4364.0.55.001 - National Health Survey: First Results, 2014-15  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 23/03/2016   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY, 2014-15


SOUTH AUSTRALIA

General health

  • Considered themselves to be in excellent or very good health – 740,200 people (54.8% of persons aged 15 years and over in SA)
  • Experienced high or very high levels of psychological distress – 175,800 people (13.7% of persons aged 18 years and over in SA)

Compared with Australia, South Australia had a higher rate of high or very high psychological distress.

Long-term health conditions
  • Arthritis – 300,600 people (18.3% of persons in SA)
  • Asthma – 173,100 people (10.5%)
  • Cancer – 31,900 people (1.9%)
  • Diabetes – 92,000 people (5.6%)
  • Hayfever – 349,900 people (21.3%)
  • Heart disease – 91,300 people (5.6%)
  • High cholesterol – 138,000 people (8.4%)
  • Hypertension – 206,500 people (12.6%)
  • Kidney disease – 14,400 people (0.9%)
  • Long sightedness – 537,600 people (32.7%)
  • Mental and behavioural conditions – 301,600 people (18.3%)
  • Osteoporosis – 63,900 people (3.9%)
  • Short sightedness – 396,000 people (24.1%)
    Compared with Australia, South Australia had higher rates of Arthritis, Back problems, Hayfever, Hypertension, High cholesterol and Long sightedness. Other conditions were similar to the national rate.

    Health risk factors

    Smoking
    • Current daily smoker – 169,100 people (13.1% of persons aged 18 years and over in SA)

    Rates of current daily smokers in South Australia decreased in 2014-15 compared with 2011-12 (16.1%).1

    Overweight and Obesity

    Adults
    • Overweight – 458,500 people (35.6% of persons aged 18 years and over in SA)
    • Obese – 386,900 people (30.0%)
    • Overweight or obese – 846,800 people (65.8%)

    Children
    • Overweight – 52,600 children (16.6% of children aged 2-17 years in SA)
    • Obese – 19,600 children (6.2%)
    • Overweight or obese – 73,500 children (23.2%)

    Alcohol consumption2
    • Exceeded lifetime risk guidelines (no more than two standard drinks on any day) – 216,300 people (16.8% of persons aged 18 years and over in SA)
    • Exceeded single occasion risk guidelines (no more than four standard drinks on a single occasion) – 575,500 people (44.7%)

    Blood pressure
    • High blood pressure (equal to or greater than 140/90 mmHg) – 315,500 people (24.5% of persons aged 18 years and over in SA)

    Daily intake of fruit and vegetables3

    Adults
    • Met the Australian Dietary Guidelines for recommended daily serves of fruit – 627,100 people (48.7% of persons aged 18 years and over in SA)
    • Met the Australian Dietary Guidelines for recommended daily serves of vegetables – 94,000 people (7.3%)
    • Met the Australian Dietary Guidelines for recommended daily serves of both fruit and vegetables – 73,100 people (5.7%)

    Children
    • Met the Australian Dietary Guidelines for recommended daily serves of fruit – 225,500 children (66.6% of children aged 2-18 years in SA)
    • Met the Australian Dietary Guidelines for recommended daily serves of vegetables – 24,400 children (7.2%)
    • Met the Australian Dietary Guidelines for recommended daily serves of both fruit and vegetables – 16,700* children (4.9%)

    Exercise 4
    • Participated in sufficient physical activity – 466,100 people (45.6% of persons aged 18-64 years in SA)

    Compared with Australia, South Australia had a higher rate of persons aged 18 years and over who were overweight or obese and a lower rate of persons aged 18-64 years who were sufficiently active. Other health risk factors were similar to the national rate.


    FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

    For further information about these and related statistics see publication National Health Survey: First Results, 2014-15 (cat. no. 4364.0.55.001), or contact the National Information and Referral Service on 1300 135 070.


    ENDNOTES

    1 All comparisons made between 2011-12 and 2014-15 have been tested for statistical significance with a 95% level of confidence that there is a real difference in the two populations being tested. To determine whether there is a statistical difference between any other two estimates, significance testing should be undertaken.

    2 National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), 2009. Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol, Canberra: NHMRC. <http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/ds10-alcohol.pdf>. For more information see Glossary.

    3 National Health and Medical Research Council (2013) Australian Dietary Guidelines. Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council. <https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/sites/default/files/files/the_guidelines/n55_australian_dietary_guidelines.pdf > For more information see Glossary.

    4 Sufficient physical activity (duration and session) is defined as 150 minutes of physical activity per week over five or more sessions including walking for fitness/transport, moderate and/or vigorous physical activity.

    * estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution