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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2012  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/05/2012   
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Forestry and fishing

FORESTRY AND FISHING INDUSTRY


The contribution of an industry to the overall production of goods and services in an economy, gross domestic product (GDP), is measured by industry gross value added (GVA). Information on the relationship between industry GVA and GDP is provided in the Industry structure and performance chapter.

Table 17.1 shows industry gross value added (in volume terms) for the Forestry and fishing industry. Between 2008–09 and 2010–11, GVA for the industry increased by 9%.


17.1 FORESTRY AND FISHING INDUSTRY(a), Gross value added(b)

2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
$m
$m
$m

Forestry and fishing
4 478
4 499
4 878

(a) Classified according to the National Income and Production Industry Classification (NIPIND) which uses as its basis the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0).
(b) Volume measures. Reference year is 2009–10.

Source: Australian System of National Accounts 2010–11 (5204.0).


Table 17.2 shows employment for the Forestry and logging industry. Between 2008–09 and 2010–11, total employment decreased from 7,500 to 5,600 people, a fall of 25%.


17.2 FORESTRY AND LOGGING INDUSTRY(a), Employment(b)

2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
ANZSIC Subdivision
'000
'000
'000

Forestry and logging
7.5
7.0
5.6

(a) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0).
(b) Annual average of quarterly data. Note that some of the quarterly estimates are subject to sampling variability too high for most practical purposes. This affects two quarters of 2008–09, one quarter of 2009–10 and three quarters of 2010–11.

Source: Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly (6291.0.55.003).


In 2009–10, the Forestry and logging industry generated $3,567 million in sales and service income (table 17.3), a 12% increase on the previous year. Total income was $3,552 million, a 3% fall on the previous year.

Industry value added (IVA) increased to $1,189 million in 2009–10, a 26% rise over the previous year. Despite the increased IVA, fewer than half of the businesses in the industry made a profit or broke even.


17.3 FORESTRY AND LOGGING INDUSTRY(a), Selected indicators

Business profitability

Wages and salaries(b)
Total income
Sales and service income(c)
Operating profit before tax
Capital expenditure(d)
Industry value added
Profit margin
Made a profit
Broke even
Made a loss
ANZSIC Subdivision
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
%
%
%
%

Forestry and logging
2008–09
568
3 658
3 189
*152
^779
940
4.8
28.5
3.2
68.4
2009–10
540
3 552
3 567
–22
*628
1 189
–0.6
39.7
1.4
58.9

^ estimate has a relative standard error of 10% to less than 25% and should be used with caution
* estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution
(a) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0).
(b) Includes capitalised wages and salaries. Excludes the drawings of working proprietors.
(c) Includes rent, leasing and hiring income.
(d) Includes capital work done for own use.

Source: Australian Industry 2009–10 (8155.0).


Table 17.4 shows employment for the Fishing, hunting and trapping industry. Between 2008–09 and 2010–11, total employment increased from 4,600 to 7,300 people, an increase of 59%.


17.4 FISHING, HUNTING AND TRAPPING INDUSTRY(a), Employment(b)

2008–09
2009–10
2010–11

ANZSIC Subdivision
'000
'000
'000
Fishing, hunting and trapping
4.6
7.6
7.3

(a) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0).
(b) Annual average of quarterly data. Note that most of the quarterly estimates are subject to sampling variability too high for most practical purposes. This affects all quarters of 2008–09, two quarters of 2009–10 and one quarter of 2010–11.

Source: Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly (6291.0.55.003).


In 2009–10, the Fishing, hunting and trapping industry generated $1,706 million in sales and service income (table 17.5), a 5% decrease on the previous year. Total income was $1,818 million, a 7% fall on the previous year.

17.5 FISHING, HUNTING AND TRAPPING INDUSTRY(a), Selected indicators

Business profitability

Wages and salaries(b)
Total income
Sales and service income(c)
Operating profit before tax
Capital expenditure(d)
Industry value added
Profit margin
Made a profit
Broke even
Made a loss
ANZSIC Subdivision
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
%
%
%
%

Fishing, hunting and trapping
2008–09
278
1 950
1 800
^316
*216
^765
17.6
74.5
1.6
23.9
2009–10
234
1 818
1 706
np
*160
628
np
73.6
0.7
25.7

^ estimate has a relative standard error of 10% to less than 25% and should be used with caution
* estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution
np not available for publication but included in totals where applicable
(a) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0).
(b) Includes capitalised wages and salaries. Excludes the drawings of working proprietors.
(c) Includes rent, leasing and hiring income.
(d) Includes capital work done for own use.

Source: Australian Industry 2009–10 (8155.0).

 

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Statistics contained in the Year Book are the most recent available at the time of preparation. In many cases, the ABS website and the websites of other organisations provide access to more recent data. Each Year Book table or graph and the bibliography at the end of each chapter provides hyperlinks to the most up to date data release where available.


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