm (6,000) and Kangaroo Point (5,700) had the highest population densities.

At the other end of the scale, there were over 240 SLAs in Australia which had population densities of less than one person per sq km at June 2011, one-third of which were located in Western Australia.

In 2010-11, the five SLAs which recorded the largest increases in population density from the previous year were all in the Australian Capital Territory. These were Forde (an extra 540 people per sq km), Franklin (510), City (350), Casey (330) and Bonner (330). With the exception of the City SLA, these are all relatively newly developed areas.

POPULATION DENSITY BY SLA, Australia - June 2011
Diagram: POPULATION DENSITY BY SLA, Australia—June 2011



CENTRE OF POPULATION

The centre of population is one way in which the spatial distribution of Australia's population can be described. This point marks the average latitude and longitude around which the population is distributed.

Australia's centre of population at June 2011 was approximately 44 kilometres east of the small service town of Ivanhoe, in the western New South Wales LGA of Central Darling (A). The centre of population moved approximately 11.9 kilometres north-west in the five years from June 2006 to June 2011. This shift reflects strong population growth in Queensland and Western Australia.

CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia - June 2006 and June 2011
Diagram: CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia—June 2006 and June 2011

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION, States and Territories - Capital City and Balance of State/Territory

ERP AT 30 JUNE
CHANGE
2010r
2011p
2010r-2011p
Part of S/T
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Sydney SD
4 567 578
4 627 345
59 767
1.3
Balance of state
2 652 442
2 674 829
22 387
0.8
Total
7 220 020
7 302 174
82 154
1.1
Vic.
Melbourne SD
4 070 514
4 137 432
66 918
1.6
Balance of state
1 466 546
1 483 778
17 232
1.2
Total
5 537 060
5 621 210
84 150
1.5
Qld
Brisbane SD
2 039 379
2 074 222
34 843
1.7
Balance of state
2 466 054
2 506 060
40 006
1.6
Total
4 505 433
4 580 282
74 849
1.7
SA
Adelaide SD
1 202 357
1 212 982
10 625
0.9
Balance of state
441 093
443 317
2 224
0.5
Total
1 643 450
1 656 299
12 849
0.8
WA
Perth SD
1 696 043
1 738 807
42 764
2.5
Balance of state
597 444
610 518
13 074
2.2
Total
2 293 487
2 349 325
55 838
2.4
Tas.
Greater Hobart SD
214 551
216 656
2 105
1.0
Balance of state
292 730
293 863
1 133
0.4
Total
507 281
510 519
3 238
0.6
NT
Darwin SD
127 397
128 073
676
0.5
Balance of territory
102 071
102 296
225
0.2
Total
229 468
230 369
901
0.4
ACT
Canberra SD
358 494
365 240
6 746
1.9
Balance of territory
350
381
31
8.9
Total
358 844
365 621
6 777
1.9
Other Territories
2 472
2 495
23
0.9
Australia
Capital City
14 276 313
14 500 757
224 444
1.6
Balance of Australia(a)
8 021 202
8 117 537
96 335
1.2
Total
22 297 515
22 618 294
320 779
1.4

(a) Includes Other Territories.

LGAs WITH LARGEST POPULATION CHANGES IN 2010-11

ERP at 30 June
Change
2010r
2011p
2010r-11p
National rank & LGA(a) Part of S/T
no.
no.
no.
%

LARGEST INCREASES

1 Brisbane (C) Brisbane
1 065 292
1 079 392
14 100
1.3
2 Wyndham (C) Melbourne
156 322
168 552
12 230
7.8
3 Gold Coast (C) Qld Bal
526 843
536 480
9 637
1.8
4 Whittlesea (C) Melbourne
154 864
163 539
8 675
5.6
5 Moreton Bay (R) Brisbane
381 566
389 684
8 118
2.1
6 Wanneroo (C) Perth
150 103
156 337
6 234
4.2
7 Melton (S) Melbourne
106 979
112 981
6 002
5.6
8 Casey (C) Melbourne
255 251
261 198
5 947
2.3
9 Blacktown (C) Sydney
307 280
313 057
5 777
1.9
10 Logan (C) Brisbane
282 147
287 472
5 325
1.9
11 Sunshine Coast (R) Qld Bal
330 318
335 273
4 955
1.5
12 Ipswich (C) Brisbane
167 818
172 738
4 920
2.9
13 Townsville (C) Qld Bal
185 420
189 931
4 511
2.4
14 Cardinia (S) Melbourne
73 201
77 536
4 335
5.9
15 Parramatta (C) Sydney
172 034
176 355
4 321
2.5
16 Stirling (C) Perth
202 011
205 961
3 950
2.0
17 Rockingham (C) Perth
104 129
108 022
3 893
3.7
18 Hume (C) Melbourne
171 721
175 606
3 885
2.3
19 Mandurah (C) WA Bal
70 412
74 127
3 715
5.3
20 Sydney (C) Sydney
181 908
185 422
3 514
1.9
21 Liverpool (C) Sydney
185 158
188 577
3 419
1.8
22 Greater Geelong (C) Vic. Bal
219 716
223 047
3 331
1.5
23 Armadale (C) Perth
60 982
64 284
3 302
5.4
24 Joondalup (C) Perth
164 442
167 634
3 192
1.9
25 Swan (C) Perth
112 958
116 068
3 110
2.8

LARGEST DECLINES

1 Alice Springs (T) NT Bal
27 957
27 589
-368
-1.3
2 Wellington (A) NSW Bal
8 860
8 725
-135
-1.5
3 Gannawarra (S) Vic. Bal
11 598
11 467
-131
-1.1
4 Katherine (T) NT Bal
10 093
9 967
-126
-1.2
5 West Coast (M) Tas. Bal
5 247
5 139
-108
-2.1
6 Yarriambiack (S) Vic. Bal
7 602
7 498
-104
-1.4
7 Wattle Range (DC) SA Bal
12 615
12 512
-103
-0.8
8 Northern Grampians (S) Vic. Bal
12 296
12 196
-100
-0.8
9 Buloke (S) Vic. Bal
7 017
6 925
-92
-1.3
10 Southern Grampians (S) Vic. Bal
17 503
17 411
-92
-0.5
11 Hindmarsh (S) Vic. Bal
6 140
6 054
-86
-1.4
12 Central Goldfields (S) Vic. Bal
12 876
12 792
-84
-0.7
13 Broken Hill (C) NSW Bal
19 784
19 703
-81
-0.4
14 Loddon (S) Vic. Bal
8 034
7 957
-77
-1.0
15 Port Pirie City and Dists (M) SA Bal
18 242
18 169
-73
-0.4
16 West Wimmera (S) Vic. Bal
4 584
4 521
-63
-1.4
17 Manjimup (S) WA Bal
10 159
10 098
-61
-0.6
18 Towong (S) Vic. Bal
6 333
6 276
-57
-0.9
19 Renmark Paringa (DC) SA Bal
9 891
9 834
-57
-0.6
20 Brookton (S) WA Bal
1 006
952
-54
-5.4
21 Kentish (M) Tas. Bal
6 282
6 229
-53
-0.8
22 Walgett (A) NSW Bal
7 222
7 171
-51
-0.7
23 Barunga West (DC) SA Bal
2 632
2 581
-51
-1.9
24 Tea Tree Gully (C) Adelaide
100 524
100 474
-50
-
25 Port Augusta (C) SA Bal
14 774
14 725
-49
-0.3

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) National Rank based on population change between June 2010 and June 2011. See paragraphs 18 and 19 of the Explanatory Notes.

