3412.0 - Migration, Australia, 2014-15 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/03/2016   
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NET OVERSEAS MIGRATION

Net overseas migration (NOM) is the net gain or loss of population through immigration to Australia and emigration from Australia. Data provided by the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) are used by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) to calculate the official NOM estimates each quarter.

In 2014-15, NOM decreased from the previous year, recording an annual estimate of 168,200 persons, which was 9.8% (18,200 persons) less than in 2013-14 and 6.8% (12,200 persons) less than the dip experienced in 2010-11 when NOM added 180,400 persons to Australia for the year. Net Overseas Migration for 2014-15 was the lowest recorded since the introduction of the '12/16 month rule' methodology from July 2006.


Graph Image for 2.1 Net Overseas Migration (NOM)(a)(b) - Australia

Footnote(s): (a) Contains a break in series at 30 June 2006 - see paragraphs 22-23 of the Explanatory Notes. (b) Estimates from September quarter 2014 onwards are preliminary - see paragraph 9 of the Explanatory Notes.

Source(s): Australian Historical Population Statistics (cat. no. 3105.0.65.001); Migration, Australia (cat. no. 3412.0)



In 2014-15, NOM contributed the greatest number of people to the most populous states: New South Wales with a net increase of 66,100 persons, followed by Victoria (54,100 persons), Queensland (19,100 persons) and Western Australia (14,100 persons). Tasmania had the lowest net increase with 1,000 persons (see Table 2.2). For the most up-to-date official estimates of NOM by state and territory produced by the ABS, see Australian Demographic Statistics (cat. no. 3101.0). For the most up-to-date forecasts of NOM produced by DIBP, see The Outlook for Net Overseas Migration at: http://www.border.gov.au/about/reports-publications/research-statistics/statistics


2.2 NOM, Selected characteristics - State & territory - 2014-15(a)

NOM
NOM ARRIVALS
NOM DEPARTURES
Overseas arrivals
Median age
Sex ratio(b)
Overseas departures
Median age
Sex ratio(b)
State or territory
no.
%
no.
years
ratio
no.
years
ratio

NSW
66 086
39.3
167 150
26.8
99.8
101 064
29.1
101.0
Vic.
54 052
32.1
130 532
25.8
99.7
76 480
28.5
101.1
Qld
19 076
11.3
83 463
26.4
98.0
64 387
28.6
101.9
SA
10 424
6.2
23 357
26.4
100.6
12 933
28.0
107.6
WA
14 122
8.4
55 522
27.0
104.3
41 400
29.0
114.3
Tas.
1 032
0.6
3 822
26.7
102.4
2 790
28.7
99.9
NT
1 093
0.6
5 927
27.4
132.8
4 834
29.3
145.1
ACT
2 290
1.4
8 771
26.9
100.4
6 481
28.8
106.5
Australia(c)
168 183
100.0
478 557
26.5
100.4
310 374
28.8
103.9

(a) Estimates are preliminary - see paragraph 9 of the Explanatory Notes.
(b) Males per 100 females.
(c) Includes Other Territories.


An individual's actual travel behaviour and associated characteristics, including visa type, are only available from final NOM data, as these can only be accurately determined at the end of the 16 month reference period following a traveller's initial border crossing.

The DIBP manages and grants visas each year in accordance with relevant legislation, government planning and policy. It is important to note that there is a difference between when and how many visas are granted by DIBP; and when and how they may impact on NOM, and therefore Australia's estimated resident population (ERP). For example, for many visas there can be a lag between a visa being granted and the actual use of that visa by the applicant on entering Australia. Also, some travellers who have been granted permanent or long-term temporary visas may end up staying in Australia for a short period of stay or not at all. In addition, travellers may also apply for, and be granted, a different visa whilst in Australia or overseas. However, without an additional border crossing within the reference quarter to capture a traveller's change of visa, the NOM system is unable to show these occurrences.

Table 2.3 shows a breakdown of the types of visa groups which have contributed to final NOM. It shows that temporary visa holders are the main contributors to NOM in the 2013-14 financial year.


2.3 NOM, by major groupings and visa(a) - Australia - 2013-14

NOM ARRIVAL
NOM DEPARTURE
NOM
Major groupings and visa
no.
%
no.
%
no.
%

Temporary visas
258 995
54.6
134 129
46.6
124 866
67.0
Vocational education and training sector
9 795
2.1
8 293
2.9
1 502
0.8
Higher education sector
79 278
16.7
26 583
9.2
52 695
28.3
Student other
25 528
5.4
9 364
3.3
16 164
8.7
Temporary work skilled (subclass 457)
33 329
7.0
22 440
7.8
10 889
5.8
Visitor(b)
48 653
10.3
15 628
5.4
33 025
17.7
Working holiday
54 449
11.5
27 093
9.4
27 356
14.7
Other temporary visas
7 963
1.7
24 728
8.6
-16 765
-9.0
Permanent Visas
94 953
20.0
20 026
7.0
74 927
40.2
Family
35 806
7.6
5 793
2.0
30 013
16.1
Skill
40 486
8.5
8 101
2.8
32 385
17.4
Special eligibility and humanitarian
13 232
2.8
155
0.1
13 077
7.0
Other permanent visas
5 429
1.1
5 977
2.1
-548
-0.3
New Zealand citizen (subclass 444)
37 927
8.0
25 722
8.9
12 205
6.5
Australian citizen
73 113
15.4
92 698
32.2
-19 585
-10.5
Other(c)
9 167
1.9
15 215
5.3
-6 048
-3.2
Total
474 155
100.0
287 790
100.0
186 365
100.0

(a) The visa category information in this table represents the number of visas based on the visa type at the time of a traveller's specific movement. It is this specific movement that has been used to calculate NOM. Therefore, the number of visas in this table should not be confused with information on the number of visas granted by DIBP.
(b) Visitor visas include tourists, business visitors, medical treatment and other.
(c) Includes residents returning (i.e. non Australian citizens who have a permanent resident visa) and visa unknown.