4610.0 - Water Account, Australia, 2015-16 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 23/11/2017   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

STATE AND TERRITORY SUMMARIES

WATER ACCOUNT AUSTRALIA 2015-16

New South Wales

New South Wales consumes nearly one-third (32%) of Australia's total water consumption. Overall, New South Wales reduced its water consumption by 18% - down to 5,217 gigalitres - compared with 6,329 gigalitres in 2014-15. This reduction was primarily driven by a 24% decrease in water consumption by Agriculture (down to 3,150 gigalitres from 4,120 in 2014-15).

Total GVIAP remained steady at $3.1 billion (20% of Australia's GVIAP).

New South Wales has the highest household water consumption in Australia, at 30% of national total. In 2015-16, this remained fairly steady (562 GL, up 1% from 2014-15), with a small drop in per household water consumption (194 kL per household). There was also a small drop (2%) in the average price paid per kilolitre for New South Wales households, down to $2.71. This remains below the Australian average of $3.08 per kilolitre.

New South Wales' (non-Agriculture) industries showed an overall 9% decrease in water consumption in 2015-16. Manufacturing industry decreased its water consumption by 11% in 2015-16 (down to 108 gigalitres of water), Mining fell 5%, down to 81 gigalitres, and Other industries (mainly service industries) fell 15% from 333 gigalitres in 2014-15 to 284 gigalitres in 2015-16.

Water use productivity (or Gross State Product per kilolitre of water consumed) for New South Wales increased from $81 per kilolitre consumed in 2014-15, to $102 per kilolitre consumed in 2015-16, on a par with the Australian average of $103 per kilolitre (kL). New South Wales revenue for total water sales and services remained at $4.3 billion in 2015-16.

Victoria

Victorian industry and households consumed 3,719 gigalitres of water in 2015-16, down from 4,215 (12% decrease) in 2014-15. Agricultural water consumption fell 15% (to 2,326 gigalitres), and Victoria has the largest share of GVIAP for Australia (30% of Australia's GVIAP), although this fell from $4.9 billion to $4.5 billion in 2015-16.

Victorian households increased their water consumption by 4% from 2014-15 to 2015-16, to make them the second-highest consumers of water in Australia (384 gigalitres, 20% of total Australian household water consumption). Victoria's consumption per household increased from 162 kilolitres per household in 2014-15, to 166 kilolitres per household in 2015-16. Victorian households paid more for their water in 2015-16 - $3.00 per kilolitre - up from $2.73 per kilolitre in 2014-15, still slightly below the national average of $3.08.

Total non-Agricultural industries reduced their water consumption by 9% between 2014-15 and 2015-16. Manufacturing water consumption remained steady (138 gigalitres in 2015-16); Other industries fell 12% (by 29 gigalitres, down to 213 gigalitres). Overall, Victoria's water use productivity (or Gross State Product per kilolitre of water consumed) increased to $100 per kilolitre of water consumed (up from $86 in 2014-15). Sales and service revenue for Victoria remains the highest in the country, at $4.5 billion in 2015-16 (up slightly from $4.4 billion in 2014-15).

Queensland

Queensland water consumption increased by 6% in 2015-16, up to 3,958 gigalitres, overtaking Victoria as the second-highest water consuming state in Australia.

This increase was primarily driven by Agriculture, which increased water consumption by 9% (by 204 gigalitres, up to 2,454 gigalitres) in 2015-16, and, to a lesser extent, Other industries, which increased water consumption by 17% (an increase of 43 gigalitres). This compares with decreases for Mining and Manufacturing, which, combined, consumed 38 gigalitres less than in 2014-15.

Queensland GVIAP increased by just over $200 million, up to $3.8 billion.

Household water consumption in Queensland remained stable (less than 1% decrease; 375 gigalitres), as a result of a slight decrease in water consumption per household from 206 kilolitres per household in 2014-15 to 200 kilolitres per household in 2015-16. There was a 5% increase in the price per household, up to $3.69 per kilolitre of water consumed by a household, above the Australian household average of $3.08 per kilolitre.

Water use productivity (Gross State Product per kilolitre of water consumed) dropped slightly to $79 per kilolitre, below the Australian average of $103 per kilolitre. Sales and service revenue for water and related services showed a slight increase, up to $4.3 billion in 2015-16.

South Australia

South Australian water consumption increased by 14% in 2015-16, up 143 gigalitres to 1,175 gigalitres. Increases were seen across the board in South Australia, with the largest increases, by volume, occurring in Agriculture (an increase of 95 gigalitres, up 13%). GVIAP for South Australia was relatively unchanged ($1.8 billion in 2015-16), with a large drop in Dairy cattle being compensated by an increase in the Fruit and nuts commodity group.

South Australian households increased their water consumption by 9%, to 136 gigalitres, in 2015-16. Consumption per household increased by 8%, to 194 kilolitres per household. South Australian households paid an average of $4.23 per kilolitre, a 5% drop on 2014-15.

Among non-Agricultural industries, largest increases in water consumption were seen in Other industries (an increase of 23 gigalitres (28%) up to 103 gigalitres in 2015-16), and Mining, which increased its water use 86% to 46 gigalitres. Manufacturing consumed 49 gigalitres in 2015-16, up 7% from 2014-15. Overall water use productivity dropped to $86 per kilolitre for South Australia (down from $96 per kilolitre in 2014-15).

Western Australia

Water consumption in Western Australia showed an overall decrease of 5%, down to 1,415 gigalitres in 2015-16. Unlike most other States, water consumption in Western Australia is dominated by non-Agricultural industries, making up 52% of the State's water consumption, compared with 25% from Agriculture.

The State's decrease was driven by a 20% reduction in water consumption by the Mining industry, a decrease of 89 gigalitres in 2015-16, down to 363 gigalitres. The State's overall reduced consumption was despite a 14% increase in water consumption by Agriculture.

Western Australian household water consumption increased 3% to 335 gigalitres in 2015-16, despite a slight decrease in per household water consumption. Western Australian households consumed 241 kilolitres per household, second highest in the country and well above the Australian average of 190 kilolitres per household. Western Australian households also pay the least for water, at $2.51 per kilolitre, although it continues to steadily increase over time.

The State's GVIAP remained steady (just under $1 billion), and water use productivity for Western Australia increased from $169 per kilolitre in 2014-15, to $180 per kilolitre in 2015-16. Sales and service revenue for water and related services showed a slight decrease, at $1.8 billion in 2015-16.

Tasmania

Tasmania consumed 453 gigalitres of water in 2015-16, a 23% (86 gigalitre) increase on 2014-15. Most of this increase was due to a large 78 gigalitre (34%) increase in Agricultural water consumption. GVIAP for Tasmania was $816 million in 2015-16.

Tasmanian households increased their water consumption by 3% to just under 38 gigalitres. Per household consumption of water increased slightly to 147 kilolitres per household, but remains the lowest in Australia, and well below the Australian average of 190 kilolitres per household. The price per household for water consumed by Tasmanian households increased slightly to $2.84 per kilolitre.

Reduced water consumption by Mining and Manufacturing (combined consumed a total of 45 gigalitres in 2015-16), was more than offset by a 46% increase in water consumption by Other industries, which increased its water consumption from 20 gigalitres in 2014-15 to just under 30 gigalitres in 2015-16. Water productivity for Tasmania declined 19% in 2015-16, down to $57 per kilolitre, from $70 per kilolitre in 2014-15. This is the lowest in the country, and much lower than the Australian average of $103 per kilolitre water consumed.

Northern Territory

The Northern Territory consumed 144 gigalitres of water in 2015-16, a decrease of 6% from 2014-15. Agriculture was the main driver of this decrease (decreased 23% to 44 gigalitres in 2015-16.

These decreases were partially offset by increases in Mining (8%); Other industries (7%); and household water consumption (11% increase). Northern Territory households increased their per household water consumption by 4%, up to 349 kilolitres per household, the highest in the country. The price of water consumed per household increased 8% in 2015-16, to $3.36 per kilolitre, above the national average of $3.08 per kilolitre.

Northern Territory's water use productivity increased from $151 per kilolitre in 2014-15 to $164 per kilolitre in 2015-16, well above the average Australian water use productivity of $103 per kilolitre of water consumed.

Australian Capital Territory

The Australian Capital Territory consumed 51 gigalitres of water in 2015-16, an increase of 7% (3 gigalitres) on 2014-15. This increase is comprised of an 11% increase in Other industries (1.2 gigalitres) and a 6% increase (1.8 gigalitres) in household consumption. Households accounted for 62% of the ACT's total water consumption (31 gigalitres), with the next largest contributor being Other industries (12 gigalitres).

Per household water consumption increased to 203 kilolitre in 2015-16 (from 195 kilolitres per household in 2014-15), and the price per household remained fairly constant ($3.17 per kilolitre).

Water use productivity in the Australian Capital Territory was $713 per kilolitre in 2015-16, a decrease from $730 per kilolitre in 2014-15. This amount is far above the Australian average of $103 per kilolitre, due to the ACT's lack of water-intensive industries relative to all other States and Territories.