LGAs WITH FASTEST POPULATION CHANGES IN 2010-11

ERP at 30 June
Change
2010r
2011p
2010r-2011p
National rank & LGA(a) Part of S/T
no.
no.
no.
%

FASTEST INCREASES

1 Wyndham (C) Melbourne
156 322
168 552
12 230
7.8
2 Serpentine-Jarrahdale (S) Perth
17 212
18 395
1 183
6.9
3 Cook (S) Qld Bal
3 969
4 222
253
6.4
4 Cardinia (S) Melbourne
73 201
77 536
4 335
5.9
5 Melton (S) Melbourne
106 979
112 981
6 002
5.6
6 Whittlesea (C) Melbourne
154 864
163 539
8 675
5.6
7 Armadale (C) Perth
60 982
64 284
3 302
5.4
8 Mandurah (C) WA Bal
70 412
74 127
3 715
5.3
9 Kwinana (T) Perth
29 029
30 433
1 404
4.8
10 Exmouth (S) WA Bal
2 487
2 595
108
4.3
11 Wanneroo (C) Perth
150 103
156 337
6 234
4.2
12 Capel (S) WA Bal
13 370
13 899
529
4.0
13 Rockingham (C) Perth
104 129
108 022
3 893
3.7
14 Perth (C) Perth
17 955
18 616
661
3.7
15 Ashburton (S) WA Bal
6 730
6 977
247
3.7
16 Bass Coast (S) Vic. Bal
30 924
32 056
1 132
3.7
17 Gladstone (R) Qld Bal
60 204
62 319
2 115
3.5
18 Roebourne (S) WA Bal
19 143
19 782
639
3.3
19 Augusta-Margaret River (S) WA Bal
12 509
12 913
404
3.2
20 Harvey (S) WA Bal
24 151
24 901
750
3.1
21 Playford (C) Adelaide
79 795
82 219
2 424
3.0
22 Broome (S) WA Bal
16 298
16 792
494
3.0
23 Canada Bay (A) Sydney
78 598
80 954
2 356
3.0
24 Moorabool (S) Vic. Bal
28 560
29 409
849
3.0
25 Cockburn (C) Perth
91 312
94 003
2 691
2.9

FASTEST DECLINES

1 West Coast (M) Tas. Bal
5 247
5 139
-108
-2.1
2 Barunga West (DC) SA Bal
2 632
2 581
-51
-1.9
3 Wellington (A) NSW Bal
8 860
8 725
-135
-1.5
4 Hindmarsh (S) Vic. Bal
6 140
6 054
-86
-1.4
5 Balranald (A) NSW Bal
2 472
2 438
-34
-1.4
6 West Wimmera (S) Vic. Bal
4 584
4 521
-63
-1.4
7 Yarriambiack (S) Vic. Bal
7 602
7 498
-104
-1.4
8 Alice Springs (T) NT Bal
27 957
27 589
-368
-1.3
9 Buloke (S) Vic. Bal
7 017
6 925
-92
-1.3
10 Katherine (T) NT Bal
10 093
9 967
-126
-1.2
11 Gannawarra (S) Vic. Bal
11 598
11 467
-131
-1.1
12 Southern Mallee (DC) SA Bal
2 171
2 147
-24
-1.1
13 Lockhart (A) NSW Bal
3 312
3 279
-33
-1.0
14 Loddon (S) Vic. Bal
8 034
7 957
-77
-1.0
15 Towong (S) Vic. Bal
6 333
6 276
-57
-0.9
16 Kentish (M) Tas. Bal
6 282
6 229
-53
-0.8
17 Hay (A) NSW Bal
3 343
3 315
-28
-0.8
18 Wattle Range (DC) SA Bal
12 615
12 512
-103
-0.8
19 Northern Grampians (S) Vic. Bal
12 296
12 196
-100
-0.8
20 Central Highlands (M) Tas. Bal
2 320
2 303
-17
-0.7
21 Torres Strait Island (R) Qld Bal
5 071
5 035
-36
-0.7
22 Walgett (A) NSW Bal
7 222
7 171
-51
-0.7
23 Goyder (DC) SA Bal
4 284
4 256
-28
-0.7
24 Central Goldfields (S) Vic. Bal
12 876
12 792
-84
-0.7
25 Wentworth (A) NSW Bal
7 108
7 065
-43
-0.6

(a) National rank based on population change between June 2010 and June 2011, excluding LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2010. See paragraphs 18 and 19 of the Explanatory Notes.



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