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1370.0 - Measures of Australia's Progress, 2010  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 15/09/2010   
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Culture

Participation in sporting social or community activities(a)(b)(c) - 2008
Graph Image for Participation in sporting social or community activities(a)(b)(c) - 2008

Footnote(s): (a) By remoteness area. (b) Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over. (c) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who participated in sporting, social or community activities in the 12 months prior to the interview.

Source(s): ABS National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2008 (cat. no. 4714.0)

Involvement in cultural events ceremonies or organisations(a)(b)(c) - 2008
Graph Image for Involvement in cultural events ceremonies or organisations(a)(b)(c) - 2008

Footnote(s): (a) By remoteness area. (b) Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over. (c) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who were involved in events, ceremonies or organisations in the 12 months prior to the interview.

Source(s): ABS National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2008 (cat. no. 4714.0)

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES

Social involvement

In 2008, the majority (93%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had participated in some type of sporting, social or community activity in the 12 months prior to interview. This included activities such as coaching or refereeing sport, attending church or community festivals, and going to the movies, a park or a museum. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children also had high levels of participation with 94% of those aged 4-14 years participating in some type of sporting, social or community activity.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander elders are important members of Indigenous communities and are often knowledge keepers of their people's history, stories, culture and language. In 2008, almost one-third (31%) of Indigenous children aged 4-14 years spent at least one day a week with an Indigenous leader or elder.

Indigenous children living in remote areas were much more likely to spend time with an Indigenous leader or elder, with close to half (48%) spending at least one day a week in their company. In comparison, 23% of Indigenous children living in major cities and 28% of those living in regional areas spent at least one day a week with an Indigenous leader or elder. Just over two-thirds (67%) of Indigenous children living in major cities spent no time with, or did not have available, an Indigenous leader or elder.

Involvement in cultural events or activities

In 2008, almost three-quarters (73%) of Indigenous children aged 4-14 years and over three-fifths (63%) of Indigenous people aged 15 years and over were involved in cultural events, ceremonies or organisations in the 12 months prior to interview. Indigenous people who lived in remote or very remote areas reported higher rates of involvement than those living in the major cities (81% compared to 56%).

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