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3302.0 - Deaths, Australia, 2012  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 07/11/2013   
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DEATH RATES


Crude death rates

Given the ageing of Australia's population, the overall decline in the crude death rate indicates a considerable decline in age-specific death rates over the period. In 2012, the crude death rate was 6.5 per 1,000 population, decreasing from 6.9 in 2002. For more information on mortality rates, please see data cube Table 2: Death rates, Summary, States and territories - 2002 to 2012.


Age-specific death rates

In 2012, people aged 5-9 years and 10-14 years had the lowest age-specific death rates (ASDR) in Australia. ASDRs begin to increase from around 15 years of age. For nearly all age groups, ASDRs are higher for males than for females. The exceptions are for the age groups between 1-14 years, where the ASDRs are the same.

Age-specific death rates for males increase gradually until around age 40-44 years, after which they begin to increase more quickly throughout the older age groups. Age-specific death rates for females aged 15-44 years are relatively low and constant. Steady increases in female ASDRs are evident beyond 45-49 years of age and continue throughout the older age groups.


Standardised death rates

Australia

The standardised death rate (SDR) for Australia decreased to 5.5 deaths per 1,000 standard population in 2012, down from 5.7 in 2011 and 6.8 in 2002 (see graph 1.3).
Graph Image for 1.3 STANDARDISED DEATH RATES(a), Australia - 1976 to 2012

Footnote(s): (a) Deaths per 1,000 standard population. Standardised death rates use the age distribution of total persons in the Australian population at 30 June 2001 as the standard population.

Source(s): Deaths, Australia (3302.0).


States and territories

In 2012, the Northern Territory had the highest SDR (7.7 deaths per 1,000 standard population). Tasmania recorded the second highest SDR (6.6). The Australian Capital Territory had the lowest SDR (4.9).

Over the past 10 years, all states and territories experienced overall declines in their SDRs. Victoria and the Northern Territory experienced the largest declines (each falling by 1.4 deaths per 1,000 standard population). South Australia, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory experienced the smallest declines (each falling by 1.0 deaths per 1,000 standard population (see graph 1.4).
Graph Image for 1.4 STANDARDISED DEATH RATES(a), States and territories- 2002 and 2012

Footnote(s): (a) Deaths per 1,000 standard population. Standardised death rates use the age distribution of total persons in the Australian population at 30 June 2001 as the standard population.

Source(s): Deaths, Australia (3302.0)


Remoteness areas

In 2012, the standardised death rate was lowest in Australia's Major Cities, with 5.5 deaths per 1,000 standard population, followed by Inner Regional (6.1), Outer Regional (6.4), Remote (6.7) and Very Remote (8.4).

Infant mortality shows a similar pattern in respect of remoteness areas. In 2012, the infant mortality rate was lowest in Major Cities (3.3 deaths per 1,000 live births) and highest in Very Remote areas (8.4 deaths per 1,000 live births). For more information, see data cube Table 7: Deaths, Summary, Remoteness Areas - 2001 to 2012.


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