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2901.0 - Census Dictionary, 2001  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/04/2001   
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Contents

Highest Level of Schooling Completed (HSCP)
Home owner/purchaser
Homeless people
Hours Worked (HRSP)
House/flat attached to a shop, office
Houseboat
Household
Household form
Household Income (HIND)
Household Income Derivation Indicator (HIDD)
Household members temporarily absent
Household mobility
Household reference person
Household Sample File (HSF)
Household Type (HHTD)
Housing
Housing Loan Repayments (monthly) dollar values (HLRD)
Husband



Highest Level of Schooling Completed (HSCP)

This variable records the highest level of primary or secondary school a person has completed. The data are used to help build a picture of the education levels in each area of Australia and to assist planning of educational facilities.

Highest Level of Schooling Completed is new for the 2001 Census and is classified to the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), released in 2001. Previous censuses requested information on age left school.

Home owner/purchaser

See Housing Loan Repayments (HLRD), Tenure Type (TEND).

Homeless people

An Occasional Paper, Counting the Homeless (Cat. no. 2041.0) was published in 1999 based on data from the 1996 Census. A further paper on homeless people, using data from the 2001 Census may also be published. See also Dwelling Structure (STRD) — Improvised home, tent, sleepers out.

Hours Worked (HRSP)

This variable records the number of hours worked in all jobs held during the week before Census Night, by employed people aged 15 years and over. This excludes any time off but includes any overtime or extra time worked.

Hours worked, when used in combination with Labour Force Status, provides information on full-time and part-time employment. For Census purposes, a person is considered to be working full-time if they worked 35 hours or more in all jobs during the week prior to Census Night.

Information on hours worked, classified by industry and occupation, allows changes in the labour force to be analysed. It also enhances the use of Journey to Work data for transport studies.

See also Individual Income (INCP), Industry of Employment (INDP), Journey to Work (JTW), Occupation (OCCP), Working population.

House/flat attached to a shop, office

See Dwelling Structure (STRD).

Houseboat

Occupied houseboats have been classified as occupied private dwellings since the 1986 Census, and therefore receive Household Forms. Unoccupied houseboats are not counted. Houseboats are included in the category caravan, cabin, houseboat, in the variable Dwelling Structure (STRD).

See also Caravans, houseboats, etc. Dwelling, Dwelling Structure (STRD).

Household

A household is defined as a group of two or more related or unrelated people who usually reside in the same dwelling, who regard themselves as a household, and who make common provision for food or other essentials for living; or a person living in a dwelling who makes provision for his/her own food and other essentials for living, without combining with any other person.

Under this definition, in a group house where occupants share the dwelling, each occupant who usually supplies his/her own food should be counted as a separate household and issued with a separate Household Form. In practice, however, most such households usually only complete one form.

For census purposes, the total number of households is equal to the total number of occupied private dwellings as a census form is completed for each household from which dwelling information for the household is obtained. Analysis of Labour Force Survey data has shown the incidence of multiple household dwellings to be less than 1%.

See also Family, Group household, Household Type (HHTD), Indigenous Household, Lone person household, Relationship Between Families (FRLF), Tenure Type (TEND).

Household form

The household form is the primary means for collecting census data and is used in all private dwellings. A copy of the form used for the 2001 Census is included in Appendix A of this publication. A personal form records person characteristics in cases where a household form is not appropriate. If there are more than six people in a household on Census Night, a personal form is completed for the seventh person, and any subsequent persons.

See also Appendix A, Personal form.

Household Income (HIND)

This variable is the sum of the Individual Incomes (INCP) of each resident present in the household on Census Night. If any resident aged 15 years and over is temporarily absent, or does not state their income, then Household Income (HIND) is not derived for that household.

Individual incomes are collected as ranges by the census. To enable these range values to be summed, information from the Survey of Income and Housing Costs (This survey is used because it collects income as individual values) is used to estimate the median income within each bracket collected by the census. The relevant median value for each household member is then summed to produce the household income figure.

The same methodology is also used to calculate Family Income (FINF).

The categories of Household Income (HIND) include: 'Partial Income Stated' and 'All Incomes Not Stated'. The first category is used when household members are temporarily absent or any household member has not stated their income. The second category is used when no member of the household has stated their income.

In most cases, the income of visitors to a household is excluded from HIND. The exception to this is households that comprise only visitors. HIND is calculated for these households in order to collect data on household income in tourist areas.

HIND and FINF are the standard census multiple income classifications, and are designed to satisfy a broad range of census requirements. If there is a need to recalculate this variable under different circumstances users can use the derived variable Household Income Derivation Indicator (HIDD) in conjunction with Individual Income (INCP) to create a new household income variable.

See also Household, Household Income Derivation Indicator (HIDD), Individual Income (INCP), Median income.

Household Income Derivation Indicator (HIDD)

Household Income Derivation Indicator (HIDD) is used in conjunction with Household Income (HIND).

Household Income (HIND) is calculated by adding the Individual Incomes (INCP) of each household member present on Census Night. HIDD can be used to identify households where people were temporarily absent, did not state their income, or stated a negative income.

HIDD can also be used to remove such households from the table population, or to estimate the impact on total household income caused by negative/no income or persons temporarily absent. See also Household, Household Income (HIND).

Household members temporarily absent

See Temporarily absent.

Household mobility

See Internal migration.

Household reference person

See Family/Household Reference Person Indicator (RPIP), Household.

Household Sample File (HSF)

The Census Household Sample File is a comprehensive unit record database of census characteristics, containing a one percent sample of confidentialised records of private households and associated persons, and persons in non-private dwellings.

For further information contact ABS Information Consultancy.

Household Type (HHTD)

This variable describes the type of household within a dwelling.

Family households can contain non-family members (unrelated persons and visitors). The first three categories (11–13) of this classification can be further broken down to show those households with only family members present and those with non-family members present. This is in line with the ABS standard for this classification. Users requiring this level of information should indicate their requirements to the ABS consultant when specifying tables.

A maximum of three families can be coded to a household. Lone person households can contain visitors. Visitor only households can contain Overseas Visitors.

The Other Not Classifiable category includes those households which the collector determined were occupied on Census Night but where the collector could not make contact; households that contained only persons aged under 15 years; or households which could not be classified elsewhere in this classification because there was insufficient information on the census form.

See also Family, Group household, Household, Lone person household.

Housing

See Dwelling, Dwelling Structure (STRD).

Housing Loan Repayments (monthly) dollar values (HLRD)

This variable records the housing loan repayments being paid by a household to purchase the dwelling in which it was enumerated (also applicable to caravans).

The Census collects this information in single dollars up to $9,999. However, for practical purposes this information is recoded to a specific number of ranges for standard census products. The ranges are listed as a derived variable, HLRD01.

The data are important in analysis of home ownership and for providing benchmark data for evaluating housing needs, housing finance and housing demand.

See also Dwelling Structure (STRD), Household Type (HHTD), Tenure Type (TEND).

Husband

See Partner.


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