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4921.0 - Participation in Selected Cultural Activities, Australia, 2010-11 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 21/02/2012  First Issue
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GLOSSARY

Availability to public

An activity is considered to have been made available to the public if a person shared his/her creative activity with people beyond family or friends, including singing or playing in a public forum with an audience, or posting a video of an activity online (e.g. YouTube). Availability to the public was recorded for up to three cultural activities per person in the 12 months before interview.

Balance of state/territory

Comprises people usually resident in areas outside of the eight capital city Statistical Divisions (as defined in the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) (cat. no. 1216.0)). Balance of state/territory does not include any residents of the Australian Capital Territory (ACT).

Capital city

Comprises people usually resident in areas within the eight capital city Statistical Divisions (as defined in the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) (cat. no. 1216.0)). Includes all residents of the ACT.

Country of birth

Country of birth is classified according to the Standard Australian Classification of Countries (Second Edition) (SACC) (cat. no. 1269.0).

Cultural activity

A cultural activity has been defined as an activity in which a person has participated, which has not been done for secondary or tertiary studies. It excludes activities with no creative aspect such as mending or repairing clothes and home do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. Respondents were asked whether they participated in each of the selected cultural activities listed below, in the 12 months before interview:

  • drama, comedy, opera or musical, including rehearsals (including acting for stage or film, street theatre and stand-up comedy)
  • cabaret or variety act, including rehearsals (including circus performance/acts, rehearsals and classes specific to the performance and informal practice or preparation for a performance)
  • singing or playing a musical instrument as a soloist or as part of a band, choir or orchestra, including rehearsals and classes (including singing for which the respondent has practised or taken lessons, and singing or playing in a public forum with an audience e.g. church choir, performing at an aged care facility or retirement home. Excludes informal or impromptu singing such as around the home or karaoke)
  • dancing, including rehearsals or classes (including dancing for which the respondent has practised or taken lessons. Excludes dancing for another performance such as singing in a band and informal or impromptu dancing such as at weddings or nightclubs)
  • writing song lyrics or mixing or composing music, including digital composition
  • writing any fiction or non-fiction such as stories, poetry or scripts (including blogs but excluding Twitter, Facebook and Myspace profile updates)
  • sculpting, painting, drawing or cartooning, including digital pieces
  • printmaking, screen printing or etching
  • textile crafts, jewellery making, paper crafts or wood crafts (including knitting, embroidery, quilting, dress making or tailoring, cross stitch or tapestries, appliquè, beading, scrapbooking, making cards and collage. Excludes mending or repairing clothes and maintenance and repair)
  • glass crafts, pottery, ceramics or mosaics
  • photography, film-making or editing, apart from personal events (excluding acting in a film, scriptwriting and use of video or DVD as a tool in another activity)
  • designing websites, computer games or interactive software (excluding contributing to websites designed by other people or organisations, posting videos on YouTube, creating profiles on Myspace or Facebook or creating pages on similar websites. Also excludes creating web journals or blogs)
  • fashion design, interior or graphic design (excluding home DIY projects)
  • other digital art or craft not already reported.

Employed

All people aged 15 years and over who, during the week prior to interview:

  • worked for one hour or more for pay, profit, commission or payment in kind in a job or business, or on a farm (comprising employees, employers and own account workers)
  • worked for one hour or more without pay in a family business or on a farm (i.e. contributing family workers)
  • were employees who had a job but were not at work and were:
    • away from work for less than four weeks up to the end of the reference week
    • away from work for more than four weeks up to the end of the reference week and received pay for some or all of the four week period to the end of the reference week
    • away from work as a standard work or shift arrangement
    • on strike or locked out
    • on workers' compensation and expected to return to their job, or
  • were employers or own account workers, who had a job, business or farm, but were not at work.

Employed full-time

Includes employed people who usually worked 35 hours or more a week (in all jobs) and those who, although usually working less than 35 hours a week, worked 35 hours or more during the reference week.

Employed part-time

Includes employed people who usually worked less than 35 hours a week (in all jobs) and either did so during the reference week, or were not at work in the reference week.

Equivalised household income

Equivalising adjusts actual income to take into account the different needs of households of different sizes and compositions. There are economic advantages associated with living with others, because household resources, especially housing, can be shared. The equivalence scale used to obtain equivalised income is that used in studies by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and is referred to as the 'modified OECD scale'. The scale gives a weight of 1.0 to the first adult in the household, a weight of 0.5 for each additional adult (persons aged 15 years and over) and a weight of 0.3 for every child. For each household, the weights of the household members are added together to form a household weight. Total household income is then divided by the household weight to give an income that a lone person household would need for a similar standard of living. Equivalised household income can be viewed as an indicator of the economic resources available to each member of the household.

Frequency of involvement

This refers to the average number of hours per week and the number of weeks in the 12 months before interview during which a person participated in a cultural activity.

Labour force status

A classification of the civilian population aged 15 years and over into employed, unemployed or not in the labour force, as defined. The definitions conform closely to the international standard definitions adopted by the International Conferences of Labour Statisticians.

Main English-speaking countries

The list of main English-speaking countries provided here is not an attempt to classify countries on the basis of whether or not English is the predominant or official language of each country. It is a list of the main countries from which Australia receives, or has received, significant numbers of overseas settlers who are likely to speak English. These countries comprise the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa and the United States of America. Non-main English-speaking countries describes people originating from countries where a language other than English is likely to be spoken by migrants. It is important to note that being from a non-main English-speaking country does not imply a lack of proficiency in English.

Not in the labour force

People who were not in the categories employed or unemployed as defined.

Paid participation

Participation in any of the selected cultural activities for which people received a wage or salary (including from a person's own incorporated business), received income from their own unincorporated business or partnership, worked on commission, received payment by the piece or item produced, or received any other form of income. Payment also includes the provision of goods and services (i.e. payment in kind). Wages and salaries exclude dividends from shares in an incorporated business and Newstart or Youth Allowance received under the Work for the Dole Scheme.

Participant

A person aged 15 years or over who has had any involvement - paid or unpaid - in any one of the activities in the survey in the 12 months before interview.

Participation rate

For any group, this is the number of people participating in the selected cultural activities, expressed as a percentage of the population in the same group.

Qualification

Formal certification, issued by a relevant approved body, in recognition that a person has achieved an appropriate level of learning outcomes or competencies relevant to identified individual, professional, industry or community needs. Statements of attainment awarded for partial completion of a course of study at a particular level are excluded.

Quintiles

Groupings that result from ranking all households or people in the population in ascending order according to some characteristic such as their income, and then dividing the population into five equal groups, each comprising around 20% of the estimated population.

Relevant qualification

Respondents were asked whether they had ever completed a qualification related to the activities they were involved in. It was the respondents' decision whether their qualification was related to a particular activity.

Unemployed

People aged 15 years and over who were not employed during the reference week, and:

  • had actively looked for full-time or part-time work at any time in the four weeks up to the end of the reference week and were available for work in the reference week, or
  • were waiting to start a new job within four weeks from the end of the reference week and could have started in the reference week if the job had been available then.

Unpaid participation

Participation in any of the selected cultural activities for which people did not receive a wage, salary or any other form of income. Unpaid participation includes work in a family business without pay and work as a volunteer. It excludes participation where goods and services were received (included in paid participation).


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