8679.0 - Film, Television and Digital Games, Australia, 2015-16 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 15/06/2017   
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PRODUCTION ACTIVITY

This section summarises the production of film, television, video and digital game content that occurred during the reference period. These data can be found in the 'Production activity' data cube in the Downloads tab.

The volume of production activity is measured as follows:
  • Number of broadcast hours (for television programs)
  • Number of productions (for film and video other than television programs, and for digital games)
  • Total cost of production (for all types of production).

It should be noted that total production costs are not equivalent to total expenses. Refer to the Glossary for details.

The following graph summarises the production costs for types of production.

Graph Image for Total production costs for film, television and video, 2015-16



PRODUCTION OF FILM, TELEVISION AND VIDEO

During 2015-16, all businesses (excluding digital game developers) incurred $3,436.1m in production costs for total film, television and video content. These costs included development, pre-production, shoot and post-production costs. Of these production costs, television programs and feature films accounted for 73.4% (or $2,522.8m) and 15.0% (or $513.9m) respectively.

Broadcasters and channel providers incurred 55.2% (or $1,895.4m) of the total production costs for total film, television and video content. This is an increase from the 2011-12 share of 44.0% (or $1,308.1m) of total production costs, and a sign of more programming and production being moved in-house by broadcasters and channel providers. This is particularly the case for television programs, where despite overall production costs increasing by $423.3m since 2011-12, the production costs incurred by film and video production and post-production businesses actually fell by $133.8m. Consequently the share of total television program production costs recorded by these businesses has fallen from 39.4% to 27.5% over that time period. In terms of production types, sports programming contributed the most at $909.9m (or 36.1%) to total production costs for television programs in 2015-16.

During 2015-16 there were 87,466 commercial broadcast hours for first release television programs, an increase of 11.2% compared to 2011-12. News and current affairs programs accounted for the largest proportion of these hours with 50,160 (or 57.3%).

The average cost per hour graph below indicates the variability in the average cost per hour by production type for television. Drama and children's drama incurred the highest average cost per hour with $645,700 and $476,100 respectively, with the average cost of drama increasing by 15.2% since 2011-12. By contrast, average production costs per hour for news and current affairs was $11,900, with light entertainment and variety costing $91,900 on average per hour.

Graph Image for Production of television programs, by production type, 2015-16(a)

Footnote(s): (a) Excludes commercials and program promotions; (b) Includes situation and sketch comedy; (c) Includes quiz, panel and game shows; (d) Number of commercial broadcast hours and average cost per hour for Sport and Other television programs are not available for publication, but have been included in totals where applicable; (e) Includes only completed hours. See Glossary for further information.

Source(s): Film, Television and Digital Games, Australia, 2015-16



During 2015-16 all businesses (excluding digital game developers) incurred $683.1m in related production costs for film and video productions other than television programs and commercials. Feature films accounted for the majority of these costs with 75.2% (or $513.9m). Online productions accounted for total production costs of $93.6m (or 13.7%), an increase from the $5.5m (or 0.9%) reported in 2011-12. The increase in online production costs is driven by increased volumes of corporate videos and educational media that tend to be delivered through digital platforms. Also contributing to the increase in online production costs are costs associated with web series created for online consumption, which contributed $19.3m in 2015-16.

During 2015-16 there were 22,175 first release productions for film and video other than television and commercials. This is a large increase of 196.9% compared to 2011-12 and is being driven by corporate videos which are up by 143.9%, with reasons for the increase including the proliferation of corporate promotion and content marketing through new and cheaper mediums.

Graph Image for Production of film and video other than television programs, by production type, 2015-16(a)

Footnote(s): (a) Excludes commercials and program promotions; (b) Includes short documentaries; (c) Episodic content created for online consumption that forms part of a web series or television series.

Source(s): Film, Television and Digital Games, Australia, 2015-16




PRODUCTION OF DIGITAL GAMES

During 2015-16 digital game developers produced 178 digital games and incurred $52.0m in related production costs. The average cost per production of digital games varied by format.

Digital games produced for mobile and web platforms incurred the largest share of production costs at 63.7% of total production costs; with digital games produced for this format recording a large increase in the average cost per production from $74,000 in 2011-12 to $337,500 in 2015-16. Games produced exclusively for consoles (including handheld consoles) incurred the highest average cost per production ($372,200). By contrast, games developed exclusively for PC and Mac platforms had the lowest average cost per production ($93,800). These figures exclude titles developed simultaneously for multiplatforms, which incurred an average cost of $251,100 per production.

Graph Image for Production of digital games, by production type, 2015-16

Footnote(s): (a) Includes handheld consoles.

Source(s): Film, Television and Digital Games, Australia, 2015-16