1267.0 - Australian Standard Classification of Languages (ASCL), 2016  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 18/07/2016   
   Page tools: Print Print Page RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

This document was added 03/28/2017.



WHAT HAS CHANGED

SUMMARY OF CHANGES

Being a minor review, no changes to the broad levels of the Australian Standard Classification of Languages (ASCL) were considered. Changes considered were limited to adding and removing languages, amending the names of some languages and adding appropriate entries to the coding index. These changes were based on Census of Population and Housing 2011 data, research from external sources, and stakeholder queries and suggestions.


LANGUAGES ADDED TO THE CLASSIFICATION

Australian Indigenous Languages

One Australian Indigenous language has been added to the classification, namely:

  • Yugambeh (8965) to Narrow Group 89 Other Australian Indigenous Languages.

Non-Indigenous Languages

Two non-Indigenous languages have been added to ASCL:
  • Zomi (6105) has been added to Narrow Group 61 Burmese and Related Languages
  • Lingala (9262) has been added to Narrow Group 92 African Languages.


LANGUAGES WHICH HAVE BEEN RENAMED

Indigenous Languages

No Indigenous languages were renamed or re-described.

Non-Indigenous Languages

To better reflect the languages in each group, the following languages have been renamed, based on research and stakeholder recommendations:
  • Pitcairnese (9404) has been renamed Norf'k-Pitcairn
  • Makaton (9702) has been renamed Key Word Sign Australia.


CHANGES TO THE CODING INDEX

Australian Indigenous Languages

A number of changes have been made to the coding index relating to Australian Indigenous languages which include:
  • the addition of alternative names and spellings for existing languages
  • changes to the code assigned to index entries relating to Yugambeh (including alternate names and dialects) to reflect the new language category
  • changes to the code assigned to some index entries to correct errors and inconsistencies in coding some languages and dialects.

Non-Indigenous Languages

A number of changes have been made to non-Indigenous languages in the coding index. These changes include:
  • the addition of a large number of alternative names, name variants, and common misspellings of existing languages
  • changes to the code assigned to index entries "Tai Shan" and "Taishanese" to correctly reflect these as a variant of 7101 Cantonese, rather than 6499 Tai nec
  • changes to the code assigned to index entry "Kakwa" to correctly reflect this as a dialect of 9242 Bari, rather than 9299 African Languages nec
  • changes to the code assigned to index entries relating to the new languages added to ASCL (including alternate names and dialects) to reflect the new language categories
  • changes to the code assigned to a number of ambiguous responses to more appropriately assign a 'not further defined' code.


COMPARING CURRENT AND PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF ASCL

The ABS urges users and providers of language data to collect, classify and disseminate data using ASCL 2016 as soon as practicable/possible. There will be circumstances where users need to convert data from earlier versions of ASCL to ASCL 2016. To facilitate this process, a correspondence table between the 2016 and 2011 editions of ASCL is provided. In almost all cases, the languages of the two editions of the classification retain a one-to-one relationship. The correspondence table itemises the code linkages between the languages and indicates the movement of particular languages between groups in the two structures. The correspondence table is provided in the ASCL Data Cube, accessible from the 'Downloads' tab.

In some instances, there is not a direct relationship between the language categories in the two editions of ASCL. Partial linkages at the language level are indicated by including the word 'part' after the code of the language concerned.