8679.0 - Film, Television and Digital Games, Australia, 2015-16 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 15/06/2017   
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EMPLOYMENT ACTIVITY

This section summarises the key employment data of the businesses surveyed, with comparisons to results from the previous survey in 2011-12 where applicable. Employment figures are at a point in time at end June 2016 and on a headcount basis. These data can be found in data cubes 1 and 3-5.

Graph Image for Key employment data, 2015-16(a)

Footnote(s): (a) Includes working proprietors and partners of unincorporated businesses.

Source(s): Film, Television and Digital Games, Australia, 2015-16




FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION BUSINESSES

Film and video production businesses employed 14,638 people at end June 2016. This is an increase from end June 2012 of 9.1% and aligns with the increase in wages of 15.3% over the same period. The largest type of employees for film and video production businesses were casuals who made up 39.4% of total employees (or 5,767 people), followed by permanent full-time employees at 32.6% of all employees (or 4,766 people). Film and video production businesses employed 58.0% men and 42.0% women at end June 2016.


FILM AND VIDEO POST-PRODUCTION BUSINESSES

Film and video post-production businesses employed 2,462 people at end June 2016, an increase from end June 2012 of 4.9%. At end June 2016 permanent full-time employees made up 67.1% of all employees (or 1,652 people). Casual employees increased by 41.1% compared to 2011-12 and now make up 8.4% of total employees. Film and video post-production businesses employed 72.2% men and 27.8% women at end June 2016.


COMMERCIAL FREE-TO-AIR BROADCASTERS

Commercial free-to-air broadcasters businesses employed 8,012 people at end June 2016, an increase from end June 2012 of 2.0%. At end June 2016 permanent full-time employees made up 63.6% of all employees (or 5,098 people). The proportion of full time permanent employees decreased from 69.5% to 63.6% since end of June 2012 and the proportion of casual employees increased during this period from 25.8% to 30.7% of total employees. Commercial free-to-air broadcasters employed 55.8% men and 44.2% women at end June 2016.

Commercial free-to-air broadcasters continue to employ large numbers of on-set production staff with 747 people employed as cast and 1,555 people employed as crew at end June 2016. This is an increase of total on-set production staff of 11.0% since 2011-12 and aligns with their increase in in-house production activity.

Graph Image for Employment at end June, by occupation type, 2015-16(a)(b)

Footnote(s): (a) Includes working proprietors and partners of unincorporated businesses; (b) Persons are categorised to the activity on which they spend the majority of their time.

Source(s): Film, Television and Digital Games, Australia, 2015-16




SUBSCRIPTION BROADCASTERS AND CHANNEL PROVIDERS

Subscription broadcasters and channel providers employed 5,416 people at end June 2016, a decrease from end June 2012 of 1.1%. At end June 2016 permanent full-time employees made up 73.7% of all employees (or 3,994 people). The proportion of permanent full time employees has increased from 64.3% since end June 2012 and the proportion of casual employees decreased during this period from 26.7% to 16.0% of total employees. Subscription broadcasters and channel providers employed 54.3% men and 45.7% women at end June 2016.


DIGITAL GAMES DEVELOPERS

Digital games developers employed 734 people at end June 2016, an increase from end June 2012 of 26.3%. At end June 2016 permanent full-time employees made up 79.0% of all employees (or 580 people). Digital game developers employ highly specialised production staff such as animation, computer generated imagery and visual effects technicians, game designers and computer programmers. These three occupation groups make up 68.3% of total employment.

There has been a increase in the number of females employed by Digital game developers from 51 at end June 2012 to 110 at end June 2016. Females have also increased as a percentage of employment for Digital game developers from 8.7% at end June 2012 to 15.0% at end June 2016.