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4725.0 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing: A focus on children and youth, Apr 2011  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 23/05/2012  Reissue
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Contents >> Education, Learning and Skills


EDUCATION, LEARNING & SKILLS

This article is part of a comprehensive series released as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing: A focus on children and youth.

Note: In this section, 'young children' refers to people aged 0–4 years unless otherwise stated, 'children' refers to those aged 5–14 years and 'young people' refers to people aged 15–24 years. Data presented are from the ABS National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, 2008 (cat. no. 4714.0) and the Survey of Education and Work 2008 and 2009 (cat. no. 6227.0).

KEY MESSAGES

Of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0–4 years in 2008:
  • 90% had participated in informal learning activities with their main carer in the previous week
  • 44% of those aged 3–4 years were reported to be attending preschool, compared with 70% of all Australian children.
Of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5–14 years in 2008:
  • 98% were reported to be usually attending school (including 3% who were in preschool and 9% who were in kindergarten or preparatory school)
  • 8% were reported to have missed days at school without permission in the previous year.
Of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people aged 15–19 years in 2008:
  • 46% were attending secondary school and 14% were attending a tertiary institution such as TAFE, university or a business college
  • 10% were not studying, but had completed Year 12 or higher qualification.
Of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people aged 15–24 years in 2008:
  • 54% were fully engaged in work and/or study (up from 47% in 2002).

Learning new skills through formal and informal education pathways can be the stepping stones for children and young adults to participate in the workforce and build strong social networks (Endnote 1). The Framework for Measuring Wellbeing: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, 2010 (cat. no. 4703.0) identifies 'Education, Learning and Skills' as a major domain of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander wellbeing.

The topics covered in this chapter include:

ENDNOTES

1. Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA), 2008, Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians <www.mceecdya.edu.au>.





This section contains the following subsection :
      Early learning and care
      Being at school
      The transition from education to work
      Other resources about education

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