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1345.4 - SA Stats, Jun 2011  
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FEATURE ARTICLE: SOUTH AUSTRALIAN MIGRATION 2009-10


INTRODUCTION

This article provides an overview of South Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) in 2009-10 and examines the components of net overseas and net interstate migration. It presents this information with a focus on South Australian migration data which are compared with other states, territories and with national migration. This article presents information from the ABS publications Migration, Australia 2009-10 (cat. no. 3412.0) and Australian Demographic Statistics, September 2010 (cat. no. 3101.0).

Key points from this article:

  • The estimated resident population of South Australia grew by 1.2% between June 2009 and June 2010.
  • Between June 2009 and June 2010, South Australia's population growth was primarily driven by net overseas migration.
  • South Australia has reported a net loss to interstate migration every year from 2000-01 to 2009-10.
  • Victoria, Queensland and New South Wales were the top three interstate migration destinations for South Australians.


COMPONENTS OF POPULATION GROWTH

South Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) at June 2010 was 1,644,600 persons, comprising slightly more females than males (50.6% females and 49.4% males). The state ERP represented 7.4% of the Australian estimated population of 22,328,800 persons. South Australia's population grew by 1.2% between June 2009 and June 2010, while the national population grew by 1.7% for the same period.

The population growth in South Australia (20,100 persons) was primarily driven by net overseas migration (15,400 persons), with the remainder of growth (7,700 persons) due to natural increase (the number of births minus the number of deaths). While South Australia was attracting overseas residents to live, work or study, the state had the second largest loss of resident numbers due to net interstate migration. Between June 2009 and June 2010, South Australia had a net interstate migration loss of 3,000 persons. Further details on net overseas and net interstate migration are provided below.

COMPONENTS OF POPULATION CHANGE, Australia - 2009 - 10(a)

NSW
Vic.
Qld
SA
WA
Tas.
NT
ACT
Aust.
('000)
('000)
('000)
('000)
('000)
('000)
('000)
('000)
('000)

ERP 30 June 2009
7 127.2
5 446.6
4 424.8
1624.5
2 244.4
503.3
226.2
352.3
21 951.7
Natural increase
49.9
36.3
39.8
7.7
18.9
2.2
3.1
3.7
161.5
Net overseas migration
66.0
60.4
39.7
15.4
28.2
1.8
1.3
2.7
215.6
Net interstate migration
-10.5
2.6
9.6
-3.0
2.0
0.3
-0.8
-0.1
..
Growth
105.4
99.3
89.1
20.1
49.1
4.4
3.5
6.3
377.1
ERP 30 June 2010
7 232.6
5 545.9
4 513.9
1 644.6
2 293.5
507.6
229.7
358.6
22 328.8

.. not applicable

(a) Estimates for 2009 - 10 are preliminary.

Source: Migration, Australia 2009 - 10 (cat. no. 3412.0)



NET OVERSEAS MIGRATION

Net overseas migration is the net gain or loss of population through immigration to Australia and emigration from Australia. In Australia in 2009-10, the preliminary net Australian overseas migration was 215,600 persons.

In 2009-10, the preliminary net overseas migration in South Australia comprised 10,800 departures and 26,100 arrivals. The median age of residents leaving South Australia to move overseas was 27.7 years, with a sex ratio of 102.9 (males per 100 females). In comparison the median age of persons arriving to live in South Australia was younger at 26.3 years. More males than females were also arriving as with departing, with a sex ratio of 101.1. As the graph shows, most of the migration of persons across Australia's borders was directed to the more populous states.

OVERSEAS MIGRATION FLOWS, By state and territory - 2009-10 (a)
Graph: OVERSEAS MIGRATION FLOWS, By state and territory—2009-10 (a)



NET INTERSTATE MIGRATION

Each year since 2000-01, South Australia has experienced a net interstate migration loss, with a ten year average showing a loss of just under 3,000 persons. In contrast, Queensland was the only state to experience a net interstate migration gain in every year.

Of interest, South Australia's net interstate loss has decreased for the first time since 2005-06.

NET INTERSTATE MIGRATION - 2000-01 to 2009-10 (a)

NSW
Vic.
Qld
SA
WA
Tas.
NT
ACT

2000-01
-16 315
5 163
20 024
-2 418
-3 110
-2 136
-1 592
407
2001-02
-25 102
3 609
30 035
-1 308
-3 582
-1 423
-1 998
-197
2002-03
-32 467
-743
37 984
-1 191
-1 972
1 993
-2 768
-802
2003-04
-31 098
-3 051
35 498
-2 910
2 095
2 574
-1 487
-1 586
2004-05
-26 321
-3 070
30 371
-3 226
2 241
267
610
-842
2005-06
-25 576
-1 831
26 607
-2 711
3 933
-82
-553
258
2006-07
-27 404
-2 418
27 044
-3 658
5 188
-926
253
1 921
2007-08
-21 937
-2 736
23 088
-4 499
4 808
344
1 197
-265
2008-09
-19 831
698
18 388
-4 676
4 825
672
746
-822
2009-10
-10 540
2 555
9 576
-2 964
1 962
322
-842
-69
Annual average 2000-01 to 2009-10
-23 659
-182
25 862
-2 956
1 639
161
-643
-200

(a) Estimates for 2009 - 10 are preliminary.

Source: Migration, Australia 2009 - 10 (cat. no. 3412.0)



In 2009-10 a total of 23,700 South Australians moved interstate, the majority moving to Victoria (6,500 persons or 28%), Queensland (5,800 persons or 25%) and New South Wales (5,000 persons or 21%). Queensland was the most popular destination of all states and territories, recording the highest number of arrivals from interstate (86,400 persons).

Of the 20,700 people who moved to South Australia from interstate in 2009-10, the majority came from Victoria (5,600 persons or 27%), New South Wales (4,600 persons or 22%) and Queensland (4,500 persons or 22%). New South Wales had the highest number of departures with 93,500 persons leaving that state.

INTERSTATE MIGRATION FLOWS FOR SOUTH AUSTRALIA, By state and territory - 2009-10 (a)
Graph: INTERSTATE MIGRATION FLOWS FOR SOUTH AUSTRALIA, By state and territory—2009-10 (a)


From another perspective, South Australia was one of four states and territories to experience net interstate loss in 2009-10, along with New South Wales, Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory.

Interstate movers from and into South Australia tended to be in the young adult age group. Persons aged 20-29 years made up 24% of arrivals and 26% of departures. For South Australia, the gap between interstate departures and arrivals was most pronounced in the 25-29 year age group, with more persons departing than arriving. With age, the number of departures tends to decrease from the 30-34 age group and then increases for the 65 and over age group, indicating that some older persons may be moving interstate to retire.

INTERSTATE MIGRATION FLOWS FOR SOUTH AUSTRALIA, By age - 2009-10 (a)
Graph: INTERSTATE MIGRATION FLOWS FOR SOUTH AUSTRALIA, By age—2009-10 (a)



SUMMARY

Although South Australia's estimated resident population has increased by 1.2% between June 2009 and June 2010, this was mainly due to net overseas migration. More people are moving from South Australia to interstate than are arriving from other states and territories; this is especially pronounced in the 25-29 year age group. As there are fewer younger adults moving to South Australia than are leaving the state this may have implications for the South Australian economy which is characterised by a comparatively ageing population and a workforce needing to replenish itself.


REFERENCES

Australian Demographic Statistics, Sept 2010 (cat. no. 3101.0)

Migration, Australia 2009-10 (cat. no. 3412.0)


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